Lost Discoveries - The Ancient Roots of Modern Science from the Babylonians to the Mayans-logo

Lost Discoveries - The Ancient Roots of Modern Science from the Babylonians to the Mayans

Dick Teresi

Lost Discoveries, Dick Teresi's innovative history of science, explores the unheralded scientific breakthroughs from peoples of the ancient world -- Babylonians, Egyptians, Indians, Africans, New World and Oceanic tribes, among others -- and the non-European medieval world. They left an enormous heritage in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, cosmology, physics, geology, chemistry, and technology. The mathematical foundation of Western science is a gift from the Indians, Chinese, Arabs, Babylonians, and Maya. The ancient Egyptians developed the concept of the lowest common denominator, and they developed a fraction table that modern scholars estimate required 28,000 calculations to compile. The Babylonians developed the first written math and used a place-value number system. Our numerals, 0 through 9, were invented in ancient India; the Indians also boasted geometry, trigonometry, and a kind of calculus. Planetary astronomy as well may have begun with the ancient Indians, who correctly identified the relative distances of the known planets from the sun, and knew the moon was nearer to the earth than the sun was. The Chinese observed, reported, dated, recorded, and interpreted eclipses between 1400 and 1200 b.c. Most of the names of our stars and constellations are Arabic. Arabs built the first observatories. Five thousand years ago, the Sumerians said the earth was circular. In the sixth century, a Hindu astronomer taught that the daily rotation of the earth on its axis provided the rising and setting of the sun. Chinese and Arab scholars were the first to use fossils scientifically to trace earth's history. Chinese alchemists realized that most physical substances were merely combinations of other substances, which could be mixed in different proportions. Islamic scholars are legendary for translating scientific texts of many languages into Arabic, a tradition that began with alchemical books. In the eleventh century, Avicenna of Persia divined that outward qualities of metals were of little value in clas

Lost Discoveries, Dick Teresi's innovative history of science, explores the unheralded scientific breakthroughs from peoples of the ancient world -- Babylonians, Egyptians, Indians, Africans, New World and Oceanic tribes, among others -- and the non-European medieval world. They left an enormous heritage in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, cosmology, physics, geology, chemistry, and technology. The mathematical foundation of Western science is a gift from the Indians, Chinese, Arabs, Babylonians, and Maya. The ancient Egyptians developed the concept of the lowest common denominator, and they developed a fraction table that modern scholars estimate required 28,000 calculations to compile. The Babylonians developed the first written math and used a place-value number system. Our numerals, 0 through 9, were invented in ancient India; the Indians also boasted geometry, trigonometry, and a kind of calculus. Planetary astronomy as well may have begun with the ancient Indians, who correctly identified the relative distances of the known planets from the sun, and knew the moon was nearer to the earth than the sun was. The Chinese observed, reported, dated, recorded, and interpreted eclipses between 1400 and 1200 b.c. Most of the names of our stars and constellations are Arabic. Arabs built the first observatories. Five thousand years ago, the Sumerians said the earth was circular. In the sixth century, a Hindu astronomer taught that the daily rotation of the earth on its axis provided the rising and setting of the sun. Chinese and Arab scholars were the first to use fossils scientifically to trace earth's history. Chinese alchemists realized that most physical substances were merely combinations of other substances, which could be mixed in different proportions. Islamic scholars are legendary for translating scientific texts of many languages into Arabic, a tradition that began with alchemical books. In the eleventh century, Avicenna of Persia divined that outward qualities of metals were of little value in clas
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Lost Discoveries, Dick Teresi's innovative history of science, explores the unheralded scientific breakthroughs from peoples of the ancient world -- Babylonians, Egyptians, Indians, Africans, New World and Oceanic tribes, among others -- and the non-European medieval world. They left an enormous heritage in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, cosmology, physics, geology, chemistry, and technology. The mathematical foundation of Western science is a gift from the Indians, Chinese, Arabs, Babylonians, and Maya. The ancient Egyptians developed the concept of the lowest common denominator, and they developed a fraction table that modern scholars estimate required 28,000 calculations to compile. The Babylonians developed the first written math and used a place-value number system. Our numerals, 0 through 9, were invented in ancient India; the Indians also boasted geometry, trigonometry, and a kind of calculus. Planetary astronomy as well may have begun with the ancient Indians, who correctly identified the relative distances of the known planets from the sun, and knew the moon was nearer to the earth than the sun was. The Chinese observed, reported, dated, recorded, and interpreted eclipses between 1400 and 1200 b.c. Most of the names of our stars and constellations are Arabic. Arabs built the first observatories. Five thousand years ago, the Sumerians said the earth was circular. In the sixth century, a Hindu astronomer taught that the daily rotation of the earth on its axis provided the rising and setting of the sun. Chinese and Arab scholars were the first to use fossils scientifically to trace earth's history. Chinese alchemists realized that most physical substances were merely combinations of other substances, which could be mixed in different proportions. Islamic scholars are legendary for translating scientific texts of many languages into Arabic, a tradition that began with alchemical books. In the eleventh century, Avicenna of Persia divined that outward qualities of metals were of little value in clas

Language:

English

Narrators:

Peter Johnson

Length:

14h 39m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

02:08


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

46:43


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

37:00


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

15:20


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

29:57


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

14:27


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:35


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

13:19


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:56


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

21:15


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

09:32


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

45:44


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

08:34


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

21:43


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

14:56


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

18:48


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

24:50


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

26:31


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

32:23


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

08:35


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

11:07


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

10:49


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

24:27


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

18:43


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

23:58


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

21:08


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

08:43


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

22:18


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

03:04


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:16


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

11:14


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

20:31


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

25:44


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

01:40


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

07:28


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

17:35


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

08:45


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

08:23


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

03:10


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

21:30


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

14:36


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

13:51


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

09:30


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

13:16


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

03:39


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

08:50


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

16:22


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

06:53


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

04:27


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

23:26


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

28:24


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

09:59


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

10:47


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

31:27


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

01:05