Lincoln's Body - A Cultural History-logo

Lincoln's Body - A Cultural History

Richard Wightman Fox

Nineteenth-century African Americans felt deep affection for their “liberator” as a “homely” man who did not hold himself apart; Southerners felt a nostalgia for Abraham Lincoln as a humble “conciliator.” Later, educators glorified Lincoln as a symbol of nationhood to help assimilate poor immigrants. Monument makers focused not only on a gigantic body but also on a nationalist “union,” downplaying “emancipation.” Among both black and white liberals in the 1960s and 1970s, Lincoln was derided or fell out of fashion. Recently, Lincoln has been embodied once again (as idealist and pragmatist) by outstanding historians, by self-identified Lincolnian president Barack Obama, and by actor Daniel Day-Lewis—all keeping Lincoln alive in a body of memory that speaks volumes about our nation.

Nineteenth-century African Americans felt deep affection for their “liberator” as a “homely” man who did not hold himself apart; Southerners felt a nostalgia for Abraham Lincoln as a humble “conciliator.” Later, educators glorified Lincoln as a symbol of nationhood to help assimilate poor immigrants. Monument makers focused not only on a gigantic body but also on a nationalist “union,” downplaying “emancipation.” Among both black and white liberals in the 1960s and 1970s, Lincoln was derided or fell out of fashion. Recently, Lincoln has been embodied once again (as idealist and pragmatist) by outstanding historians, by self-identified Lincolnian president Barack Obama, and by actor Daniel Day-Lewis—all keeping Lincoln alive in a body of memory that speaks volumes about our nation.
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Description:

Nineteenth-century African Americans felt deep affection for their “liberator” as a “homely” man who did not hold himself apart; Southerners felt a nostalgia for Abraham Lincoln as a humble “conciliator.” Later, educators glorified Lincoln as a symbol of nationhood to help assimilate poor immigrants. Monument makers focused not only on a gigantic body but also on a nationalist “union,” downplaying “emancipation.” Among both black and white liberals in the 1960s and 1970s, Lincoln was derided or fell out of fashion. Recently, Lincoln has been embodied once again (as idealist and pragmatist) by outstanding historians, by self-identified Lincolnian president Barack Obama, and by actor Daniel Day-Lewis—all keeping Lincoln alive in a body of memory that speaks volumes about our nation.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Pete Larkin

Length:

12h 42m


Chapters

Free Sample

05:00

Introduction
Introduction

14:42


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

47:50


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

51:47


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

33:43


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

31:14


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

51:27


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

32:45


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

28:29


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

48:11


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

42:48


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

45:15


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

32:16


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

29:33


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

57:45


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

43:00


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

55:02


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

48:42


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

35:13


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

32:40