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Hume's Dialogues

David Hume

David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion had not yet been published when he died in 1776. Even though the manuscript was mostly written during the 1750s, it did not appear until 1779. The subject itself was too delicate and controversial, and Hume's dialectical examination of religious knowledge was especially provocative. What should we teach young people about religion? The characters Demea, Cleanthes, and Philo passionately present and defend three sharply different answers to that question. Demea opens the dialogue with a position derived from René Descartes and Father Malebranche - God's nature is a mystery, but God's existence can be proved logically. Cleanthes attacks that view, both because it leads to mysticism and because it attempts the impossible task of trying to establish existence on the basis of pure reason, without appeal to sense experience. As an alternative, he offers a proof both God's existence and God's nature based on the same kind of scientific reasoning established by Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. Taking a skeptical approach, Philo presents a series of arguments that question any attempt to use reason as a basis for religious faith. He suggests that human beings might be better off without religion. The dialogue ends without agreement among the characters, justifying Hume's choice of dialogue as the literary style for this topic. © Agora Publications

David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion had not yet been published when he died in 1776. Even though the manuscript was mostly written during the 1750s, it did not appear until 1779. The subject itself was too delicate and controversial, and Hume's dialectical examination of religious knowledge was especially provocative. What should we teach young people about religion? The characters Demea, Cleanthes, and Philo passionately present and defend three sharply different answers to that question. Demea opens the dialogue with a position derived from René Descartes and Father Malebranche - God's nature is a mystery, but God's existence can be proved logically. Cleanthes attacks that view, both because it leads to mysticism and because it attempts the impossible task of trying to establish existence on the basis of pure reason, without appeal to sense experience. As an alternative, he offers a proof both God's existence and God's nature based on the same kind of scientific reasoning established by Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. Taking a skeptical approach, Philo presents a series of arguments that question any attempt to use reason as a basis for religious faith. He suggests that human beings might be better off without religion. The dialogue ends without agreement among the characters, justifying Hume's choice of dialogue as the literary style for this topic. © Agora Publications
More Information

Genres:

Philosophy

Description:

David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion had not yet been published when he died in 1776. Even though the manuscript was mostly written during the 1750s, it did not appear until 1779. The subject itself was too delicate and controversial, and Hume's dialectical examination of religious knowledge was especially provocative. What should we teach young people about religion? The characters Demea, Cleanthes, and Philo passionately present and defend three sharply different answers to that question. Demea opens the dialogue with a position derived from René Descartes and Father Malebranche - God's nature is a mystery, but God's existence can be proved logically. Cleanthes attacks that view, both because it leads to mysticism and because it attempts the impossible task of trying to establish existence on the basis of pure reason, without appeal to sense experience. As an alternative, he offers a proof both God's existence and God's nature based on the same kind of scientific reasoning established by Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. Taking a skeptical approach, Philo presents a series of arguments that question any attempt to use reason as a basis for religious faith. He suggests that human beings might be better off without religion. The dialogue ends without agreement among the characters, justifying Hume's choice of dialogue as the literary style for this topic. © Agora Publications

Language:

English

Narrators:

Ray Childs

Length:

4h 19m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

03:01


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

03:01


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

03:07


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:03


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

02:40


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

03:01


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

04:04


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

02:55


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

02:58


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

02:41


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

03:02


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

04:03


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

02:27


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

02:51


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

03:13


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

02:37


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

02:28


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

03:04


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

02:58


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

02:52


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

03:20


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

01:44


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

02:58


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

03:10


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

03:09


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

03:01


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

03:41


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

02:54


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

03:01


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

03:27


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

02:55


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:09


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

01:09


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

03:01


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

03:22


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

03:17


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

02:05


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

03:04


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

02:47


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

02:39


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

02:06


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

03:21


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

00:36


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

02:39


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

02:45


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

02:54


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

03:29


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

02:18


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

03:11


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

03:42


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

03:54


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

02:54


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

04:06


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

03:56


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

04:10


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

03:20


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

03:52


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

03:09


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

03:12


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

02:43


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

01:50


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

03:28


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

02:39


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

03:45


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

03:01


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

03:42


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

03:30


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

02:50


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

03:13


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

02:41


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

02:12


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

02:54


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

03:05


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

03:10


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

02:35


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

03:12


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

03:14


Chapter 78
Chapter 78

04:11


Chapter 79
Chapter 79

03:11


Chapter 80
Chapter 80

02:58


Chapter 81
Chapter 81

02:57


Chapter 82
Chapter 82

03:12


Chapter 83
Chapter 83

02:55


Chapter 84
Chapter 84

02:44


Chapter 85
Chapter 85

02:30


Chapter 86
Chapter 86

01:55


Chapter 87
Chapter 87

01:38