Escape from the Land of Snows - The Young Dalai Lama's Harrowing Flight to Freedom and the Making of a Spiritual Hero-logo

Escape from the Land of Snows - The Young Dalai Lama's Harrowing Flight to Freedom and the Making of a Spiritual Hero

Stephan Talty

On the evening of March 17, 1959, as the people of Tibet braced for a violent power grab by Chinese occupiers-one that would forever wipe out any vestige of national sovereignty-the twenty-four-year-old Dalai Lama, Tibet's political and spiritual leader, contemplated the impossible. The task before him was immense: to slip past a cordon of crack Chinese troops ringing his summer palace and, with an escort of 300, journey across the highest terrain in the world and over treacherous Himalayan passes to freedom-one step ahead of pursuing Chinese soldiers. Mao Zedung, China's ruthless Communist dictator, had pinned his hopes for total Tibetan submission on controlling the impressionable Dalai Lama. So beloved was the young ruler-so identified with his country's essence-that for him to escape might mean perpetual resistance from a population unwilling to tolerate an increasingly brutal occupation. The Dalai Lama's minders sent word to the Tibetan rebels and CIA-trained guerrillas who waited on the route: His Holiness must escape-at all costs. In many ways, the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was unprepared for the epic journey awaiting him. Twenty-two years earlier, government search parties, guided by prophecies and omens, had arrived at the boy's humble peasant home and subjected the two-year-old to a series of tests. After being declared the reincarnation of Tibet's previous ruler, the boy was brought to Lhasa to learn the secrets of Buddhism and the ways of ultimate power. Forced in the ensuing two decades to cope with aching loneliness and often stifling ritual-and compelled to suppress his mischievous personality-Gyatso eventually proved himself a capable leader. But no previous Dalai Lama had ever taken on a million Communist Chinese soldiers bent on stamping out Tibetan freedom. To keep his country's dream of independence alive by means of a government in exile, the young ruler would not only have to brave battalions of enemy soldiers and the whiteout conditions waiting on the slopes of the Himalayas' highe

On the evening of March 17, 1959, as the people of Tibet braced for a violent power grab by Chinese occupiers-one that would forever wipe out any vestige of national sovereignty-the twenty-four-year-old Dalai Lama, Tibet's political and spiritual leader, contemplated the impossible. The task before him was immense: to slip past a cordon of crack Chinese troops ringing his summer palace and, with an escort of 300, journey across the highest terrain in the world and over treacherous Himalayan passes to freedom-one step ahead of pursuing Chinese soldiers. Mao Zedung, China's ruthless Communist dictator, had pinned his hopes for total Tibetan submission on controlling the impressionable Dalai Lama. So beloved was the young ruler-so identified with his country's essence-that for him to escape might mean perpetual resistance from a population unwilling to tolerate an increasingly brutal occupation. The Dalai Lama's minders sent word to the Tibetan rebels and CIA-trained guerrillas who waited on the route: His Holiness must escape-at all costs. In many ways, the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was unprepared for the epic journey awaiting him. Twenty-two years earlier, government search parties, guided by prophecies and omens, had arrived at the boy's humble peasant home and subjected the two-year-old to a series of tests. After being declared the reincarnation of Tibet's previous ruler, the boy was brought to Lhasa to learn the secrets of Buddhism and the ways of ultimate power. Forced in the ensuing two decades to cope with aching loneliness and often stifling ritual-and compelled to suppress his mischievous personality-Gyatso eventually proved himself a capable leader. But no previous Dalai Lama had ever taken on a million Communist Chinese soldiers bent on stamping out Tibetan freedom. To keep his country's dream of independence alive by means of a government in exile, the young ruler would not only have to brave battalions of enemy soldiers and the whiteout conditions waiting on the slopes of the Himalayas' highe
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Description:

On the evening of March 17, 1959, as the people of Tibet braced for a violent power grab by Chinese occupiers-one that would forever wipe out any vestige of national sovereignty-the twenty-four-year-old Dalai Lama, Tibet's political and spiritual leader, contemplated the impossible. The task before him was immense: to slip past a cordon of crack Chinese troops ringing his summer palace and, with an escort of 300, journey across the highest terrain in the world and over treacherous Himalayan passes to freedom-one step ahead of pursuing Chinese soldiers. Mao Zedung, China's ruthless Communist dictator, had pinned his hopes for total Tibetan submission on controlling the impressionable Dalai Lama. So beloved was the young ruler-so identified with his country's essence-that for him to escape might mean perpetual resistance from a population unwilling to tolerate an increasingly brutal occupation. The Dalai Lama's minders sent word to the Tibetan rebels and CIA-trained guerrillas who waited on the route: His Holiness must escape-at all costs. In many ways, the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was unprepared for the epic journey awaiting him. Twenty-two years earlier, government search parties, guided by prophecies and omens, had arrived at the boy's humble peasant home and subjected the two-year-old to a series of tests. After being declared the reincarnation of Tibet's previous ruler, the boy was brought to Lhasa to learn the secrets of Buddhism and the ways of ultimate power. Forced in the ensuing two decades to cope with aching loneliness and often stifling ritual-and compelled to suppress his mischievous personality-Gyatso eventually proved himself a capable leader. But no previous Dalai Lama had ever taken on a million Communist Chinese soldiers bent on stamping out Tibetan freedom. To keep his country's dream of independence alive by means of a government in exile, the young ruler would not only have to brave battalions of enemy soldiers and the whiteout conditions waiting on the slopes of the Himalayas' highe

Language:

English

Narrators:

Shishir Kurup

Length:

8h 49m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:20


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

00:10


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

09:30


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

08:16


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:34


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

06:27


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

05:05


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:26


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

07:22


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

07:54


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

07:39


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

05:54


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:28


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:42


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

06:46


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

07:35


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

06:24


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

05:45


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:18


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

07:13


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

07:11


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

07:43


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

06:58


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

05:29


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

05:13


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

07:08


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

08:21


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

06:22


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:29


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

08:34


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

06:44


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

08:31


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

08:53


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

05:25


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

04:42


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

08:20


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

07:37


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:53


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

07:31


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

09:08


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

06:56


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

07:47


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

08:59


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

05:55


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

05:15


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

07:48


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

07:38


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

08:03


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

08:09


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

07:50


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

09:14


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

07:06


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

07:35


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

06:40


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

07:05


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

04:45


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

08:09


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

07:06


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

07:14


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

06:56


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

09:30


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

07:44


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

06:11


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

07:43


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

05:19


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

05:38


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

07:57


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

08:38


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

07:31


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

07:28


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

08:13


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

07:52


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

07:38


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

05:53


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

04:16


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

06:29


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

00:40