Paul Newman - A Life-logo

Paul Newman - A Life

Shawn Levy

Paul Newman, the Oscar-winning actor with the legendary blue eyes, achieved superstar status by playing charismatic renegades, broken heroes, and winsome antiheroes in such revered films as The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Verdict, The Color of Money, and Nobody's Fool. But Newman was also an oddity in Hollywood: the rare box-office titan who cared about the craft of acting, the sexy leading man known for the staying power of his marriage, and the humble celebrity who made philanthropy his calling card long before it was cool. The son of a successful entrepreneur, Newman grew up in a prosperous Cleveland suburb. Despite fears that he would fail to live up to his father's expectations, Newman bypassed the family sporting goods business to pursue an acting career. After struggling as a theater and television actor, Newman saw his star rise in a tragic twist of fate, landing the role of boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me when James Dean was killed in a car accident. Though he would joke about instances of "Newman's luck" throughout his career, he refused to coast on his stunning boyish looks and impish charm. Part of the original Actors Studio generation, Newman demanded a high level of rigor and clarity from every project. The artistic battles that nearly derailed his early movie career would pay off handsomely at the box office and earn him critical acclaim. He applied that tenacity to every endeavor both on and off the set. The outspoken Newman used his celebrity to call attention to political causes dear to his heart, including civil rights and nuclear proliferation. Taking up auto racing in midlife, Newman became the oldest driver to ever win a major professional auto race. A food enthusiast who would dress his own salads in restaurants, he launched the Newman's Own brand dedicated to fresh ingredients, a nonprofit juggernaut that has generated more than $250 million for charity. In Paul Newman: A Life, film critic and pop culture historian Shawn Levy gives

Paul Newman, the Oscar-winning actor with the legendary blue eyes, achieved superstar status by playing charismatic renegades, broken heroes, and winsome antiheroes in such revered films as The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Verdict, The Color of Money, and Nobody's Fool. But Newman was also an oddity in Hollywood: the rare box-office titan who cared about the craft of acting, the sexy leading man known for the staying power of his marriage, and the humble celebrity who made philanthropy his calling card long before it was cool. The son of a successful entrepreneur, Newman grew up in a prosperous Cleveland suburb. Despite fears that he would fail to live up to his father's expectations, Newman bypassed the family sporting goods business to pursue an acting career. After struggling as a theater and television actor, Newman saw his star rise in a tragic twist of fate, landing the role of boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me when James Dean was killed in a car accident. Though he would joke about instances of "Newman's luck" throughout his career, he refused to coast on his stunning boyish looks and impish charm. Part of the original Actors Studio generation, Newman demanded a high level of rigor and clarity from every project. The artistic battles that nearly derailed his early movie career would pay off handsomely at the box office and earn him critical acclaim. He applied that tenacity to every endeavor both on and off the set. The outspoken Newman used his celebrity to call attention to political causes dear to his heart, including civil rights and nuclear proliferation. Taking up auto racing in midlife, Newman became the oldest driver to ever win a major professional auto race. A food enthusiast who would dress his own salads in restaurants, he launched the Newman's Own brand dedicated to fresh ingredients, a nonprofit juggernaut that has generated more than $250 million for charity. In Paul Newman: A Life, film critic and pop culture historian Shawn Levy gives
More Information

Description:

Paul Newman, the Oscar-winning actor with the legendary blue eyes, achieved superstar status by playing charismatic renegades, broken heroes, and winsome antiheroes in such revered films as The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Verdict, The Color of Money, and Nobody's Fool. But Newman was also an oddity in Hollywood: the rare box-office titan who cared about the craft of acting, the sexy leading man known for the staying power of his marriage, and the humble celebrity who made philanthropy his calling card long before it was cool. The son of a successful entrepreneur, Newman grew up in a prosperous Cleveland suburb. Despite fears that he would fail to live up to his father's expectations, Newman bypassed the family sporting goods business to pursue an acting career. After struggling as a theater and television actor, Newman saw his star rise in a tragic twist of fate, landing the role of boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me when James Dean was killed in a car accident. Though he would joke about instances of "Newman's luck" throughout his career, he refused to coast on his stunning boyish looks and impish charm. Part of the original Actors Studio generation, Newman demanded a high level of rigor and clarity from every project. The artistic battles that nearly derailed his early movie career would pay off handsomely at the box office and earn him critical acclaim. He applied that tenacity to every endeavor both on and off the set. The outspoken Newman used his celebrity to call attention to political causes dear to his heart, including civil rights and nuclear proliferation. Taking up auto racing in midlife, Newman became the oldest driver to ever win a major professional auto race. A food enthusiast who would dress his own salads in restaurants, he launched the Newman's Own brand dedicated to fresh ingredients, a nonprofit juggernaut that has generated more than $250 million for charity. In Paul Newman: A Life, film critic and pop culture historian Shawn Levy gives

Language:

English

Narrators:

Marc Cashman

Length:

5h 59m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:12


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

06:13


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

06:43


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

07:44


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

07:44


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

07:38


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:34


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

06:27


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

06:49


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

06:09


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

06:11


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

06:22


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

06:24


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:26


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:24


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

07:25


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

06:59


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

07:30


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

07:56


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:18


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

07:14


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

07:44


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

07:12


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

06:51


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

07:28


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

07:31


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

06:06


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

07:20


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

06:53


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:09


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

07:44


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

07:27


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

07:42


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

06:15


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

07:30


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

06:46


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

06:46


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

07:00


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:46


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

06:09


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

06:21


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

06:00


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

06:13


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

06:56


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

07:35


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

07:04


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

07:22


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

06:29


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

06:46


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

06:15


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

06:07


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

06:21


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

06:07


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

00:29