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Too Far From Home - A Story of Life and Death in Space-logo

Too Far From Home - A Story of Life and Death in Space

Chris Jones

An incredible, true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all-outer spaceIn the nearly forty years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has come to be seen as a routine enterprise-at least until the shuttle Columbia disintegrated like the Challenger before it, reminding us, once again, that the dangers are all too real. Too Far from Home vividly captures the hazardous realities of space travel. Every time an astronaut makes the trip into space, he faces the possibility of death from the slightest mechanical error or instance of bad luck: a cracked O-ring, an errant piece of space junk, an oxygen leak . . . There are a myriad of frighteningly probable events that would result in an astronaut's death. In fact, twenty-one people who have attempted the journey have been killed. Yet for a special breed of individual, the call of space is worth the risk. Men such as U.S. astronauts Donald Pettit and Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin, who in November 2002 left on what was to be a routine fourteen-week mission maintaining the International Space Station. But then, on February 23, 2003, the Columbia exploded beneath them. Despite the numerous news reports examining the tragedy, the public remained largely unaware that three men remained orbiting the earth. With the launch program suspended indefinitely, these astronauts had suddenly lost their ride home. Too Far from Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built Soyuz TMA-1 capsule, whose technology dated from the late 1960s (in 1971 a malfunction in the Soyuz 11 capsule left three Russian astronauts dead.) Despite the inherent danger, the Soyuz became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Pettit home. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty an

An incredible, true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all-outer spaceIn the nearly forty years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has come to be seen as a routine enterprise-at least until the shuttle Columbia disintegrated like the Challenger before it, reminding us, once again, that the dangers are all too real. Too Far from Home vividly captures the hazardous realities of space travel. Every time an astronaut makes the trip into space, he faces the possibility of death from the slightest mechanical error or instance of bad luck: a cracked O-ring, an errant piece of space junk, an oxygen leak . . . There are a myriad of frighteningly probable events that would result in an astronaut's death. In fact, twenty-one people who have attempted the journey have been killed. Yet for a special breed of individual, the call of space is worth the risk. Men such as U.S. astronauts Donald Pettit and Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin, who in November 2002 left on what was to be a routine fourteen-week mission maintaining the International Space Station. But then, on February 23, 2003, the Columbia exploded beneath them. Despite the numerous news reports examining the tragedy, the public remained largely unaware that three men remained orbiting the earth. With the launch program suspended indefinitely, these astronauts had suddenly lost their ride home. Too Far from Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built Soyuz TMA-1 capsule, whose technology dated from the late 1960s (in 1971 a malfunction in the Soyuz 11 capsule left three Russian astronauts dead.) Despite the inherent danger, the Soyuz became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Pettit home. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty an
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Description:

An incredible, true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all-outer spaceIn the nearly forty years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has come to be seen as a routine enterprise-at least until the shuttle Columbia disintegrated like the Challenger before it, reminding us, once again, that the dangers are all too real. Too Far from Home vividly captures the hazardous realities of space travel. Every time an astronaut makes the trip into space, he faces the possibility of death from the slightest mechanical error or instance of bad luck: a cracked O-ring, an errant piece of space junk, an oxygen leak . . . There are a myriad of frighteningly probable events that would result in an astronaut's death. In fact, twenty-one people who have attempted the journey have been killed. Yet for a special breed of individual, the call of space is worth the risk. Men such as U.S. astronauts Donald Pettit and Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin, who in November 2002 left on what was to be a routine fourteen-week mission maintaining the International Space Station. But then, on February 23, 2003, the Columbia exploded beneath them. Despite the numerous news reports examining the tragedy, the public remained largely unaware that three men remained orbiting the earth. With the launch program suspended indefinitely, these astronauts had suddenly lost their ride home. Too Far from Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built Soyuz TMA-1 capsule, whose technology dated from the late 1960s (in 1971 a malfunction in the Soyuz 11 capsule left three Russian astronauts dead.) Despite the inherent danger, the Soyuz became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Pettit home. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty an

Language:

English

Narrators:

Erik Davies

Length:

6h 12m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

04:23


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

03:30


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

03:48


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:46


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

03:45


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

03:37


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

05:05


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

04:11


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

04:27


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

04:58


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

05:17


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

05:26


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

04:16


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

01:38


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

04:43


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

04:59


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

03:42


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

03:35


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

03:43


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

04:11


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

02:28


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

03:21


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

03:51


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

02:33


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

04:35


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

02:09


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

03:43


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

03:38


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

05:12


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

04:11


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

04:30


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:32


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

05:21


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

03:16


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

04:21


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

04:46


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

02:10


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

04:01


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

04:10


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:17


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

04:21


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

03:44


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

04:33


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

04:33


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

04:51


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

05:00


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

04:38


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

05:07


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

03:01


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

03:01


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

04:51


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

05:02


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

03:34


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

03:17


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

04:01


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

02:31


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

04:51


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

04:35


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

04:49


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

04:00


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

02:56


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

03:25


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

03:05


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

01:43


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

03:15


Chapter 66
Chapter 66

02:49


Chapter 67
Chapter 67

04:54


Chapter 68
Chapter 68

03:51


Chapter 69
Chapter 69

03:34


Chapter 70
Chapter 70

03:21


Chapter 71
Chapter 71

03:42


Chapter 72
Chapter 72

03:51


Chapter 73
Chapter 73

03:41


Chapter 74
Chapter 74

02:52


Chapter 75
Chapter 75

04:42


Chapter 76
Chapter 76

03:06


Chapter 77
Chapter 77

03:56


Chapter 78
Chapter 78

03:31


Chapter 79
Chapter 79

02:51


Chapter 80
Chapter 80

04:12


Chapter 81
Chapter 81

01:05


Chapter 82
Chapter 82

04:53


Chapter 83
Chapter 83

03:53


Chapter 84
Chapter 84

05:23


Chapter 85
Chapter 85

04:47


Chapter 86
Chapter 86

03:07


Chapter 87
Chapter 87

02:36


Chapter 88
Chapter 88

04:32


Chapter 89
Chapter 89

04:29


Chapter 90
Chapter 90

03:59


Chapter 91
Chapter 91

02:46


Chapter 92
Chapter 92

03:19


Chapter 93
Chapter 93

02:32


Chapter 94
Chapter 94

03:54


Chapter 95
Chapter 95

03:52


Chapter 96
Chapter 96

03:13