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The Greater Journey - Americans in Paris

David McCullough

Now in paperback, the New York Times bestseller from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough-the inspiring, enthralling story of the American painters, writers, sculptors, and doctors who journeyed to Paris between 1830 and 1900. A Special Audio Presentation of Unabridged Selections Personally Chosen by David McCullough The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring-and until now, untold-story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work. Most had never left home, never experienced a different culture. None had any guarantee of success. That they achieved so much for themselves and their country profoundly altered American history. As David McCullough writes, "Not all pioneers went west." Writer Emma Willard, who founded the first women's college in America, was one of the intrepid bunch. Another was Charles Sumner, who enrolled at the Sorbonne where he saw black students with the same ambition he had, and when he returned home, he would become the most powerful, unyielding voice for abolition in the U.S. Senate. James Fenimore Cooper and Samuel F. B. Morse worked unrelentingly every day in Paris, Cooper writing and Morse painting what would be his masterpiece. From something he saw in France, Morse would also bring home his momentous idea for the telegraph. Writers Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, and Henry James were all "discovering" Paris, marveling at the treasures in the Louvre, or out with the Sunday throngs strolling the city's boulevards and gardens. "At last I have come into a dreamland," wrote Harriet Beecher Stowe, seeking escape from the notoriety Uncle Tom's Cabin had brought her. The genius of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and painter George Healy would flourish in Paris, inspired by the examples of brillant French masters, and by Paris itself. For this special audio presentation, McCullough has

Now in paperback, the New York Times bestseller from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough-the inspiring, enthralling story of the American painters, writers, sculptors, and doctors who journeyed to Paris between 1830 and 1900. A Special Audio Presentation of Unabridged Selections Personally Chosen by David McCullough The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring-and until now, untold-story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work. Most had never left home, never experienced a different culture. None had any guarantee of success. That they achieved so much for themselves and their country profoundly altered American history. As David McCullough writes, "Not all pioneers went west." Writer Emma Willard, who founded the first women's college in America, was one of the intrepid bunch. Another was Charles Sumner, who enrolled at the Sorbonne where he saw black students with the same ambition he had, and when he returned home, he would become the most powerful, unyielding voice for abolition in the U.S. Senate. James Fenimore Cooper and Samuel F. B. Morse worked unrelentingly every day in Paris, Cooper writing and Morse painting what would be his masterpiece. From something he saw in France, Morse would also bring home his momentous idea for the telegraph. Writers Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, and Henry James were all "discovering" Paris, marveling at the treasures in the Louvre, or out with the Sunday throngs strolling the city's boulevards and gardens. "At last I have come into a dreamland," wrote Harriet Beecher Stowe, seeking escape from the notoriety Uncle Tom's Cabin had brought her. The genius of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and painter George Healy would flourish in Paris, inspired by the examples of brillant French masters, and by Paris itself. For this special audio presentation, McCullough has
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Genres:

History

Description:

Now in paperback, the New York Times bestseller from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough-the inspiring, enthralling story of the American painters, writers, sculptors, and doctors who journeyed to Paris between 1830 and 1900. A Special Audio Presentation of Unabridged Selections Personally Chosen by David McCullough The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring-and until now, untold-story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work. Most had never left home, never experienced a different culture. None had any guarantee of success. That they achieved so much for themselves and their country profoundly altered American history. As David McCullough writes, "Not all pioneers went west." Writer Emma Willard, who founded the first women's college in America, was one of the intrepid bunch. Another was Charles Sumner, who enrolled at the Sorbonne where he saw black students with the same ambition he had, and when he returned home, he would become the most powerful, unyielding voice for abolition in the U.S. Senate. James Fenimore Cooper and Samuel F. B. Morse worked unrelentingly every day in Paris, Cooper writing and Morse painting what would be his masterpiece. From something he saw in France, Morse would also bring home his momentous idea for the telegraph. Writers Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, and Henry James were all "discovering" Paris, marveling at the treasures in the Louvre, or out with the Sunday throngs strolling the city's boulevards and gardens. "At last I have come into a dreamland," wrote Harriet Beecher Stowe, seeking escape from the notoriety Uncle Tom's Cabin had brought her. The genius of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and painter George Healy would flourish in Paris, inspired by the examples of brillant French masters, and by Paris itself. For this special audio presentation, McCullough has

Language:

English

Narrators:

Edward Herrmann

Length:

16h 51m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:45


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

29:33


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

23:35


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

01:05


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

13:02


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

15:27


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

24:31


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

28:25


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

17:08


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

30:00


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

25:12


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

21:53


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

18:38


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

29:42


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

14:06


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

17:32


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

20:58


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

15:12


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

26:03


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

26:45


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

28:29


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

19:07


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

10:11


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

13:09


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

25:45


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

17:26


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

16:36


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

24:46


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

21:45


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

15:54


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

28:36


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

11:19


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

21:56


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

16:48


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

19:24


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

16:58


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

23:38


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

19:53


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

23:31


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

16:46


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

19:04


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

24:40


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

20:05


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

26:19


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

29:26


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

24:09


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

28:04


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

18:41


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

18:35


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

09:02


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

01:30