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Miss Mackenzie

Anthony Trollope

The thirty-five year-old (hence utterly over-the-hill) Miss Margaret Mackenzie, having devoted her life to others, suddenly finds herself with no one to care for, and in possession of a moderate fortune. Having money, she is now much sought-after and no longer universally deemed too old to marry. Partly because she has spent her life taking care of the brother whose money she has now inherited, she has no experience of wealth or popularity. Miss Mackenzie is the definition of “other-oriented. (Indeed, Trollope originally considered naming the novel, and his heroine, “Griselda”, presumably to invoke the folkloric character’s qualities of stolid obedience and endless patience.) These circumstances are the perfect set-up for classic Trollopian swipes and snipes at various fortune-hunters and other obsequies, and more broadly at society’s sexism, classism, and Mammonism. She comes into her own and begins to try to enjoy life, at first juggling, but ultimately rejecting, three serious suitors. As the story unfolds, the particulars of her deceased brother’s life and death reveal themselves, Miss Mackenzie becomes increasingly able to know who she is and what she wants, and both she and the reader are better able to discern the true colors of those around her. The question is: Will her self-knowledge overcome both her personal history and various social prejudices, so as to allow her to fall in love with – and say “yes” to – a really good man? (Summary by Kirsten Wever)

The thirty-five year-old (hence utterly over-the-hill) Miss Margaret Mackenzie, having devoted her life to others, suddenly finds herself with no one to care for, and in possession of a moderate fortune. Having money, she is now much sought-after and no longer universally deemed too old to marry. Partly because she has spent her life taking care of the brother whose money she has now inherited, she has no experience of wealth or popularity. Miss Mackenzie is the definition of “other-oriented. (Indeed, Trollope originally considered naming the novel, and his heroine, “Griselda”, presumably to invoke the folkloric character’s qualities of stolid obedience and endless patience.) These circumstances are the perfect set-up for classic Trollopian swipes and snipes at various fortune-hunters and other obsequies, and more broadly at society’s sexism, classism, and Mammonism. She comes into her own and begins to try to enjoy life, at first juggling, but ultimately rejecting, three serious suitors. As the story unfolds, the particulars of her deceased brother’s life and death reveal themselves, Miss Mackenzie becomes increasingly able to know who she is and what she wants, and both she and the reader are better able to discern the true colors of those around her. The question is: Will her self-knowledge overcome both her personal history and various social prejudices, so as to allow her to fall in love with – and say “yes” to – a really good man? (Summary by Kirsten Wever)
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Description:

The thirty-five year-old (hence utterly over-the-hill) Miss Margaret Mackenzie, having devoted her life to others, suddenly finds herself with no one to care for, and in possession of a moderate fortune. Having money, she is now much sought-after and no longer universally deemed too old to marry. Partly because she has spent her life taking care of the brother whose money she has now inherited, she has no experience of wealth or popularity. Miss Mackenzie is the definition of “other-oriented. (Indeed, Trollope originally considered naming the novel, and his heroine, “Griselda”, presumably to invoke the folkloric character’s qualities of stolid obedience and endless patience.) These circumstances are the perfect set-up for classic Trollopian swipes and snipes at various fortune-hunters and other obsequies, and more broadly at society’s sexism, classism, and Mammonism. She comes into her own and begins to try to enjoy life, at first juggling, but ultimately rejecting, three serious suitors. As the story unfolds, the particulars of her deceased brother’s life and death reveal themselves, Miss Mackenzie becomes increasingly able to know who she is and what she wants, and both she and the reader are better able to discern the true colors of those around her. The question is: Will her self-knowledge overcome both her personal history and various social prejudices, so as to allow her to fall in love with – and say “yes” to – a really good man? (Summary by Kirsten Wever)

Language:

English

Narrators:

LibriVox Community

Length:

14h 39m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

33:11


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

30:16


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

29:26


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

31:33


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

28:14


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

28:50


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

29:29


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

31:28


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

29:57


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

30:55


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

31:17


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

26:46


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

33:52


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

27:32


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

28:37


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

22:38


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

34:32


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

31:01


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

38:11


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

33:12


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

37:47


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

30:26


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

31:30


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

00:01


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

29:05


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

28:59


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

37:11


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

28:58


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

29:28


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

14:48