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Chatter - Uncovering the Echelon Surveillance Network and the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping-logo

Chatter - Uncovering the Echelon Surveillance Network and the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping

Patrick Radden Keefe

How does our government eavesdrop? Whom do they eavesdrop on? And is the interception of communication an effective means of predicting and preventing future attacks? These are some of the questions at the heart of Patrick Radden Keefe's brilliant new book, Chatter. In the late 1990s, when Keefe was a graduate student in England, he heard stories about an eavesdropping network led by the United States that spanned the planet. The system, known as Echelon, allowed America and its allies to intercept the private phone calls and e-mails of civilians and governments around the world. Taking the mystery of Echelon as his point of departure, Keefe explores the nature and context of communications interception, drawing together fascinating strands of history, fresh investigative reporting, and riveting, eye-opening anecdotes. The result is a bold and distinctive book, part detective story, part travel-writing, part essay on paranoia and secrecy in a digital age. Chatter starts out at Menwith Hill, a secret eavesdropping station covered in mysterious, gargantuan golf balls, in England's Yorkshire moors. From there, the narrative moves quickly to another American spy station hidden in the Australian outback; from the intelligence bureaucracy in Washington to the European Parliament in Brussels; from an abandoned National Security Agency base in the mountains of North Carolina to the remote Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia. As Keefe chases down the truth of contemporary surveillance by intelligence agencies, he unearths reams of little-known information and introduces us to a rogue's gallery of unforgettable characters. We meet a former British eavesdropper who now listens in on the United States Air Force for sport; an intelligence translator who risked prison to reveal an American operation to spy on the United Nations Security Council; a former member of the Senate committee on intelligence who says that oversight is so bad, a lot of senators only sit on the committee for the travel. Provocative, often funny, and

How does our government eavesdrop? Whom do they eavesdrop on? And is the interception of communication an effective means of predicting and preventing future attacks? These are some of the questions at the heart of Patrick Radden Keefe's brilliant new book, Chatter. In the late 1990s, when Keefe was a graduate student in England, he heard stories about an eavesdropping network led by the United States that spanned the planet. The system, known as Echelon, allowed America and its allies to intercept the private phone calls and e-mails of civilians and governments around the world. Taking the mystery of Echelon as his point of departure, Keefe explores the nature and context of communications interception, drawing together fascinating strands of history, fresh investigative reporting, and riveting, eye-opening anecdotes. The result is a bold and distinctive book, part detective story, part travel-writing, part essay on paranoia and secrecy in a digital age. Chatter starts out at Menwith Hill, a secret eavesdropping station covered in mysterious, gargantuan golf balls, in England's Yorkshire moors. From there, the narrative moves quickly to another American spy station hidden in the Australian outback; from the intelligence bureaucracy in Washington to the European Parliament in Brussels; from an abandoned National Security Agency base in the mountains of North Carolina to the remote Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia. As Keefe chases down the truth of contemporary surveillance by intelligence agencies, he unearths reams of little-known information and introduces us to a rogue's gallery of unforgettable characters. We meet a former British eavesdropper who now listens in on the United States Air Force for sport; an intelligence translator who risked prison to reveal an American operation to spy on the United Nations Security Council; a former member of the Senate committee on intelligence who says that oversight is so bad, a lot of senators only sit on the committee for the travel. Provocative, often funny, and
More Information

Description:

How does our government eavesdrop? Whom do they eavesdrop on? And is the interception of communication an effective means of predicting and preventing future attacks? These are some of the questions at the heart of Patrick Radden Keefe's brilliant new book, Chatter. In the late 1990s, when Keefe was a graduate student in England, he heard stories about an eavesdropping network led by the United States that spanned the planet. The system, known as Echelon, allowed America and its allies to intercept the private phone calls and e-mails of civilians and governments around the world. Taking the mystery of Echelon as his point of departure, Keefe explores the nature and context of communications interception, drawing together fascinating strands of history, fresh investigative reporting, and riveting, eye-opening anecdotes. The result is a bold and distinctive book, part detective story, part travel-writing, part essay on paranoia and secrecy in a digital age. Chatter starts out at Menwith Hill, a secret eavesdropping station covered in mysterious, gargantuan golf balls, in England's Yorkshire moors. From there, the narrative moves quickly to another American spy station hidden in the Australian outback; from the intelligence bureaucracy in Washington to the European Parliament in Brussels; from an abandoned National Security Agency base in the mountains of North Carolina to the remote Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia. As Keefe chases down the truth of contemporary surveillance by intelligence agencies, he unearths reams of little-known information and introduces us to a rogue's gallery of unforgettable characters. We meet a former British eavesdropper who now listens in on the United States Air Force for sport; an intelligence translator who risked prison to reveal an American operation to spy on the United Nations Security Council; a former member of the Senate committee on intelligence who says that oversight is so bad, a lot of senators only sit on the committee for the travel. Provocative, often funny, and

Language:

English

Length:

5h 53m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

06:50


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

06:52


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

06:43


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

07:02


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:56


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

05:48


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

06:39


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:30


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

06:37


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

07:07


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

05:30


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

06:25


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:37


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

05:59


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

06:30


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

06:32


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

05:52


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

05:41


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

06:11


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

06:18


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

05:54


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

06:47


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

04:00


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

06:23


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

07:35


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

06:51


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

06:10


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

06:54


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

06:46


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

06:38


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

07:04


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

07:02


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

06:15


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

04:55


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

07:15


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

06:52


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

06:32


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:35


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

06:15


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:59


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

06:26


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

06:47


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

06:38


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

04:29


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

03:51


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

04:17


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

06:42


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

06:46


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

05:59


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

06:10


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

06:58


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

06:06


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

05:29


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

05:43


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

07:12


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

07:08