Black Box Thinking - Why Most People Never Learn from Their Mistakes--But Some Do-logo

Black Box Thinking - Why Most People Never Learn from Their Mistakes--But Some Do

Matthew Syed

Nobody wants to fail. But in highly complex organizations, success can happen only when we confront our mistakes, learn from our own version of a black box, and create a climate where it's safe to fail. We all have to endure failure from time to time, whether it's underperforming at a job interview, flunking an exam, or losing a pickup basketball game. But for people working in safety-critical industries, getting it wrong can have deadly consequences. Consider the shocking fact that preventable medical error is the third-biggest killer in the United States, causing more than 400,000 deaths every year. More people die from mistakes made by doctors and hospitals than from traffic accidents. And most of those mistakes are never made public, because of malpractice settlements with nondisclosure clauses. For a dramatically different approach to failure, look at aviation. Every passenger aircraft in the world is equipped with an almost indestructible black box. Whenever there's any sort of mishap, major or minor, the box is opened, the data is analyzed, and experts figure out exactly what went wrong. Then the facts are published and procedures are changed, so that the same mistakes won't happen again. By applying this method in recent decades, the industry has created an astonishingly good safety record. Few of us put lives at risk in our daily work as surgeons and pilots do, but we all have a strong interest in avoiding predictable and preventable errors. So why don't we all embrace the aviation approach to failure rather than the health-care approach? As Matthew Syed shows in this eye-opening book, the answer is rooted in human psychology and organizational culture. Syed argues that the most important determinant of success in any field is an acknowledgment of failure and a willingness to engage with it. Yet most of us are stuck in a relationship with failure that impedes progress, halts innovation, and damages our careers and personal lives. We rarely acknowledge or learn from failure-even though we often clai

Nobody wants to fail. But in highly complex organizations, success can happen only when we confront our mistakes, learn from our own version of a black box, and create a climate where it's safe to fail. We all have to endure failure from time to time, whether it's underperforming at a job interview, flunking an exam, or losing a pickup basketball game. But for people working in safety-critical industries, getting it wrong can have deadly consequences. Consider the shocking fact that preventable medical error is the third-biggest killer in the United States, causing more than 400,000 deaths every year. More people die from mistakes made by doctors and hospitals than from traffic accidents. And most of those mistakes are never made public, because of malpractice settlements with nondisclosure clauses. For a dramatically different approach to failure, look at aviation. Every passenger aircraft in the world is equipped with an almost indestructible black box. Whenever there's any sort of mishap, major or minor, the box is opened, the data is analyzed, and experts figure out exactly what went wrong. Then the facts are published and procedures are changed, so that the same mistakes won't happen again. By applying this method in recent decades, the industry has created an astonishingly good safety record. Few of us put lives at risk in our daily work as surgeons and pilots do, but we all have a strong interest in avoiding predictable and preventable errors. So why don't we all embrace the aviation approach to failure rather than the health-care approach? As Matthew Syed shows in this eye-opening book, the answer is rooted in human psychology and organizational culture. Syed argues that the most important determinant of success in any field is an acknowledgment of failure and a willingness to engage with it. Yet most of us are stuck in a relationship with failure that impedes progress, halts innovation, and damages our careers and personal lives. We rarely acknowledge or learn from failure-even though we often clai
More Information

Description:

Nobody wants to fail. But in highly complex organizations, success can happen only when we confront our mistakes, learn from our own version of a black box, and create a climate where it's safe to fail. We all have to endure failure from time to time, whether it's underperforming at a job interview, flunking an exam, or losing a pickup basketball game. But for people working in safety-critical industries, getting it wrong can have deadly consequences. Consider the shocking fact that preventable medical error is the third-biggest killer in the United States, causing more than 400,000 deaths every year. More people die from mistakes made by doctors and hospitals than from traffic accidents. And most of those mistakes are never made public, because of malpractice settlements with nondisclosure clauses. For a dramatically different approach to failure, look at aviation. Every passenger aircraft in the world is equipped with an almost indestructible black box. Whenever there's any sort of mishap, major or minor, the box is opened, the data is analyzed, and experts figure out exactly what went wrong. Then the facts are published and procedures are changed, so that the same mistakes won't happen again. By applying this method in recent decades, the industry has created an astonishingly good safety record. Few of us put lives at risk in our daily work as surgeons and pilots do, but we all have a strong interest in avoiding predictable and preventable errors. So why don't we all embrace the aviation approach to failure rather than the health-care approach? As Matthew Syed shows in this eye-opening book, the answer is rooted in human psychology and organizational culture. Syed argues that the most important determinant of success in any field is an acknowledgment of failure and a willingness to engage with it. Yet most of us are stuck in a relationship with failure that impedes progress, halts innovation, and damages our careers and personal lives. We rarely acknowledge or learn from failure-even though we often clai

Language:

English

Narrators:

Simon Slater

Length:

12h 16m


Chapters

Free Sample

05:00

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:16


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

06:46


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

06:04


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

06:58


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

07:51


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

06:14


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:08


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

07:21


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

07:28


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

08:51


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

08:45


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

05:10


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

04:42


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

04:56


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

05:13


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

08:07


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

08:43


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

06:56


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

06:06


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

07:46


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

08:56


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

08:41


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

05:46


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

04:07


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

05:20


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

07:38


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

05:25


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

04:59


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

08:57


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

07:42


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

08:54


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

08:00


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

05:01


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

05:50


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

04:55


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

05:30


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

06:38


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

08:05


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

08:13


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

07:23


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

05:02


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

05:53


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

08:45


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

07:48


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

04:09


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

06:44


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

08:52


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

04:26


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

05:39


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

05:48


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

04:49


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

04:38


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

07:58


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

06:52


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

04:55


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

04:28


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

04:01


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

05:29


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

05:29


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

05:48


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

05:16


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

06:01


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

06:08


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

06:49


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

04:35


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

04:29


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

05:40


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

06:32


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

06:27


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

05:44


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

06:55


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

05:22


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

04:42


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

08:33


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

04:19


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

05:50


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

07:25


Chapter 78
Chapter 78

05:38


Chapter 79
Chapter 79

07:51


Chapter 80
Chapter 80

07:29


Chapter 81
Chapter 81

05:44


Chapter 82
Chapter 82

05:07


Chapter 83
Chapter 83

05:57


Chapter 84
Chapter 84

04:35


Chapter 85
Chapter 85

05:43


Chapter 86
Chapter 86

07:24


Chapter 87
Chapter 87

05:50


Chapter 88
Chapter 88

04:40


Chapter 89
Chapter 89

04:50


Chapter 90
Chapter 90

07:07


Chapter 91
Chapter 91

05:09


Chapter 92
Chapter 92

06:57


Chapter 93
Chapter 93

05:11


Chapter 94
Chapter 94

05:01


Chapter 95
Chapter 95

04:53


Chapter 96
Chapter 96

05:17


Chapter 97
Chapter 97

07:24


Chapter 98
Chapter 98

06:03


Chapter 99
Chapter 99

06:09


Chapter 100
Chapter 100

06:58


Chapter 101
Chapter 101

05:34


Chapter 102
Chapter 102

03:38


Chapter 103
Chapter 103

04:51


Chapter 104
Chapter 104

08:22


Chapter 105
Chapter 105

05:26


Chapter 106
Chapter 106

06:48


Chapter 107
Chapter 107

05:30


Chapter 108
Chapter 108

04:13


Chapter 109
Chapter 109

08:04


Chapter 110
Chapter 110

06:00


Chapter 111
Chapter 111

06:00


Chapter 112
Chapter 112

04:30


Chapter 113
Chapter 113

04:44


Chapter 114
Chapter 114

07:05


Chapter 115
Chapter 115

05:41


Chapter 116
Chapter 116

06:05


Chapter 117
Chapter 117

05:31


Chapter 118
Chapter 118

05:10


Chapter 119
Chapter 119

04:34


Chapter 120
Chapter 120

05:44


Chapter 121
Chapter 121

00:28