Eye of the Beholder - Johannes Vermeer, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing-logo

Eye of the Beholder - Johannes Vermeer, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing

Laura J. Snyder

"See for yourself!" was the clarion call of the 1600's. Natural philosophers threw off the yoke of ancient authority, peered at nature with microscopes and telescopes, and ignited the Scientific Revolution. Artists investigated nature with lenses and created paintings filled with realistic effects of light and shadow. The hub of this optical innovation was the small Dutch city of Delft. Here Johannes Vermeer's experiments with lenses and a camera obscura taught him how we see under different conditions of light and helped him create the most luminous works of art ever beheld. Meanwhile, his neighbor Antoni van Leeuwenhoek's work with microscopes revealed a previously unimagined realm of minuscule creatures. The results was a transformation in both art and science the revolutionized how we see the world today.

"See for yourself!" was the clarion call of the 1600's. Natural philosophers threw off the yoke of ancient authority, peered at nature with microscopes and telescopes, and ignited the Scientific Revolution. Artists investigated nature with lenses and created paintings filled with realistic effects of light and shadow. The hub of this optical innovation was the small Dutch city of Delft. Here Johannes Vermeer's experiments with lenses and a camera obscura taught him how we see under different conditions of light and helped him create the most luminous works of art ever beheld. Meanwhile, his neighbor Antoni van Leeuwenhoek's work with microscopes revealed a previously unimagined realm of minuscule creatures. The results was a transformation in both art and science the revolutionized how we see the world today.
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Description:

"See for yourself!" was the clarion call of the 1600's. Natural philosophers threw off the yoke of ancient authority, peered at nature with microscopes and telescopes, and ignited the Scientific Revolution. Artists investigated nature with lenses and created paintings filled with realistic effects of light and shadow. The hub of this optical innovation was the small Dutch city of Delft. Here Johannes Vermeer's experiments with lenses and a camera obscura taught him how we see under different conditions of light and helped him create the most luminous works of art ever beheld. Meanwhile, his neighbor Antoni van Leeuwenhoek's work with microscopes revealed a previously unimagined realm of minuscule creatures. The results was a transformation in both art and science the revolutionized how we see the world today.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Tamara Marston

Length:

13h 35m


Chapters

Free Sample

05:00

Introduction
Introduction

30:59


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

37:25


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

40:01


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

54:48


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

44:56


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

38:49


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

34:03


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

26:54


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

42:00


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

48:12


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

54:21


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

34:45


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

32:42


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

55:20


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

43:36


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

52:44


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

50:10


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

50:48


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

35:01


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:42