The Meaning of Human Existence-logo

The Meaning of Human Existence

Edward O. Wilson

Searching for meaning in what Nietzsche once called “the rainbow colors” around the outer edges of knowledge and imagination, Edward O. Wilson bridges science and philosophy to create a twenty-first-century treatise on human existence. Once criticized for his over-reliance on genetics, Wilson unfurls here his most expansive and advanced theories on human behavior, recognizing that, even though the human and spider evolved similarly, the poet’s sonnet is wholly different than the spider’s web. Whether attempting to explicate “the Riddle of the Human Species,” warning of “the Collapse of Biodiversity,” or even creating a plausible “Portrait of E.T.,” Wilson does indeed believe that humanity holds a special position in the known universe. Alarmed, however, that we are about to abandon natural selection by redesigning biology and human nature as we wish them, Wilson concludes that advances in science and technology bring us our greatest moral dilemma since God stayed the hand of Abraham.

Searching for meaning in what Nietzsche once called “the rainbow colors” around the outer edges of knowledge and imagination, Edward O. Wilson bridges science and philosophy to create a twenty-first-century treatise on human existence. Once criticized for his over-reliance on genetics, Wilson unfurls here his most expansive and advanced theories on human behavior, recognizing that, even though the human and spider evolved similarly, the poet’s sonnet is wholly different than the spider’s web. Whether attempting to explicate “the Riddle of the Human Species,” warning of “the Collapse of Biodiversity,” or even creating a plausible “Portrait of E.T.,” Wilson does indeed believe that humanity holds a special position in the known universe. Alarmed, however, that we are about to abandon natural selection by redesigning biology and human nature as we wish them, Wilson concludes that advances in science and technology bring us our greatest moral dilemma since God stayed the hand of Abraham.
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Description:

Searching for meaning in what Nietzsche once called “the rainbow colors” around the outer edges of knowledge and imagination, Edward O. Wilson bridges science and philosophy to create a twenty-first-century treatise on human existence. Once criticized for his over-reliance on genetics, Wilson unfurls here his most expansive and advanced theories on human behavior, recognizing that, even though the human and spider evolved similarly, the poet’s sonnet is wholly different than the spider’s web. Whether attempting to explicate “the Riddle of the Human Species,” warning of “the Collapse of Biodiversity,” or even creating a plausible “Portrait of E.T.,” Wilson does indeed believe that humanity holds a special position in the known universe. Alarmed, however, that we are about to abandon natural selection by redesigning biology and human nature as we wish them, Wilson concludes that advances in science and technology bring us our greatest moral dilemma since God stayed the hand of Abraham.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Jonathan Hogan

Length:

5h 6m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:13


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

04:25


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

04:59


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

17:11


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

12:16


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

27:32


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

13:13


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

26:10


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

22:08


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

16:10


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

14:29


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

21:16


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

16:04


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

19:26


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

19:54


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

20:09


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

25:39


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

25:44