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The Potlikker Papers - A Food History of the Modern South-logo

The Potlikker Papers - A Food History of the Modern South

John T. Edge

A people's history of Southern food that reveals how the region came to be at the forefront of American culinary culture and how issues of race have shaped Southern cuisine over the last six decades THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tells the story of food and politics in the South over the last half century. Beginning with the pivotal role of cooks in the Civil Rights movement, noted authority John T. Edge narrates the South's journey from racist backwater to a hotbed of American immigration. In so doing, he traces how the food of the poorest Southerners has become the signature trend of modern American haute cuisine. This is a people's history of the modern South told through the lens of food. Food was a battleground in the Civil Rights movement. Access to food and ownership of culinary tradition was a central part of the long march to racial equality. THE POTLIKKER PAPERS begins in 1955 as black cooks and maids fed and supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott and it concludes in 2015 as a Newer South came to be, enriched by the arrival of immigrants from Lebanon to Vietnam to all points in between. Along the way, THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tracks many different evolutions of Southern identity --first in the 1970s, from the back-to-the-land movement that began in the Tennessee hills to the rise of fast and convenience foods modeled on Southern staples. Edge narrates the gentrification that gained traction in North Carolina and Louisiana restaurants of the 1980s and the artisanal renaissance that reconnected farmers and cooks in the 1990s and in the 00s. He profiles some of the most extraordinary and fascinating figures in Southern food, including Fannie Lou Hamer, Colonel Sanders, Edna Lewis, Paul Prudhomme, Craig Claiborne, Sean Brock, and many others. Like many great provincial dishes around the world, potlikker is a salvage food. During the antebellum era, masters ate the greens from the pot and set aside the left-over potlikker broth for their slaves, unaware that the broth, not the greens, was nutrient-rich. After slavery, p

A people's history of Southern food that reveals how the region came to be at the forefront of American culinary culture and how issues of race have shaped Southern cuisine over the last six decades THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tells the story of food and politics in the South over the last half century. Beginning with the pivotal role of cooks in the Civil Rights movement, noted authority John T. Edge narrates the South's journey from racist backwater to a hotbed of American immigration. In so doing, he traces how the food of the poorest Southerners has become the signature trend of modern American haute cuisine. This is a people's history of the modern South told through the lens of food. Food was a battleground in the Civil Rights movement. Access to food and ownership of culinary tradition was a central part of the long march to racial equality. THE POTLIKKER PAPERS begins in 1955 as black cooks and maids fed and supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott and it concludes in 2015 as a Newer South came to be, enriched by the arrival of immigrants from Lebanon to Vietnam to all points in between. Along the way, THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tracks many different evolutions of Southern identity --first in the 1970s, from the back-to-the-land movement that began in the Tennessee hills to the rise of fast and convenience foods modeled on Southern staples. Edge narrates the gentrification that gained traction in North Carolina and Louisiana restaurants of the 1980s and the artisanal renaissance that reconnected farmers and cooks in the 1990s and in the 00s. He profiles some of the most extraordinary and fascinating figures in Southern food, including Fannie Lou Hamer, Colonel Sanders, Edna Lewis, Paul Prudhomme, Craig Claiborne, Sean Brock, and many others. Like many great provincial dishes around the world, potlikker is a salvage food. During the antebellum era, masters ate the greens from the pot and set aside the left-over potlikker broth for their slaves, unaware that the broth, not the greens, was nutrient-rich. After slavery, p
More Information

Description:

A people's history of Southern food that reveals how the region came to be at the forefront of American culinary culture and how issues of race have shaped Southern cuisine over the last six decades THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tells the story of food and politics in the South over the last half century. Beginning with the pivotal role of cooks in the Civil Rights movement, noted authority John T. Edge narrates the South's journey from racist backwater to a hotbed of American immigration. In so doing, he traces how the food of the poorest Southerners has become the signature trend of modern American haute cuisine. This is a people's history of the modern South told through the lens of food. Food was a battleground in the Civil Rights movement. Access to food and ownership of culinary tradition was a central part of the long march to racial equality. THE POTLIKKER PAPERS begins in 1955 as black cooks and maids fed and supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott and it concludes in 2015 as a Newer South came to be, enriched by the arrival of immigrants from Lebanon to Vietnam to all points in between. Along the way, THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tracks many different evolutions of Southern identity --first in the 1970s, from the back-to-the-land movement that began in the Tennessee hills to the rise of fast and convenience foods modeled on Southern staples. Edge narrates the gentrification that gained traction in North Carolina and Louisiana restaurants of the 1980s and the artisanal renaissance that reconnected farmers and cooks in the 1990s and in the 00s. He profiles some of the most extraordinary and fascinating figures in Southern food, including Fannie Lou Hamer, Colonel Sanders, Edna Lewis, Paul Prudhomme, Craig Claiborne, Sean Brock, and many others. Like many great provincial dishes around the world, potlikker is a salvage food. During the antebellum era, masters ate the greens from the pot and set aside the left-over potlikker broth for their slaves, unaware that the broth, not the greens, was nutrient-rich. After slavery, p

Language:

English

Length:

10h 9m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:31


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

00:07


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

00:40


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:15


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

06:25


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:25


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

08:32


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

05:03


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

05:21


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

03:53


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

05:53


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

04:49


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

05:05


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:58


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

03:52


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

08:19


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

06:20


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

08:30


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

06:59


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

08:17


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

05:05


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

06:22


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

05:48


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

05:39


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

05:19


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

07:08


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

06:37


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

04:41


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

06:14


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

03:47


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

05:57


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:12


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

06:22


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

05:07


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

04:42


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

07:57


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

05:21


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:05


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

08:52


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

03:44


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

07:53


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

07:49


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

07:47


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

05:46


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

06:55


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

05:06


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

05:19


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

06:16


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

06:18


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

04:34


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

04:43


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

06:15


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

06:03


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

03:57


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

05:59


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

06:02


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

06:52


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

08:20


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

04:31


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

05:56


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

07:15


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

06:30


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

06:25


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

03:46


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

05:12


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

07:08


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

03:11


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

07:01


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

04:51


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

05:24


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

05:55


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

06:24


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

07:48


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

04:29


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

05:35


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

06:05


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

07:30


Chapter 78
Chapter 78

03:45


Chapter 79
Chapter 79

05:48


Chapter 80
Chapter 80

05:20


Chapter 81
Chapter 81

05:18


Chapter 82
Chapter 82

05:05


Chapter 83
Chapter 83

05:53


Chapter 84
Chapter 84

04:23


Chapter 85
Chapter 85

08:26


Chapter 86
Chapter 86

08:19


Chapter 87
Chapter 87

04:47


Chapter 88
Chapter 88

06:51


Chapter 89
Chapter 89

06:05


Chapter 90
Chapter 90

08:06


Chapter 91
Chapter 91

05:08


Chapter 92
Chapter 92

06:01


Chapter 93
Chapter 93

05:12


Chapter 94
Chapter 94

06:26


Chapter 95
Chapter 95

04:05


Chapter 96
Chapter 96

07:47


Chapter 97
Chapter 97

05:29


Chapter 98
Chapter 98

08:01


Chapter 99
Chapter 99

08:04


Chapter 100
Chapter 100

07:55


Chapter 101
Chapter 101

07:20


Chapter 102
Chapter 102

07:49


Chapter 103
Chapter 103

08:12


Chapter 104
Chapter 104

00:58