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John Locke's Two Treatises of Government-logo

John Locke's Two Treatises of Government

John Locke

Published anonymously by Locke in 1689, Two Treatises claims that a monarch’s right to rule does not come from God, but from the people he rules. In the mid-seventeenth century, England removed its king and tried different systems of government before opting to restore a monarchy. This turmoil prompted Locke to explore where a king’s power comes from. He decided that a sovereign is there to keep order in society, and people enter into a “contract” with him wherein he protects the people and keeps order in return for their support. But if that sovereign does not take his responsibilities seriously and obey the law himself, someone else should rule.

Published anonymously by Locke in 1689, Two Treatises claims that a monarch’s right to rule does not come from God, but from the people he rules. In the mid-seventeenth century, England removed its king and tried different systems of government before opting to restore a monarchy. This turmoil prompted Locke to explore where a king’s power comes from. He decided that a sovereign is there to keep order in society, and people enter into a “contract” with him wherein he protects the people and keeps order in return for their support. But if that sovereign does not take his responsibilities seriously and obey the law himself, someone else should rule.
More Information

Description:

Published anonymously by Locke in 1689, Two Treatises claims that a monarch’s right to rule does not come from God, but from the people he rules. In the mid-seventeenth century, England removed its king and tried different systems of government before opting to restore a monarchy. This turmoil prompted Locke to explore where a king’s power comes from. He decided that a sovereign is there to keep order in society, and people enter into a “contract” with him wherein he protects the people and keeps order in return for their support. But if that sovereign does not take his responsibilities seriously and obey the law himself, someone else should rule.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Jeremy Kleidosty, Macat.com

Length:

1h 47m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

11:40


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

07:59


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

07:30


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

07:04


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

09:54


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

08:47


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:12


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

08:25


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

08:16


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

08:31


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

08:14


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

06:59


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:30