Leelinau, the Lost Daughter-logo

Leelinau, the Lost Daughter

unknown

“Leelinau, the Lost Daughter” is a story about a little girl who passed much of her time in solitude and seemed ever to prefer the companionship of her own shadow to the society. Whenever she could leave her father's lodge she would fly to remote haunts and recesses in the woods, or sit in lonely reverie upon some high promontory of rock overlooking the lake. But amid all the leafy haunts, none drew her steps toward it so often as a forest of pines, on the open shore, called Manitowok, or the Sacred Wood. It was one of those hallowed places which are the resort of the little wild men of the woods, and of the turtle spirits or fairies which delight in romantic scenes. And Leelinau spent so much time in Manitowok that her parents started to worry about their daughter.

“Leelinau, the Lost Daughter” is a story about a little girl who passed much of her time in solitude and seemed ever to prefer the companionship of her own shadow to the society. Whenever she could leave her father's lodge she would fly to remote haunts and recesses in the woods, or sit in lonely reverie upon some high promontory of rock overlooking the lake. But amid all the leafy haunts, none drew her steps toward it so often as a forest of pines, on the open shore, called Manitowok, or the Sacred Wood. It was one of those hallowed places which are the resort of the little wild men of the woods, and of the turtle spirits or fairies which delight in romantic scenes. And Leelinau spent so much time in Manitowok that her parents started to worry about their daughter.
More Information

Description:

“Leelinau, the Lost Daughter” is a story about a little girl who passed much of her time in solitude and seemed ever to prefer the companionship of her own shadow to the society. Whenever she could leave her father's lodge she would fly to remote haunts and recesses in the woods, or sit in lonely reverie upon some high promontory of rock overlooking the lake. But amid all the leafy haunts, none drew her steps toward it so often as a forest of pines, on the open shore, called Manitowok, or the Sacred Wood. It was one of those hallowed places which are the resort of the little wild men of the woods, and of the turtle spirits or fairies which delight in romantic scenes. And Leelinau spent so much time in Manitowok that her parents started to worry about their daughter.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Anastasia Bertollo

Length:

13m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

13:38