The Third Reconstruction - How a Moral Movement Is Overcoming the Politics of Division and Fear-logo

The Third Reconstruction - How a Moral Movement Is Overcoming the Politics of Division and Fear

The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II

A modern-day civil rights champion tells the stirring story of how he helped start a movement to bridge America's racial divide. Over the summer of 2013, the Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II led more than a hundred thousand people at rallies across North Carolina to protest restrictions to voting access and an extreme makeover of state government. These protests-the largest state government-focused civil disobedience campaign in American history-came to be known as Moral Mondays and have since blossomed in states as diverse as Florida, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Ohio, and New York. At a time when divide-and-conquer politics are exacerbating racial strife and economic inequality, Rev. Barber offers an impassioned, historically grounded argument that Moral Mondays are hard evidence of an embryonic Third Reconstruction in America. The first Reconstruction briefly flourished after Emancipation, and the second Reconstruction ushered in meaningful progress in the civil rights era. But both were met by ferocious reactionary measures that severely curtailed, and in many cases rolled back, racial and economic progress. This Third Reconstruction is a profoundly moral awakening of justice-loving people united in a fusion coalition powerful enough to reclaim the possibility of democracy-even in the face of corporate-financed extremism. In this memoir of how Rev. Barber and allies as diverse as progressive Christians, union members, and immigration-rights activists came together to build a coalition, he offers a trenchant analysis of race-based inequality and a hopeful message for a nation grappling with persistent racial and economic injustice. Rev. Barber writes movingly-and pragmatically-about how he laid the groundwork for a state-by-state movement that unites black, white, and brown, rich and poor, employed and unemployed, gay and straight, documented and undocumented, religious and secular. Only such a diverse fusion movement, Rev. Barber argues, can heal our nation's wounds and produce public policy that is morally def

A modern-day civil rights champion tells the stirring story of how he helped start a movement to bridge America's racial divide. Over the summer of 2013, the Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II led more than a hundred thousand people at rallies across North Carolina to protest restrictions to voting access and an extreme makeover of state government. These protests-the largest state government-focused civil disobedience campaign in American history-came to be known as Moral Mondays and have since blossomed in states as diverse as Florida, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Ohio, and New York. At a time when divide-and-conquer politics are exacerbating racial strife and economic inequality, Rev. Barber offers an impassioned, historically grounded argument that Moral Mondays are hard evidence of an embryonic Third Reconstruction in America. The first Reconstruction briefly flourished after Emancipation, and the second Reconstruction ushered in meaningful progress in the civil rights era. But both were met by ferocious reactionary measures that severely curtailed, and in many cases rolled back, racial and economic progress. This Third Reconstruction is a profoundly moral awakening of justice-loving people united in a fusion coalition powerful enough to reclaim the possibility of democracy-even in the face of corporate-financed extremism. In this memoir of how Rev. Barber and allies as diverse as progressive Christians, union members, and immigration-rights activists came together to build a coalition, he offers a trenchant analysis of race-based inequality and a hopeful message for a nation grappling with persistent racial and economic injustice. Rev. Barber writes movingly-and pragmatically-about how he laid the groundwork for a state-by-state movement that unites black, white, and brown, rich and poor, employed and unemployed, gay and straight, documented and undocumented, religious and secular. Only such a diverse fusion movement, Rev. Barber argues, can heal our nation's wounds and produce public policy that is morally def
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Description:

A modern-day civil rights champion tells the stirring story of how he helped start a movement to bridge America's racial divide. Over the summer of 2013, the Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II led more than a hundred thousand people at rallies across North Carolina to protest restrictions to voting access and an extreme makeover of state government. These protests-the largest state government-focused civil disobedience campaign in American history-came to be known as Moral Mondays and have since blossomed in states as diverse as Florida, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Ohio, and New York. At a time when divide-and-conquer politics are exacerbating racial strife and economic inequality, Rev. Barber offers an impassioned, historically grounded argument that Moral Mondays are hard evidence of an embryonic Third Reconstruction in America. The first Reconstruction briefly flourished after Emancipation, and the second Reconstruction ushered in meaningful progress in the civil rights era. But both were met by ferocious reactionary measures that severely curtailed, and in many cases rolled back, racial and economic progress. This Third Reconstruction is a profoundly moral awakening of justice-loving people united in a fusion coalition powerful enough to reclaim the possibility of democracy-even in the face of corporate-financed extremism. In this memoir of how Rev. Barber and allies as diverse as progressive Christians, union members, and immigration-rights activists came together to build a coalition, he offers a trenchant analysis of race-based inequality and a hopeful message for a nation grappling with persistent racial and economic injustice. Rev. Barber writes movingly-and pragmatically-about how he laid the groundwork for a state-by-state movement that unites black, white, and brown, rich and poor, employed and unemployed, gay and straight, documented and undocumented, religious and secular. Only such a diverse fusion movement, Rev. Barber argues, can heal our nation's wounds and produce public policy that is morally def

Language:

English

Narrators:

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Chase Bradley

Length:

5h 11m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:23


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

08:36


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

06:48


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

08:10


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

09:39


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

07:17


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

01:54


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

09:17


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

08:10


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

09:15


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

01:25


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

08:57


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

08:53


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

05:42


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

03:01


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

08:57


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

09:04


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

08:42


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

02:34


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

06:31


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

09:15


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

09:15


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

09:11


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

02:42


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

06:42


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

09:22


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

09:01


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

09:56


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:50


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

08:33


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

08:31


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:24


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

05:46


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

09:04


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

08:57


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

05:10


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

06:31


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

09:15


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

09:01


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

09:19


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

02:39


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

08:00


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

04:31


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

06:31