Fugitive Pieces - Poetry of Lord Byron-logo

Fugitive Pieces - Poetry of Lord Byron

Lord Byron

George Gordon, later Lord Byron, published Fugitive Pieces in 1806 when he was only 18 years old. It was printed, but Byron's friends - particularly Reverend Thomas Beecher - advised him that it contained poems that were scandalously amorous, particularly the poem To Mary. Byron suppressed it by having all the copies destroyed - or so he thought. As it happened, Thomas Beecher himself kept his copy, and there were three other copies that were not destroyed. Reverend Beecher's opinion was certainly correct, though his advice was inexcusable. The amorous poetry in this volume, particularly To Mary, is some of the most erotic serious poetry in English up to that time. Byron was an intensely emotional, intensely sexual young man, and his poetry shows it very clearly. It also shows the work of a young man with the makings of not only a serious poet, but a skillful satirist and humorist as well. While many of the poems are deeply romantic, indeed rather melodramatic effusions of the sort one would expect from the young man who would become a founder of the Romantic movement, others read more like Ogden Nash—witty, lively and skillfully done in happy, bouncing rhymes and meters, not at all what one might expect. This recording of the volume Fugitive Pieces is based on the original volume as later published in limited-edition form. For that reason, the reader who knows Byron’s poetry well will notice that some of the texts used here differ, sometimes markedly, from the versions more commonly found. Byron revised and republished these early poems several times under several titles, most notably Pieces on Various Occasions and Hours of Idleness. Later titles in this series, which aims to present the whole of Byron’s poetry, will use the later versions of these same poems. In some cases the two versions are nearly identical. A Freshwater Seas production.

George Gordon, later Lord Byron, published Fugitive Pieces in 1806 when he was only 18 years old. It was printed, but Byron's friends - particularly Reverend Thomas Beecher - advised him that it contained poems that were scandalously amorous, particularly the poem To Mary. Byron suppressed it by having all the copies destroyed - or so he thought. As it happened, Thomas Beecher himself kept his copy, and there were three other copies that were not destroyed. Reverend Beecher's opinion was certainly correct, though his advice was inexcusable. The amorous poetry in this volume, particularly To Mary, is some of the most erotic serious poetry in English up to that time. Byron was an intensely emotional, intensely sexual young man, and his poetry shows it very clearly. It also shows the work of a young man with the makings of not only a serious poet, but a skillful satirist and humorist as well. While many of the poems are deeply romantic, indeed rather melodramatic effusions of the sort one would expect from the young man who would become a founder of the Romantic movement, others read more like Ogden Nash—witty, lively and skillfully done in happy, bouncing rhymes and meters, not at all what one might expect. This recording of the volume Fugitive Pieces is based on the original volume as later published in limited-edition form. For that reason, the reader who knows Byron’s poetry well will notice that some of the texts used here differ, sometimes markedly, from the versions more commonly found. Byron revised and republished these early poems several times under several titles, most notably Pieces on Various Occasions and Hours of Idleness. Later titles in this series, which aims to present the whole of Byron’s poetry, will use the later versions of these same poems. In some cases the two versions are nearly identical. A Freshwater Seas production.
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Description:

George Gordon, later Lord Byron, published Fugitive Pieces in 1806 when he was only 18 years old. It was printed, but Byron's friends - particularly Reverend Thomas Beecher - advised him that it contained poems that were scandalously amorous, particularly the poem To Mary. Byron suppressed it by having all the copies destroyed - or so he thought. As it happened, Thomas Beecher himself kept his copy, and there were three other copies that were not destroyed. Reverend Beecher's opinion was certainly correct, though his advice was inexcusable. The amorous poetry in this volume, particularly To Mary, is some of the most erotic serious poetry in English up to that time. Byron was an intensely emotional, intensely sexual young man, and his poetry shows it very clearly. It also shows the work of a young man with the makings of not only a serious poet, but a skillful satirist and humorist as well. While many of the poems are deeply romantic, indeed rather melodramatic effusions of the sort one would expect from the young man who would become a founder of the Romantic movement, others read more like Ogden Nash—witty, lively and skillfully done in happy, bouncing rhymes and meters, not at all what one might expect. This recording of the volume Fugitive Pieces is based on the original volume as later published in limited-edition form. For that reason, the reader who knows Byron’s poetry well will notice that some of the texts used here differ, sometimes markedly, from the versions more commonly found. Byron revised and republished these early poems several times under several titles, most notably Pieces on Various Occasions and Hours of Idleness. Later titles in this series, which aims to present the whole of Byron’s poetry, will use the later versions of these same poems. In some cases the two versions are nearly identical. A Freshwater Seas production.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Robert Bethune

Length:

1h 13m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:57


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

02:24


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

00:40


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

01:46


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

00:45


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

01:26


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

02:25


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

02:03


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

01:09


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

01:23


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

01:13


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

01:49


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

00:46


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

03:04


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

00:49


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

01:46


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

02:01


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

02:35


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

03:48


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

01:44


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

02:27


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

02:24


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

03:03


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

02:07


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

01:23


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

02:11


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

02:37


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

02:45


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

01:59


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

04:43


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

02:16


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

01:34


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

01:28


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

02:06


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

01:24


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

00:29


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

00:42


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

01:24


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

00:49


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

00:56