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Three Years In Europe-logo

Three Years In Europe

William Wells Brown

William Wells Brown was born a slave, near Lexington, Kentucky. His mother, Elizabeth, was a slave--his father a white man who never acknowledged his paternity. Brown escaped slavery at about the age of 20. For many years he worked as a steamboatman and as a conductor for the Underground Railroad in Buffalo, New York. In 1843, he became a lecturer for the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, and was a contemporary of Frederick Douglass. Brown went to Europe in 1849 to encourage British support for the anti-slavery movement in the United States. He remained there until 1854 when British abolitionists purchased his freedom. Soon afterward, he returned to the United States to continue his work in the abolitionist movement. Throughout his life, he wrote several books, including his autobiography, Clotel, and, The Rising Son; or, The Antecedents and Advancement of the Colored Race, among others. He was also the author of two plays. Three Years In Europe; Or, Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met is a series of letters that Brown wrote to certain of his friends. A few were destined for publication in The Liberator, the famed abolitionist journal published by Frederick Douglass. In the letters, Brown described his impressions while traveling across Europe, meeting and sharing his experiences first as a slave and then as a fugitive. (Introduction by James K. White)

William Wells Brown was born a slave, near Lexington, Kentucky. His mother, Elizabeth, was a slave--his father a white man who never acknowledged his paternity. Brown escaped slavery at about the age of 20. For many years he worked as a steamboatman and as a conductor for the Underground Railroad in Buffalo, New York. In 1843, he became a lecturer for the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, and was a contemporary of Frederick Douglass. Brown went to Europe in 1849 to encourage British support for the anti-slavery movement in the United States. He remained there until 1854 when British abolitionists purchased his freedom. Soon afterward, he returned to the United States to continue his work in the abolitionist movement. Throughout his life, he wrote several books, including his autobiography, Clotel, and, The Rising Son; or, The Antecedents and Advancement of the Colored Race, among others. He was also the author of two plays. Three Years In Europe; Or, Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met is a series of letters that Brown wrote to certain of his friends. A few were destined for publication in The Liberator, the famed abolitionist journal published by Frederick Douglass. In the letters, Brown described his impressions while traveling across Europe, meeting and sharing his experiences first as a slave and then as a fugitive. (Introduction by James K. White)
More Information

Genres:

History

Description:

William Wells Brown was born a slave, near Lexington, Kentucky. His mother, Elizabeth, was a slave--his father a white man who never acknowledged his paternity. Brown escaped slavery at about the age of 20. For many years he worked as a steamboatman and as a conductor for the Underground Railroad in Buffalo, New York. In 1843, he became a lecturer for the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, and was a contemporary of Frederick Douglass. Brown went to Europe in 1849 to encourage British support for the anti-slavery movement in the United States. He remained there until 1854 when British abolitionists purchased his freedom. Soon afterward, he returned to the United States to continue his work in the abolitionist movement. Throughout his life, he wrote several books, including his autobiography, Clotel, and, The Rising Son; or, The Antecedents and Advancement of the Colored Race, among others. He was also the author of two plays. Three Years In Europe; Or, Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met is a series of letters that Brown wrote to certain of his friends. A few were destined for publication in The Liberator, the famed abolitionist journal published by Frederick Douglass. In the letters, Brown described his impressions while traveling across Europe, meeting and sharing his experiences first as a slave and then as a fugitive. (Introduction by James K. White)

Language:

English

Narrators:

LibriVox Community

Length:

7h 37m


Chapters

Introduction
Introduction

40:28


Chapter 1
Chapter 1

10:58


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

15:42


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

23:19


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

16:05


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

12:45


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

19:59


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

13:00


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

28:06


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

16:09


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

23:23


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

15:08


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

25:24


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

18:57


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

10:43


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

15:19


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

14:36


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

15:52


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

09:39


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

12:18


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

19:21


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

30:30


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

40:39


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

09:22