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Claude Lévi-Strauss's Structural anthropology-logo

Claude Lévi-Strauss's Structural anthropology

Claude Levi-Strauss

Structural Anthropology (1958) not only transformed the discipline of anthropology, it also energized a movement called structuralism that came to dominate the humanities and social sciences for a generation. Linguistic structuralism studies the meaning of language beyond definitions, looking at the relationships of words and sounds to each other. Lévi-Strauss’s insight was to apply this concept of structuralism to anthropology as well. He saw that while some cultures are very different from others, they all seem to have certain internal structural relationships in common. By tracing these structures across cultures, he tried to answer nothing less than the eternal question: “What is Man?”

Structural Anthropology (1958) not only transformed the discipline of anthropology, it also energized a movement called structuralism that came to dominate the humanities and social sciences for a generation. Linguistic structuralism studies the meaning of language beyond definitions, looking at the relationships of words and sounds to each other. Lévi-Strauss’s insight was to apply this concept of structuralism to anthropology as well. He saw that while some cultures are very different from others, they all seem to have certain internal structural relationships in common. By tracing these structures across cultures, he tried to answer nothing less than the eternal question: “What is Man?”
More Information

Description:

Structural Anthropology (1958) not only transformed the discipline of anthropology, it also energized a movement called structuralism that came to dominate the humanities and social sciences for a generation. Linguistic structuralism studies the meaning of language beyond definitions, looking at the relationships of words and sounds to each other. Lévi-Strauss’s insight was to apply this concept of structuralism to anthropology as well. He saw that while some cultures are very different from others, they all seem to have certain internal structural relationships in common. By tracing these structures across cultures, he tried to answer nothing less than the eternal question: “What is Man?”

Language:

English

Narrators:

Jeffrey A. Becker, Macat.com

Length:

1h 31m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

09:51


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

07:36


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

05:58


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

06:44


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:35


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:01


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:50


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

07:32


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

07:21


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

06:49


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

06:13


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

04:54


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:39