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Blood Done Sign My Name - A True Story-logo

Blood Done Sign My Name - A True Story

Timothy B. Tyson

"Daddy and Roger and 'em shot 'em a nigger." Those words, whispered to ten-year-old Tim Tyson by one of his playmates in the late spring of 1970, heralded a firestorm that would forever transform the small tobacco market town of Oxford, North Carolina. On May 11, 1970, Henry Marrow, a 23-year-old black veteran, walked into a crossroads store owned by Robert Teel, a rough man with a criminal record and ties to the Ku Klux Klan, and came out running. Teel and two of his sons chased Marrow, beat him unmercifully, and killed him in public as he pleaded for his life. In the words of a local prosecutor: "They shot him like you or I would kill a snake." Like many small Southern towns, Oxford had barely been touched by the civil rights movement. But in the wake of the killing, young African Americans took to the streets, led by 22-year-old Ben Chavis, a future president of the NAACP. As mass protests crowded the town square, a cluster of returning Vietnam veterans organized what one termed "a military operation." While lawyers battled in the courthouse that summer in a drama that one termed "a Perry Mason kind of thing," the Ku Klux Klan raged in the shadows and black veterans torched the town's tobacco warehouses. With large sections of the town in flames, Tyson's father, the pastor of Oxford's all-white Methodist church, pressed his congregation to widen their vision of humanity and pushed the town to come to terms with its bloody racial history. In the end, however, the Tyson family was forced to move away. Years later, historian Tim Tyson returned to Oxford to ask Robert Teel why he and his sons had killed Henry Marrow. "That nigger committed suicide, coming in here wanting to four-letter-word my daughter-in-law," Teel explained. The black radicals who burned much of Oxford also told Tim their stories. "It was like we had a cash register up there at the pool hall, just ringing up how much money we done cost these white people," one of them explained. "We knew if we cost 'em enough goddamn money they was gonna s

"Daddy and Roger and 'em shot 'em a nigger." Those words, whispered to ten-year-old Tim Tyson by one of his playmates in the late spring of 1970, heralded a firestorm that would forever transform the small tobacco market town of Oxford, North Carolina. On May 11, 1970, Henry Marrow, a 23-year-old black veteran, walked into a crossroads store owned by Robert Teel, a rough man with a criminal record and ties to the Ku Klux Klan, and came out running. Teel and two of his sons chased Marrow, beat him unmercifully, and killed him in public as he pleaded for his life. In the words of a local prosecutor: "They shot him like you or I would kill a snake." Like many small Southern towns, Oxford had barely been touched by the civil rights movement. But in the wake of the killing, young African Americans took to the streets, led by 22-year-old Ben Chavis, a future president of the NAACP. As mass protests crowded the town square, a cluster of returning Vietnam veterans organized what one termed "a military operation." While lawyers battled in the courthouse that summer in a drama that one termed "a Perry Mason kind of thing," the Ku Klux Klan raged in the shadows and black veterans torched the town's tobacco warehouses. With large sections of the town in flames, Tyson's father, the pastor of Oxford's all-white Methodist church, pressed his congregation to widen their vision of humanity and pushed the town to come to terms with its bloody racial history. In the end, however, the Tyson family was forced to move away. Years later, historian Tim Tyson returned to Oxford to ask Robert Teel why he and his sons had killed Henry Marrow. "That nigger committed suicide, coming in here wanting to four-letter-word my daughter-in-law," Teel explained. The black radicals who burned much of Oxford also told Tim their stories. "It was like we had a cash register up there at the pool hall, just ringing up how much money we done cost these white people," one of them explained. "We knew if we cost 'em enough goddamn money they was gonna s
More Information

Description:

"Daddy and Roger and 'em shot 'em a nigger." Those words, whispered to ten-year-old Tim Tyson by one of his playmates in the late spring of 1970, heralded a firestorm that would forever transform the small tobacco market town of Oxford, North Carolina. On May 11, 1970, Henry Marrow, a 23-year-old black veteran, walked into a crossroads store owned by Robert Teel, a rough man with a criminal record and ties to the Ku Klux Klan, and came out running. Teel and two of his sons chased Marrow, beat him unmercifully, and killed him in public as he pleaded for his life. In the words of a local prosecutor: "They shot him like you or I would kill a snake." Like many small Southern towns, Oxford had barely been touched by the civil rights movement. But in the wake of the killing, young African Americans took to the streets, led by 22-year-old Ben Chavis, a future president of the NAACP. As mass protests crowded the town square, a cluster of returning Vietnam veterans organized what one termed "a military operation." While lawyers battled in the courthouse that summer in a drama that one termed "a Perry Mason kind of thing," the Ku Klux Klan raged in the shadows and black veterans torched the town's tobacco warehouses. With large sections of the town in flames, Tyson's father, the pastor of Oxford's all-white Methodist church, pressed his congregation to widen their vision of humanity and pushed the town to come to terms with its bloody racial history. In the end, however, the Tyson family was forced to move away. Years later, historian Tim Tyson returned to Oxford to ask Robert Teel why he and his sons had killed Henry Marrow. "That nigger committed suicide, coming in here wanting to four-letter-word my daughter-in-law," Teel explained. The black radicals who burned much of Oxford also told Tim their stories. "It was like we had a cash register up there at the pool hall, just ringing up how much money we done cost these white people," one of them explained. "We knew if we cost 'em enough goddamn money they was gonna s

Language:

English

Length:

5h 55m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

06:45


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

05:34


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

05:54


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

05:41


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:38


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

05:23


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

06:57


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:55


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

05:57


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

05:38


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

05:29


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

06:22


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

05:55


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

05:51


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

06:06


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

05:32


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

05:56


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

05:39


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

05:49


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

05:58


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

05:48


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

05:41


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

05:55


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

05:49


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

05:46


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

06:26


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

06:03


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

05:41


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

06:45


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

05:52


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

05:58


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

05:54


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

05:42


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

06:23


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

06:09


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

05:17


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

05:32


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:20


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

05:55


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:58


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

05:51


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

06:19


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

06:17


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

05:07


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

06:09


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

06:32


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

05:20


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

06:07


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

05:55


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

05:37


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

05:48


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

06:21


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

05:30


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

05:33


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

05:44


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

06:50


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

05:42


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

05:33


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

05:02


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

06:31