Try Premium for 30 days

Live games for all NFL, MLB, NBA, & NHL teams
Commercial-Free Music
No Display Ads
The Underground Railroad, Part 3-logo

The Underground Railroad, Part 3

William Still

Never before has the working of the Underground Railroad been so thoroughly explained. Here we have in complete detail the various methods adopted for circumventing the enemies of freedom, and told, as it is, with great simplicity and natural feeling, the narrative is one which cannot but make a deep impression. Thrilling incidents, heroic adventures and noble deeds of self-sacrifice light up every page, and will enlist the heartiest sympathies of all generous souls. It was eminently just that such a record of one of the most remarkable phases of the struggle against slavery should be prepared, that the memory of the noble originators and supporters of the railroad might be kept green, and posterity enabled to form a true conception of the necessity that called it into existence, and of the difficulties under which its work was performed. The labor of compiling could not have fallen into more appropriate or better qualified hands. The Philadelphia Inquirer William Still is often called the Father of the Underground Railroad. Over 14 years, he helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom in Canada. Still was committed to preserving the stories of the bondmen and he kept careful records of the many escaped slaves who passed through the Philadelphia “station”. The Underground Railroad was published in 1871 from Still’s records and diaries. In bringing you these stories, Librivox volunteers are reading from the 1878 edition. (Summary by MaryAnn) Complete list of recordings comprising this book:The Underground Railroad, Part 1, The Underground Railroad, Part 2, The Underground Railroad, Part 3, The Underground Railroad, Part 4, The Underground Railroad, Part 5.

Never before has the working of the Underground Railroad been so thoroughly explained. Here we have in complete detail the various methods adopted for circumventing the enemies of freedom, and told, as it is, with great simplicity and natural feeling, the narrative is one which cannot but make a deep impression. Thrilling incidents, heroic adventures and noble deeds of self-sacrifice light up every page, and will enlist the heartiest sympathies of all generous souls. It was eminently just that such a record of one of the most remarkable phases of the struggle against slavery should be prepared, that the memory of the noble originators and supporters of the railroad might be kept green, and posterity enabled to form a true conception of the necessity that called it into existence, and of the difficulties under which its work was performed. The labor of compiling could not have fallen into more appropriate or better qualified hands. The Philadelphia Inquirer William Still is often called the Father of the Underground Railroad. Over 14 years, he helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom in Canada. Still was committed to preserving the stories of the bondmen and he kept careful records of the many escaped slaves who passed through the Philadelphia “station”. The Underground Railroad was published in 1871 from Still’s records and diaries. In bringing you these stories, Librivox volunteers are reading from the 1878 edition. (Summary by MaryAnn) Complete list of recordings comprising this book:The Underground Railroad, Part 1, The Underground Railroad, Part 2, The Underground Railroad, Part 3, The Underground Railroad, Part 4, The Underground Railroad, Part 5.
More Information

Description:

Never before has the working of the Underground Railroad been so thoroughly explained. Here we have in complete detail the various methods adopted for circumventing the enemies of freedom, and told, as it is, with great simplicity and natural feeling, the narrative is one which cannot but make a deep impression. Thrilling incidents, heroic adventures and noble deeds of self-sacrifice light up every page, and will enlist the heartiest sympathies of all generous souls. It was eminently just that such a record of one of the most remarkable phases of the struggle against slavery should be prepared, that the memory of the noble originators and supporters of the railroad might be kept green, and posterity enabled to form a true conception of the necessity that called it into existence, and of the difficulties under which its work was performed. The labor of compiling could not have fallen into more appropriate or better qualified hands. The Philadelphia Inquirer William Still is often called the Father of the Underground Railroad. Over 14 years, he helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom in Canada. Still was committed to preserving the stories of the bondmen and he kept careful records of the many escaped slaves who passed through the Philadelphia “station”. The Underground Railroad was published in 1871 from Still’s records and diaries. In bringing you these stories, Librivox volunteers are reading from the 1878 edition. (Summary by MaryAnn) Complete list of recordings comprising this book:The Underground Railroad, Part 1, The Underground Railroad, Part 2, The Underground Railroad, Part 3, The Underground Railroad, Part 4, The Underground Railroad, Part 5.

Language:

English

Narrators:

LibriVox Community

Length:

8h 20m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

15:59


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

13:31


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

16:31


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

17:41


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

04:32


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

16:59


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

14:33


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

14:42


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

16:52


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

13:23


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

00:01


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

18:05


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

22:18


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

26:05


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

21:23


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

16:23


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

13:47


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

15:26


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

15:48


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

16:43


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

12:24


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

09:12


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

14:08


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

12:31


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

15:42


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

14:49


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

17:53


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

16:12


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

07:59


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

09:50


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

12:02


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

10:48


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

10:06


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

12:31


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

13:59