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Childe Harold's Pilgrimage  - Cantos III & IV-logo

Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - Cantos III & IV

Lord Byron

With Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, cantos III and IV, Byron comes to the high point of his work and to clear and definite mastery of his art as a poet. Though he himself doubts his powers - he says his visions no longer swim so palpably before his eyes as once they did - his visions are far more palpable to us, expressed as they are with the full depth of his romantic and passionate feelings. He continues the device of the journey of the fictional Harold, but Harold is almost a ghost; the thin disguise and facade that separates him from the poet essentially vanishes. Even the concept of his pilgrimage fades; Byron is not concerned nearly as much with places and people in this canto as he is with art and ideas. The place that means the most to him is no longer a human habitation, but the world of Nature, in which the inmost depths of his heart is reflected. He writes, "There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar: I love not man the less, but Nature more, From these our interviews, in which I steal From all I may be, or have been before, To mingle with the Universe, and feel What I can ne'er express, yet cannot all conceal." Byron spends this last portion of his pilgrimage in that special place, that realm of the spirit and the soul, where what matters is the highest achievements of art. Out of that place is his poem made. Public Domain (P)2010 Robert Bethune A Freshwater Seas production.

With Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, cantos III and IV, Byron comes to the high point of his work and to clear and definite mastery of his art as a poet. Though he himself doubts his powers - he says his visions no longer swim so palpably before his eyes as once they did - his visions are far more palpable to us, expressed as they are with the full depth of his romantic and passionate feelings. He continues the device of the journey of the fictional Harold, but Harold is almost a ghost; the thin disguise and facade that separates him from the poet essentially vanishes. Even the concept of his pilgrimage fades; Byron is not concerned nearly as much with places and people in this canto as he is with art and ideas. The place that means the most to him is no longer a human habitation, but the world of Nature, in which the inmost depths of his heart is reflected. He writes, "There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar: I love not man the less, but Nature more, From these our interviews, in which I steal From all I may be, or have been before, To mingle with the Universe, and feel What I can ne'er express, yet cannot all conceal." Byron spends this last portion of his pilgrimage in that special place, that realm of the spirit and the soul, where what matters is the highest achievements of art. Out of that place is his poem made. Public Domain (P)2010 Robert Bethune A Freshwater Seas production.
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Description:

With Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, cantos III and IV, Byron comes to the high point of his work and to clear and definite mastery of his art as a poet. Though he himself doubts his powers - he says his visions no longer swim so palpably before his eyes as once they did - his visions are far more palpable to us, expressed as they are with the full depth of his romantic and passionate feelings. He continues the device of the journey of the fictional Harold, but Harold is almost a ghost; the thin disguise and facade that separates him from the poet essentially vanishes. Even the concept of his pilgrimage fades; Byron is not concerned nearly as much with places and people in this canto as he is with art and ideas. The place that means the most to him is no longer a human habitation, but the world of Nature, in which the inmost depths of his heart is reflected. He writes, "There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar: I love not man the less, but Nature more, From these our interviews, in which I steal From all I may be, or have been before, To mingle with the Universe, and feel What I can ne'er express, yet cannot all conceal." Byron spends this last portion of his pilgrimage in that special place, that realm of the spirit and the soul, where what matters is the highest achievements of art. Out of that place is his poem made. Public Domain (P)2010 Robert Bethune A Freshwater Seas production.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Robert Bethune

Length:

2h 49m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

08:27


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

07:52


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

08:17


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

08:27


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:41


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

08:19


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:59


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

08:06


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

04:57


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

07:28


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

15:02


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

10:14


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

05:56


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

08:36


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

08:44


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

07:46


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

08:11


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

07:01


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

08:12


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

07:27


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

05:24


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

00:45