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Country of the Pointed Firs

Sarah Orne Jewett

The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896) is considered Jewett’s finest work, described by Henry James as her “beautiful little quantum of achievement.” Despite James’s diminutives, the novel remains a classic. Because it is loosely structured, many critics view the book not as a novel, but a series of sketches; however, its structure is unified through both setting and theme. Jewett herself felt that her strengths as a writer lay not in plot development or dramatic tension, but in character development. Indeed, she determined early in her career to preserve a disappearing way of life, and her novel can be read as a study of the effects of isolation and hardship on the inhabitants who lived in the decaying fishing villages along the Maine coast. (summary from Gutenberg e-text)

The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896) is considered Jewett’s finest work, described by Henry James as her “beautiful little quantum of achievement.” Despite James’s diminutives, the novel remains a classic. Because it is loosely structured, many critics view the book not as a novel, but a series of sketches; however, its structure is unified through both setting and theme. Jewett herself felt that her strengths as a writer lay not in plot development or dramatic tension, but in character development. Indeed, she determined early in her career to preserve a disappearing way of life, and her novel can be read as a study of the effects of isolation and hardship on the inhabitants who lived in the decaying fishing villages along the Maine coast. (summary from Gutenberg e-text)
More Information

Genres:

History

Description:

The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896) is considered Jewett’s finest work, described by Henry James as her “beautiful little quantum of achievement.” Despite James’s diminutives, the novel remains a classic. Because it is loosely structured, many critics view the book not as a novel, but a series of sketches; however, its structure is unified through both setting and theme. Jewett herself felt that her strengths as a writer lay not in plot development or dramatic tension, but in character development. Indeed, she determined early in her career to preserve a disappearing way of life, and her novel can be read as a study of the effects of isolation and hardship on the inhabitants who lived in the decaying fishing villages along the Maine coast. (summary from Gutenberg e-text)

Language:

English

Narrators:

LibriVox Community

Length:

4h 25m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

11:21


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

05:36


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

06:44


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

14:20


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

13:57


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

06:58


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

21:59


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

06:59


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

10:51


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

08:05


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

13:45


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

20:16


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

14:15


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

07:59


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

12:41


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

13:43


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

26:29


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

11:52


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

28:32


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

09:21