Essay on the Trial by Jury-logo

Essay on the Trial by Jury

Lysander Spooner

FOR more than six hundred years that is, since Magna Carta, in 1215 there has been no clearer principle of English or American constitutional law, than that, in criminal cases, it is not only the right and duty of juries to judge what are the facts, what is the law, and what was the moral intent of the accused; but that it is also their right, and their primary and paramount duty, to judge of the justice of the law, and to hold all laws invalid, that are, in their opinion, unjust or oppressive, and all persons guiltless in violating, or resisting the execution of, such laws. So begins Spooner's epic on the jury, its origins and history. Spooner examines the history and powers of a jury, from the magna carta in King John's time, to the practices in the 18th century. A classic work on law, Spooner argues that the decision of the jury is sovereign over the king's law. (Summary by Bethanne)

FOR more than six hundred years that is, since Magna Carta, in 1215 there has been no clearer principle of English or American constitutional law, than that, in criminal cases, it is not only the right and duty of juries to judge what are the facts, what is the law, and what was the moral intent of the accused; but that it is also their right, and their primary and paramount duty, to judge of the justice of the law, and to hold all laws invalid, that are, in their opinion, unjust or oppressive, and all persons guiltless in violating, or resisting the execution of, such laws. So begins Spooner's epic on the jury, its origins and history. Spooner examines the history and powers of a jury, from the magna carta in King John's time, to the practices in the 18th century. A classic work on law, Spooner argues that the decision of the jury is sovereign over the king's law. (Summary by Bethanne)
More Information

Genres:

History

Description:

FOR more than six hundred years that is, since Magna Carta, in 1215 there has been no clearer principle of English or American constitutional law, than that, in criminal cases, it is not only the right and duty of juries to judge what are the facts, what is the law, and what was the moral intent of the accused; but that it is also their right, and their primary and paramount duty, to judge of the justice of the law, and to hold all laws invalid, that are, in their opinion, unjust or oppressive, and all persons guiltless in violating, or resisting the execution of, such laws. So begins Spooner's epic on the jury, its origins and history. Spooner examines the history and powers of a jury, from the magna carta in King John's time, to the practices in the 18th century. A classic work on law, Spooner argues that the decision of the jury is sovereign over the king's law. (Summary by Bethanne)

Language:

English

Narrators:

LibriVox Community

Length:

11h 29m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

02:56


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

43:16


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

53:40


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

49:17


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

41:28


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

23:32


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

44:00


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

30:12


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

33:32


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

25:51


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

39:15


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

26:59


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

25:18


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

43:42


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

26:28


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

33:39


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

15:07


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

31:47


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:11


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

41:05


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

41:32


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

09:17