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The Suicide Run - Five Tales of the Marine Corps-logo

The Suicide Run - Five Tales of the Marine Corps

William Styron

Before writing his memoir of madness, Darkness Visible, William Styron was best known for his ambitious works of fiction-including The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie's Choice. Styron also created personal but no less powerful tales based on his real-life experiences as a U.S. Marine. The Suicide Run collects five of these meticulously rendered narratives. One of them-"Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco"-is published here for the first time. In "Blankenship," written in 1953, Styron draws on his stint as a guard at a stateside military prison at the end of World War II. "Marriott, the Marine" and "The Suicide Run"-which Styron composed in the early 1970s as part of an intended novel that he set aside to write Sophie's Choice-depict the surreal experience of being conscripted a second time, after World War II, to serve in the Korean War. "My Father's House" captures the isolation and frustration of a soldier trying to become a civilian again. In "Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco," written late in Styron's life, a soldier attempts to exorcise the dread of an approaching battle by daydreaming about far-off islands, visited vicariously through his childhood stamp collection. Perhaps the last volume from one of literature's greatest voices, The Suicide Run brings to life the drama, inhumanity, absurdity, and heroism that forever changed the men who served in the Marine Corps. From the Hardcover edition.

Before writing his memoir of madness, Darkness Visible, William Styron was best known for his ambitious works of fiction-including The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie's Choice. Styron also created personal but no less powerful tales based on his real-life experiences as a U.S. Marine. The Suicide Run collects five of these meticulously rendered narratives. One of them-"Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco"-is published here for the first time. In "Blankenship," written in 1953, Styron draws on his stint as a guard at a stateside military prison at the end of World War II. "Marriott, the Marine" and "The Suicide Run"-which Styron composed in the early 1970s as part of an intended novel that he set aside to write Sophie's Choice-depict the surreal experience of being conscripted a second time, after World War II, to serve in the Korean War. "My Father's House" captures the isolation and frustration of a soldier trying to become a civilian again. In "Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco," written late in Styron's life, a soldier attempts to exorcise the dread of an approaching battle by daydreaming about far-off islands, visited vicariously through his childhood stamp collection. Perhaps the last volume from one of literature's greatest voices, The Suicide Run brings to life the drama, inhumanity, absurdity, and heroism that forever changed the men who served in the Marine Corps. From the Hardcover edition.
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Description:

Before writing his memoir of madness, Darkness Visible, William Styron was best known for his ambitious works of fiction-including The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie's Choice. Styron also created personal but no less powerful tales based on his real-life experiences as a U.S. Marine. The Suicide Run collects five of these meticulously rendered narratives. One of them-"Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco"-is published here for the first time. In "Blankenship," written in 1953, Styron draws on his stint as a guard at a stateside military prison at the end of World War II. "Marriott, the Marine" and "The Suicide Run"-which Styron composed in the early 1970s as part of an intended novel that he set aside to write Sophie's Choice-depict the surreal experience of being conscripted a second time, after World War II, to serve in the Korean War. "My Father's House" captures the isolation and frustration of a soldier trying to become a civilian again. In "Elobey, Annobón, and Corisco," written late in Styron's life, a soldier attempts to exorcise the dread of an approaching battle by daydreaming about far-off islands, visited vicariously through his childhood stamp collection. Perhaps the last volume from one of literature's greatest voices, The Suicide Run brings to life the drama, inhumanity, absurdity, and heroism that forever changed the men who served in the Marine Corps. From the Hardcover edition.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Mark Deakins

Length:

5h 30m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

00:15


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

07:53


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

07:08


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

07:29


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

07:24


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

07:39


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:38


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

07:16


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

07:19


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

05:39


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

07:16


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

06:49


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

07:12


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

08:01


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

08:16


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

07:44


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

07:45


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

07:12


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

07:29


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

07:22


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

07:44


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

08:01


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

07:44


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

07:25


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

06:56


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

04:47


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

06:50


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

05:37


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

07:40


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:32


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

07:52


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

07:27


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

07:33


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

07:41


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

07:22


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

06:34


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

05:17


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

07:17


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

07:56


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

07:38


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

08:07


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

07:29


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

08:28


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

07:54


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

07:49


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

06:12


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

00:28