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Turkish Tales - Poetry of Lord Byron

Lord Byron

We hope you will enjoy these fine, old-fashioned stories that Lord Byron wrote in an old-fashioned way. He tells these tales in rhyming verse and heroic couplets, and he makes them dashing, romantic, and even melodramatic in a way that has become foreign to us with the passing of time. These are tales of the Ottoman Empire, the Turkish empire that, in Lord Byron's day, encompassed what we now know as the Middle East from Iran to Morocco, the modern nation of Turkey, and the Balkans as well--modern Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania and the other Balkan nations. Byron traveled extensively in the Empire and learned about its history and customs. He then passed what he learned through his own romantic temperament and imagination, and through his fascination with men with darkly troubled souls and the women they love and who love them. In these five stories we find love and honor lost and won, hearts and cities conquered and broken, and a constant struggle to find something higher, deeper and finer in life than what comes to the common lot of humanity. The first story, The Giaour, is about a Christian knight living in Ottoman Greece. The word "giaour" was the Ottoman term for any Christian. He falls in love with a woman from the Pacha's harem--a love unlikely to succeed. The second story, The Bride of Abydos, is about the love of a man with a secret past for the daughter of a powerful local ruler. He reveals his secret to her, but only at the moment when war erupts between him and her father. The Corsair, the third story, picks up on an idea that appears in The Bride of Abydos--the theme of pirates and piracy, an age-old reality of the Mediterranean Sea. An Ottoman ruler decides to destroy a famous corsair, who strikes first. The corsair loses the battle, but gains the love of the ruler's daughter, who frees him--only to encounter a great tragedy. The fourth story, Lara, both is and is not a sequel to The Corsair. Characters and themes are carried over, but with many changes, and the feeling of the story is rema

We hope you will enjoy these fine, old-fashioned stories that Lord Byron wrote in an old-fashioned way. He tells these tales in rhyming verse and heroic couplets, and he makes them dashing, romantic, and even melodramatic in a way that has become foreign to us with the passing of time. These are tales of the Ottoman Empire, the Turkish empire that, in Lord Byron's day, encompassed what we now know as the Middle East from Iran to Morocco, the modern nation of Turkey, and the Balkans as well--modern Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania and the other Balkan nations. Byron traveled extensively in the Empire and learned about its history and customs. He then passed what he learned through his own romantic temperament and imagination, and through his fascination with men with darkly troubled souls and the women they love and who love them. In these five stories we find love and honor lost and won, hearts and cities conquered and broken, and a constant struggle to find something higher, deeper and finer in life than what comes to the common lot of humanity. The first story, The Giaour, is about a Christian knight living in Ottoman Greece. The word "giaour" was the Ottoman term for any Christian. He falls in love with a woman from the Pacha's harem--a love unlikely to succeed. The second story, The Bride of Abydos, is about the love of a man with a secret past for the daughter of a powerful local ruler. He reveals his secret to her, but only at the moment when war erupts between him and her father. The Corsair, the third story, picks up on an idea that appears in The Bride of Abydos--the theme of pirates and piracy, an age-old reality of the Mediterranean Sea. An Ottoman ruler decides to destroy a famous corsair, who strikes first. The corsair loses the battle, but gains the love of the ruler's daughter, who frees him--only to encounter a great tragedy. The fourth story, Lara, both is and is not a sequel to The Corsair. Characters and themes are carried over, but with many changes, and the feeling of the story is rema
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Description:

We hope you will enjoy these fine, old-fashioned stories that Lord Byron wrote in an old-fashioned way. He tells these tales in rhyming verse and heroic couplets, and he makes them dashing, romantic, and even melodramatic in a way that has become foreign to us with the passing of time. These are tales of the Ottoman Empire, the Turkish empire that, in Lord Byron's day, encompassed what we now know as the Middle East from Iran to Morocco, the modern nation of Turkey, and the Balkans as well--modern Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania and the other Balkan nations. Byron traveled extensively in the Empire and learned about its history and customs. He then passed what he learned through his own romantic temperament and imagination, and through his fascination with men with darkly troubled souls and the women they love and who love them. In these five stories we find love and honor lost and won, hearts and cities conquered and broken, and a constant struggle to find something higher, deeper and finer in life than what comes to the common lot of humanity. The first story, The Giaour, is about a Christian knight living in Ottoman Greece. The word "giaour" was the Ottoman term for any Christian. He falls in love with a woman from the Pacha's harem--a love unlikely to succeed. The second story, The Bride of Abydos, is about the love of a man with a secret past for the daughter of a powerful local ruler. He reveals his secret to her, but only at the moment when war erupts between him and her father. The Corsair, the third story, picks up on an idea that appears in The Bride of Abydos--the theme of pirates and piracy, an age-old reality of the Mediterranean Sea. An Ottoman ruler decides to destroy a famous corsair, who strikes first. The corsair loses the battle, but gains the love of the ruler's daughter, who frees him--only to encounter a great tragedy. The fourth story, Lara, both is and is not a sequel to The Corsair. Characters and themes are carried over, but with many changes, and the feeling of the story is rema

Language:

English

Narrators:

Robert Bethune

Length:

5h 15m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

03:58


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

05:03


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

01:57


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

03:07


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

05:40


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

03:13


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

04:21


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

03:45


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

07:40


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

04:42


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

04:14


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

04:05


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

06:19


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:12


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

01:32


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

06:49


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

04:09


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

07:32


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

04:20


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

04:18


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

05:52


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

06:36


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

07:30


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

04:35


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

04:34


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

03:22


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

04:56


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

06:10


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

06:53


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

02:23


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

06:06


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

03:31


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

05:44


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

05:40


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

05:13


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

06:29


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

05:08


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

06:23


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

04:34


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:06


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

03:25


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

07:13


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

05:03


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

05:19


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

06:13


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

03:06


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

05:05


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

03:34


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

06:33


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

05:57


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

05:25


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

03:34


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

04:16


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

02:28


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

02:17


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

05:41


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

04:40


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

04:15


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

05:30


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

05:47


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

03:56


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

05:22


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

05:14


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

05:09


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

00:53