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The Lieutenant Takes the Sky-logo

The Lieutenant Takes the Sky

L. Ron Hubbard

American pilot Mike Malloy has learned his lesson: when you join the French Foreign Legion, it’s best not to wipe the floor with two French officers . . . no matter how richly they deserve it. And it appears he has all the time in the world to think about it. He’s been sentenced to five years in a Moroccan penal battalion-which is French for death sentence. But Malloy, who could easily pass for actor Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., is about to get a reprieve . . . if he’s willing to fly into the heart of the Sahara and into the teeth of a Berber rebellion. It’s an offer Malloy can’t refuse. All he has to do is fly two passengers into the desert and return with a book that disappeared 800 years ago. But as he’s a man who doesn’t go by the book, this expedition could turn out to have unexpected benefits. One of his passengers is a young American woman whose eyes are as beautiful and blue as the wild blue yonder. . . . Hubbard once said that writers too often “forget a great deal of the languorous quality which made the Arabian Nights so pleasing. Jewels, beautiful women, towering cities filled with mysterious shadows, sultans equally handy with robes of honor and the beheading sword . . . these things still exist, undimmed, losing no luster to the permeating Occidental flavor which reaches even the far corners of the earth today.” Hubbard brings this unique insight to his stories of North Africa and the Legionnaires, investing them with an authenticity of time, place and character that kept his readers asking for more.

American pilot Mike Malloy has learned his lesson: when you join the French Foreign Legion, it’s best not to wipe the floor with two French officers . . . no matter how richly they deserve it. And it appears he has all the time in the world to think about it. He’s been sentenced to five years in a Moroccan penal battalion-which is French for death sentence. But Malloy, who could easily pass for actor Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., is about to get a reprieve . . . if he’s willing to fly into the heart of the Sahara and into the teeth of a Berber rebellion. It’s an offer Malloy can’t refuse. All he has to do is fly two passengers into the desert and return with a book that disappeared 800 years ago. But as he’s a man who doesn’t go by the book, this expedition could turn out to have unexpected benefits. One of his passengers is a young American woman whose eyes are as beautiful and blue as the wild blue yonder. . . . Hubbard once said that writers too often “forget a great deal of the languorous quality which made the Arabian Nights so pleasing. Jewels, beautiful women, towering cities filled with mysterious shadows, sultans equally handy with robes of honor and the beheading sword . . . these things still exist, undimmed, losing no luster to the permeating Occidental flavor which reaches even the far corners of the earth today.” Hubbard brings this unique insight to his stories of North Africa and the Legionnaires, investing them with an authenticity of time, place and character that kept his readers asking for more.
More Information

Description:

American pilot Mike Malloy has learned his lesson: when you join the French Foreign Legion, it’s best not to wipe the floor with two French officers . . . no matter how richly they deserve it. And it appears he has all the time in the world to think about it. He’s been sentenced to five years in a Moroccan penal battalion-which is French for death sentence. But Malloy, who could easily pass for actor Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., is about to get a reprieve . . . if he’s willing to fly into the heart of the Sahara and into the teeth of a Berber rebellion. It’s an offer Malloy can’t refuse. All he has to do is fly two passengers into the desert and return with a book that disappeared 800 years ago. But as he’s a man who doesn’t go by the book, this expedition could turn out to have unexpected benefits. One of his passengers is a young American woman whose eyes are as beautiful and blue as the wild blue yonder. . . . Hubbard once said that writers too often “forget a great deal of the languorous quality which made the Arabian Nights so pleasing. Jewels, beautiful women, towering cities filled with mysterious shadows, sultans equally handy with robes of honor and the beheading sword . . . these things still exist, undimmed, losing no luster to the permeating Occidental flavor which reaches even the far corners of the earth today.” Hubbard brings this unique insight to his stories of North Africa and the Legionnaires, investing them with an authenticity of time, place and character that kept his readers asking for more.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Richard Rocco, R.F. Daley

Length:

1h 49m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:30


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

03:55


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

04:14


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

05:35


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:45


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

04:39


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

05:11


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:45


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

06:20


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

04:40


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

05:28


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

07:25


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

00:18


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

05:52


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

07:03


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

06:20


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

06:28


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

08:45


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

04:50


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

04:17


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

03:26


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

01:58


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

00:23