Ted Williams - The Biography of an American Hero-logo

Ted Williams - The Biography of an American Hero

Leigh Montville

He was The Kid. The Splendid Splinter. Teddy Ballgame. One of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend - and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? What motivated him to interrupt his Hall of Fame career twice to serve his country as a fighter pilot; to embrace his fans while tangling with the media; to retreat from the limelight whenever possible into his solitary love of fishing; and to become the most famous man ever to have his body cryogenically frozen after his death? New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville, who wrote the celebrated Sports Illustrated obituary of Ted Williams, now delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life. Still a gangly teenager when he stepped into a Boston Red Sox uniform in 1939, Williams's boisterous personality and penchant for towering home runs earned him adoring admirers--the fans--and venomous critics--the sportswriters. In 1941, the entire country followed Williams's stunning .406 season, a record that has not been touched in over six decades. At the pinnacle of his prime, Williams left Boston to train and serve as a fighter pilot in World War II, missing three full years of baseball. He was back in 1946, dominating the sport alongside teammates Dominic DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, and Bobby Doerr. But Williams left baseball again in 1952 to fight in Korea, where he flew thirty-nine combat missions-crash-landing his flaming, smoke-filled plane, in one famous episode. Ted Willams's personal life was equally colorful. His attraction to women (and their attraction to him) was a constant. He was married and divorced three times and he fathered two daughters and a son. He was one of corporate America's first modern spokesmen, and he remained, nearly into his eighties, a fiercely devoted fisherman. With his son, John Henry Williams, he devoted his final years to the sports memorabilia business, even as illness overtook him. And in death, controversy an

He was The Kid. The Splendid Splinter. Teddy Ballgame. One of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend - and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? What motivated him to interrupt his Hall of Fame career twice to serve his country as a fighter pilot; to embrace his fans while tangling with the media; to retreat from the limelight whenever possible into his solitary love of fishing; and to become the most famous man ever to have his body cryogenically frozen after his death? New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville, who wrote the celebrated Sports Illustrated obituary of Ted Williams, now delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life. Still a gangly teenager when he stepped into a Boston Red Sox uniform in 1939, Williams's boisterous personality and penchant for towering home runs earned him adoring admirers--the fans--and venomous critics--the sportswriters. In 1941, the entire country followed Williams's stunning .406 season, a record that has not been touched in over six decades. At the pinnacle of his prime, Williams left Boston to train and serve as a fighter pilot in World War II, missing three full years of baseball. He was back in 1946, dominating the sport alongside teammates Dominic DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, and Bobby Doerr. But Williams left baseball again in 1952 to fight in Korea, where he flew thirty-nine combat missions-crash-landing his flaming, smoke-filled plane, in one famous episode. Ted Willams's personal life was equally colorful. His attraction to women (and their attraction to him) was a constant. He was married and divorced three times and he fathered two daughters and a son. He was one of corporate America's first modern spokesmen, and he remained, nearly into his eighties, a fiercely devoted fisherman. With his son, John Henry Williams, he devoted his final years to the sports memorabilia business, even as illness overtook him. And in death, controversy an
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He was The Kid. The Splendid Splinter. Teddy Ballgame. One of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend - and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? What motivated him to interrupt his Hall of Fame career twice to serve his country as a fighter pilot; to embrace his fans while tangling with the media; to retreat from the limelight whenever possible into his solitary love of fishing; and to become the most famous man ever to have his body cryogenically frozen after his death? New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville, who wrote the celebrated Sports Illustrated obituary of Ted Williams, now delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life. Still a gangly teenager when he stepped into a Boston Red Sox uniform in 1939, Williams's boisterous personality and penchant for towering home runs earned him adoring admirers--the fans--and venomous critics--the sportswriters. In 1941, the entire country followed Williams's stunning .406 season, a record that has not been touched in over six decades. At the pinnacle of his prime, Williams left Boston to train and serve as a fighter pilot in World War II, missing three full years of baseball. He was back in 1946, dominating the sport alongside teammates Dominic DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, and Bobby Doerr. But Williams left baseball again in 1952 to fight in Korea, where he flew thirty-nine combat missions-crash-landing his flaming, smoke-filled plane, in one famous episode. Ted Willams's personal life was equally colorful. His attraction to women (and their attraction to him) was a constant. He was married and divorced three times and he fathered two daughters and a son. He was one of corporate America's first modern spokesmen, and he remained, nearly into his eighties, a fiercely devoted fisherman. With his son, John Henry Williams, he devoted his final years to the sports memorabilia business, even as illness overtook him. And in death, controversy an

Language:

English

Narrators:

Philip Bosco

Length:

5h 59m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

06:09


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

05:41


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

07:28


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

06:36


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

08:05


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

06:20


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

06:39


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

07:34


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

08:15


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

04:59


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

05:16


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

07:07


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

08:10


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

07:29


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

06:41


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

07:48


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

08:56


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

08:13


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:57


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

08:37


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

06:35


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

08:11


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

07:45


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

07:10


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

07:01


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

08:15


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

07:26


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

08:21


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:33


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

07:15


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

08:23


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

08:03


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

07:39


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

07:39


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

06:18


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

05:49


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

05:41


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

05:37


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

06:56


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

06:23


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

04:38


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

05:07


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

05:35


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

04:17


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

06:32


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

04:33


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

05:46


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

07:52


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

05:34


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

04:31


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

04:21


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

07:34


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

05:36