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The Hit

Melvin Burgess

Live the ultimate high. Pay the ultimate price. The shocking return to YA by the author of SMACK. A new drug is on the street. Everyone's buzzing about it. Take the hit. Live the most intense week of your life. Then die. It's the ultimate high at the ultimate price. Adam thinks it over. He's poor, and doesn't see that changing. Lizzie, his girlfriend, can't make up her mind about sleeping with him, so he can't get laid. His brother Jess is missing. And Manchester is in chaos, controlled by drug dealers and besieged by a group of homegrown terrorists who call themselves the Zealots. Wouldn't one amazing week be better than this endless, penniless misery? After Adam downs one of the Death pills, he's about to find out. Review Quotes: "Booklist "Starred Review Burgess' dystopian novel posits a near-future world in which the gap between rich and poor has grown to an unbridgeable chasm. In their despair, many have-nots are taking a new drug called Death that offers seven days of euphoric bliss followed by the oblivion of death. Adam, 17, is one of these. His hopes for an education are dashed, his brother is missing and presumed dead, and he's been dumped by his girlfriend, Lizzie. Seeing nothing but a bleak future, he impulsively takes the pill, but as his own options are precluded, enormous changes are underway. Led by a group called the Zealots, society is teetering on the brink of revolution. Meanwhile, a drug lord and his psychopathic son enter Adam and Lizzie's lives to potentially catastrophic effect. Will Lizzie survive? Will Adam die or is it possible that there might be an antidote to Death after all? Burgess, a master of YA literature, has written a novel of white-knuckle suspense that has considerable violence and ambitious philosophical underpinnings. How does one deal with socioeconomic inequity? Is revolution a viable strategy? Is death? If this ambitious novel has flaws, it may be a lack of attention to these very questions. In addition, the villains--though terrifying--are over the top. But all

Live the ultimate high. Pay the ultimate price. The shocking return to YA by the author of SMACK. A new drug is on the street. Everyone's buzzing about it. Take the hit. Live the most intense week of your life. Then die. It's the ultimate high at the ultimate price. Adam thinks it over. He's poor, and doesn't see that changing. Lizzie, his girlfriend, can't make up her mind about sleeping with him, so he can't get laid. His brother Jess is missing. And Manchester is in chaos, controlled by drug dealers and besieged by a group of homegrown terrorists who call themselves the Zealots. Wouldn't one amazing week be better than this endless, penniless misery? After Adam downs one of the Death pills, he's about to find out. Review Quotes: "Booklist "Starred Review Burgess' dystopian novel posits a near-future world in which the gap between rich and poor has grown to an unbridgeable chasm. In their despair, many have-nots are taking a new drug called Death that offers seven days of euphoric bliss followed by the oblivion of death. Adam, 17, is one of these. His hopes for an education are dashed, his brother is missing and presumed dead, and he's been dumped by his girlfriend, Lizzie. Seeing nothing but a bleak future, he impulsively takes the pill, but as his own options are precluded, enormous changes are underway. Led by a group called the Zealots, society is teetering on the brink of revolution. Meanwhile, a drug lord and his psychopathic son enter Adam and Lizzie's lives to potentially catastrophic effect. Will Lizzie survive? Will Adam die or is it possible that there might be an antidote to Death after all? Burgess, a master of YA literature, has written a novel of white-knuckle suspense that has considerable violence and ambitious philosophical underpinnings. How does one deal with socioeconomic inequity? Is revolution a viable strategy? Is death? If this ambitious novel has flaws, it may be a lack of attention to these very questions. In addition, the villains--though terrifying--are over the top. But all
More Information

Description:

Live the ultimate high. Pay the ultimate price. The shocking return to YA by the author of SMACK. A new drug is on the street. Everyone's buzzing about it. Take the hit. Live the most intense week of your life. Then die. It's the ultimate high at the ultimate price. Adam thinks it over. He's poor, and doesn't see that changing. Lizzie, his girlfriend, can't make up her mind about sleeping with him, so he can't get laid. His brother Jess is missing. And Manchester is in chaos, controlled by drug dealers and besieged by a group of homegrown terrorists who call themselves the Zealots. Wouldn't one amazing week be better than this endless, penniless misery? After Adam downs one of the Death pills, he's about to find out. Review Quotes: "Booklist "Starred Review Burgess' dystopian novel posits a near-future world in which the gap between rich and poor has grown to an unbridgeable chasm. In their despair, many have-nots are taking a new drug called Death that offers seven days of euphoric bliss followed by the oblivion of death. Adam, 17, is one of these. His hopes for an education are dashed, his brother is missing and presumed dead, and he's been dumped by his girlfriend, Lizzie. Seeing nothing but a bleak future, he impulsively takes the pill, but as his own options are precluded, enormous changes are underway. Led by a group called the Zealots, society is teetering on the brink of revolution. Meanwhile, a drug lord and his psychopathic son enter Adam and Lizzie's lives to potentially catastrophic effect. Will Lizzie survive? Will Adam die or is it possible that there might be an antidote to Death after all? Burgess, a master of YA literature, has written a novel of white-knuckle suspense that has considerable violence and ambitious philosophical underpinnings. How does one deal with socioeconomic inequity? Is revolution a viable strategy? Is death? If this ambitious novel has flaws, it may be a lack of attention to these very questions. In addition, the villains--though terrifying--are over the top. But all

Language:

English

Narrators:

Samuel Roukin

Length:

7h 52m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:13


Part 1, Chapter 1
Part 1, Chapter 1

16:14


Part 1, Chapter 2
Part 1, Chapter 2

17:59


Part 1, Chapter 3
Part 1, Chapter 3

20:56


Part 1, Chapter 4
Part 1, Chapter 4

15:33


Part 1, Chapter 5
Part 1, Chapter 5

08:54


Part 1, Chapter 6
Part 1, Chapter 6

23:54


Part 1, Chapter 7
Part 1, Chapter 7

14:01


Part 1, Chapter 8
Part 1, Chapter 8

12:11


Part 2, Chapter 9
Part 2, Chapter 9

30:26


Part 2, Chapter 10
Part 2, Chapter 10

22:33


Part 2, Chapter 11
Part 2, Chapter 11

23:18


Part 2, Chapter 12
Part 2, Chapter 12

22:59


Part 2, Chapter 13
Part 2, Chapter 13

08:57


Part 2, Chapter 14
Part 2, Chapter 14

08:33


Part 2, Chapter 15
Part 2, Chapter 15

25:58


Part 2, Chapter 16
Part 2, Chapter 16

21:31


Part 2, Chapter 17
Part 2, Chapter 17

32:15


Part 2, Chapter 18
Part 2, Chapter 18

15:21


Part 3, Chapter 19
Part 3, Chapter 19

40:17


Part 3, Chapter 20
Part 3, Chapter 20

07:26


Part 3, Chapter 21
Part 3, Chapter 21

16:39


Part 3, Chapter 22
Part 3, Chapter 22

16:31


Part 3, Chapter 23
Part 3, Chapter 23

11:43


Part 3, Chapter 24
Part 3, Chapter 24

12:50


Part 3, Chapter 25
Part 3, Chapter 25

24:18


Part 3, Chapter 26
Part 3, Chapter 26

01:08