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The Long Goodbye-logo

The Long Goodbye

Patti Davis

Ronald Reagan's daughter writes with a moving openness about losing her father to Alzheimer's disease. The simplicity with which she reveals the intensity, the rush, the flow of her feelings encompasses all the surprises and complexities that ambush us when death gradually, unstoppably invades life. In The Long Goodbye, Patti Davis describes losing her father to Alzheimer's disease, saying goodbye in stages, helpless against the onslaught of a disease that steals what is most precious-a person's memory. "Alzheimer's," she writes, "snips away at the threads, a slow unraveling, a steady retreat; as a witness all you can do is watch, cry, and whisper a soft stream of goodbyes." She writes of needing to be reunited at forty-two with her mother ("she had wept as much as I over our long, embittered war"), of regaining what they had spent decades demolishing; a truce was necessary to bring together a splintered family, a few weeks before her father released his letter telling the country and the world of his illness . . . The author delves into her memories to touch her father again, to hear his voice, to keep alive the years she had with him. She writes as if past and present were coming together, of her memories as a child, holding her father's hand, and as a young woman whose hand is being given away in marriage by her father . . . of her father teaching her to ride a bicycle, of the moment when he let her go and she went off on her own . . . of his teaching her the difference between a hawk and a buzzard . . . of the family summer vacations at a rented beach house-each of them tan, her father looking like the athlete he was, with a swimmer's broad shoulders and lean torso. . . . She writes of how her father never resisted solitude, in fact was born for it, of that strange reserve that made people reach for him. . . . She recalls him sitting at his desk, writing, staring out the window . . . and she writes about the toll of the disease itself, the look in her father's eyes, and her efforts to reel him back to her

Ronald Reagan's daughter writes with a moving openness about losing her father to Alzheimer's disease. The simplicity with which she reveals the intensity, the rush, the flow of her feelings encompasses all the surprises and complexities that ambush us when death gradually, unstoppably invades life. In The Long Goodbye, Patti Davis describes losing her father to Alzheimer's disease, saying goodbye in stages, helpless against the onslaught of a disease that steals what is most precious-a person's memory. "Alzheimer's," she writes, "snips away at the threads, a slow unraveling, a steady retreat; as a witness all you can do is watch, cry, and whisper a soft stream of goodbyes." She writes of needing to be reunited at forty-two with her mother ("she had wept as much as I over our long, embittered war"), of regaining what they had spent decades demolishing; a truce was necessary to bring together a splintered family, a few weeks before her father released his letter telling the country and the world of his illness . . . The author delves into her memories to touch her father again, to hear his voice, to keep alive the years she had with him. She writes as if past and present were coming together, of her memories as a child, holding her father's hand, and as a young woman whose hand is being given away in marriage by her father . . . of her father teaching her to ride a bicycle, of the moment when he let her go and she went off on her own . . . of his teaching her the difference between a hawk and a buzzard . . . of the family summer vacations at a rented beach house-each of them tan, her father looking like the athlete he was, with a swimmer's broad shoulders and lean torso. . . . She writes of how her father never resisted solitude, in fact was born for it, of that strange reserve that made people reach for him. . . . She recalls him sitting at his desk, writing, staring out the window . . . and she writes about the toll of the disease itself, the look in her father's eyes, and her efforts to reel him back to her
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Description:

Ronald Reagan's daughter writes with a moving openness about losing her father to Alzheimer's disease. The simplicity with which she reveals the intensity, the rush, the flow of her feelings encompasses all the surprises and complexities that ambush us when death gradually, unstoppably invades life. In The Long Goodbye, Patti Davis describes losing her father to Alzheimer's disease, saying goodbye in stages, helpless against the onslaught of a disease that steals what is most precious-a person's memory. "Alzheimer's," she writes, "snips away at the threads, a slow unraveling, a steady retreat; as a witness all you can do is watch, cry, and whisper a soft stream of goodbyes." She writes of needing to be reunited at forty-two with her mother ("she had wept as much as I over our long, embittered war"), of regaining what they had spent decades demolishing; a truce was necessary to bring together a splintered family, a few weeks before her father released his letter telling the country and the world of his illness . . . The author delves into her memories to touch her father again, to hear his voice, to keep alive the years she had with him. She writes as if past and present were coming together, of her memories as a child, holding her father's hand, and as a young woman whose hand is being given away in marriage by her father . . . of her father teaching her to ride a bicycle, of the moment when he let her go and she went off on her own . . . of his teaching her the difference between a hawk and a buzzard . . . of the family summer vacations at a rented beach house-each of them tan, her father looking like the athlete he was, with a swimmer's broad shoulders and lean torso. . . . She writes of how her father never resisted solitude, in fact was born for it, of that strange reserve that made people reach for him. . . . She recalls him sitting at his desk, writing, staring out the window . . . and she writes about the toll of the disease itself, the look in her father's eyes, and her efforts to reel him back to her

Language:

English

Narrators:

Staci Snell

Length:

5h 36m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:13


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

04:11


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

02:55


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:30


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

03:05


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

04:21


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

03:27


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

01:37


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

03:14


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

01:26


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

03:45


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

03:48


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

02:36


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

03:36


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

01:33


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

03:45


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

02:43


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

03:40


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

03:29


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

02:23


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

03:22


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

03:04


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

03:42


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

01:34


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

03:35


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

03:51


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

02:27


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

03:50


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

03:36


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

03:25


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

03:58


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:45


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

03:33


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

03:30


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

03:44


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

03:58


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

03:54


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

03:51


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

02:42


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

02:09


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

03:24


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

01:07


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

03:42


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

03:28


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

02:09


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

03:33


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

02:43


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

02:04


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

03:03


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

04:01


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

03:18


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

03:28


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

02:05


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

03:22


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

03:23


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

03:47


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

03:15


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

02:17


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

03:34


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

02:58


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

03:25


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

01:04


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

03:56


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

03:31


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

03:33


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

03:32


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

01:26


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

03:08


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

03:51


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

03:44


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

03:22


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

03:32


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

03:21


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

03:31


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

03:35


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

02:54


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

02:44


Chapter 78
Chapter 78

03:35


Chapter 79
Chapter 79

03:39


Chapter 80
Chapter 80

03:10


Chapter 81
Chapter 81

02:03


Chapter 82
Chapter 82

03:29


Chapter 83
Chapter 83

02:51


Chapter 84
Chapter 84

03:29


Chapter 85
Chapter 85

03:23


Chapter 86
Chapter 86

03:21


Chapter 87
Chapter 87

03:18


Chapter 88
Chapter 88

03:51


Chapter 89
Chapter 89

01:31


Chapter 90
Chapter 90

03:24


Chapter 91
Chapter 91

02:42


Chapter 92
Chapter 92

03:59


Chapter 93
Chapter 93

03:41


Chapter 94
Chapter 94

02:40


Chapter 95
Chapter 95

01:41


Chapter 96
Chapter 96

03:12


Chapter 97
Chapter 97

02:42


Chapter 98
Chapter 98

01:54


Chapter 99
Chapter 99

03:08


Chapter 100
Chapter 100

04:06


Chapter 101
Chapter 101

03:39


Chapter 102
Chapter 102

02:06


Chapter 103
Chapter 103

03:55


Chapter 104
Chapter 104

03:29


Chapter 105
Chapter 105

03:44


Chapter 106
Chapter 106

02:29


Chapter 107
Chapter 107

03:55


Chapter 108
Chapter 108

00:36