Mirror to America - The Autobiography of John Hope Franklin-logo

Mirror to America - The Autobiography of John Hope Franklin

John Hope Franklin

Ninety years of American history as lived by the nation's preeminent African American historian and winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. John Hope Franklin lived through America's most defining twentieth-century transformation, the dismantling of legally-protected racial segregation. A renowned scholar, he has explored that transformation in its myriad aspects, notably in his 3.5 million-copy bestseller, From Slavery to Freedom. And he was, and remains, an active participant. Born in 1915, he, like every other African American, could not but participate: he was evicted from whites-only train cars, confined to segregated schools, threatened-once with lynching-and consistently met with racism's denigration of his humanity. And yet he managed to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard, become the first black historian to assume a full-professorship at a white institution, Brooklyn College, be appointed chair of the University of Chicago's history department, and, later, John B. Duke Professor at Duke University. He has reshaped the way African American history is understood and taught and become one of the world's most celebrated historians, garnering over 130 honorary degrees. But Franklin's participation was much more fundamental than that. From his effort in 1934 to hand President Franklin Roosevelt a petition calling for action in response to the Cordie Cheek lynching, to his 1997 appointment by President Clinton to head the President's Initiative on Race, and continuing to the present, Franklin has influenced with determination and dignity the nation's racial conscience. Whether aiding Thurgood Marshall's preparation for arguing Brown v. Board in 1954, marching to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965, or testifying against Robert Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court in 1987, Franklin has pushed the national conversation on race towards humanity and equality, a life-long effort that earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in 1995. Intimate, at times revelatory, Mirror to Ame

Ninety years of American history as lived by the nation's preeminent African American historian and winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. John Hope Franklin lived through America's most defining twentieth-century transformation, the dismantling of legally-protected racial segregation. A renowned scholar, he has explored that transformation in its myriad aspects, notably in his 3.5 million-copy bestseller, From Slavery to Freedom. And he was, and remains, an active participant. Born in 1915, he, like every other African American, could not but participate: he was evicted from whites-only train cars, confined to segregated schools, threatened-once with lynching-and consistently met with racism's denigration of his humanity. And yet he managed to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard, become the first black historian to assume a full-professorship at a white institution, Brooklyn College, be appointed chair of the University of Chicago's history department, and, later, John B. Duke Professor at Duke University. He has reshaped the way African American history is understood and taught and become one of the world's most celebrated historians, garnering over 130 honorary degrees. But Franklin's participation was much more fundamental than that. From his effort in 1934 to hand President Franklin Roosevelt a petition calling for action in response to the Cordie Cheek lynching, to his 1997 appointment by President Clinton to head the President's Initiative on Race, and continuing to the present, Franklin has influenced with determination and dignity the nation's racial conscience. Whether aiding Thurgood Marshall's preparation for arguing Brown v. Board in 1954, marching to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965, or testifying against Robert Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court in 1987, Franklin has pushed the national conversation on race towards humanity and equality, a life-long effort that earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in 1995. Intimate, at times revelatory, Mirror to Ame
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Ninety years of American history as lived by the nation's preeminent African American historian and winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. John Hope Franklin lived through America's most defining twentieth-century transformation, the dismantling of legally-protected racial segregation. A renowned scholar, he has explored that transformation in its myriad aspects, notably in his 3.5 million-copy bestseller, From Slavery to Freedom. And he was, and remains, an active participant. Born in 1915, he, like every other African American, could not but participate: he was evicted from whites-only train cars, confined to segregated schools, threatened-once with lynching-and consistently met with racism's denigration of his humanity. And yet he managed to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard, become the first black historian to assume a full-professorship at a white institution, Brooklyn College, be appointed chair of the University of Chicago's history department, and, later, John B. Duke Professor at Duke University. He has reshaped the way African American history is understood and taught and become one of the world's most celebrated historians, garnering over 130 honorary degrees. But Franklin's participation was much more fundamental than that. From his effort in 1934 to hand President Franklin Roosevelt a petition calling for action in response to the Cordie Cheek lynching, to his 1997 appointment by President Clinton to head the President's Initiative on Race, and continuing to the present, Franklin has influenced with determination and dignity the nation's racial conscience. Whether aiding Thurgood Marshall's preparation for arguing Brown v. Board in 1954, marching to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965, or testifying against Robert Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court in 1987, Franklin has pushed the national conversation on race towards humanity and equality, a life-long effort that earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in 1995. Intimate, at times revelatory, Mirror to Ame

Language:

English

Length:

7h 1m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

08:15


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

06:08


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

07:27


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

06:38


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

07:08


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:16


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

06:22


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:16


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

08:40


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

07:08


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

06:14


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

06:03


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:17


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:45


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

08:02


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

09:17


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

08:20


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

08:26


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

08:34


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

04:28


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

08:42


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

07:42


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

07:58


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

06:41


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

07:06


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

06:18


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

07:38


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

09:27


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

09:29


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

05:35


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

07:33


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

06:36


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

08:34


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

07:03


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

06:49


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

08:58


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

07:14


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

07:45


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

03:49


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:12


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

06:49


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

08:50


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

06:10


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

07:16


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

05:24


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

05:57


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

05:34


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

06:06


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

05:39


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

06:29


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

06:01


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

04:18


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

07:38


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

05:45


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

04:19


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

06:57


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

07:02


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

07:34


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

05:57


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

06:24


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

03:40


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

03:07