the Prisoner of Chillon and Other Poems - Poetry of Lord Byron-logo

the Prisoner of Chillon and Other Poems - Poetry of Lord Byron

Lord Byron

This volume of The Poetry of Lord Byron is focused on work in which Byron dealt with certain themes that recurred throughout his career, especially personal integrity in the search for freedom and for love, and the suffering that can go with that search. The Prisoner of Chillon, the keynote piece of this volume, is one of Byron’s most riveting pieces. Based on the true story of Francois Bonivard, it tells its story of political repression and human endurance in the voice of the last of three brothers imprisoned in the bowels of the castle at Chillon and left to rot. The Age of Bronze is Byron's sardonic look at the great-power maneuverings of his day. Beppo is a comic look at the eternal triangle and how Italian mores of his day found it actually rather convenient. The Island is Byron's re-imagining of the fate of the mutineers from the H. M. S. Bounty. His real interest seems to lie in unrolling a romantic adventure, and he manages it quite well. Mazeppa is equally romantic. A tale of war and love, it is told as reminiscence from the youth of an old general, who went through combat, torture, and near death when he found himself in love with a warlord's wife. The Ode on Venice is an elegy for Venice as Byron saw it: a city fallen on hard times from former greatness. The degradation of the Venetian Republic is contrasted with the rise of the United States as a home of freedom for mankind. Parisina tells the tale of the revenge of an Italian prince on his unfaithful wife and illegitimate son. Power conquers love through brutality: an outcome that does not cause Byron to flinch. A section of poems from 1816 includes poems of deep mystery, such as The Dream and Darkness alongside poems of regret, such as A Fragment and Churchill's Grave. Finally, Byron left us a series of poems about Napoleon Bonaparte, in which we can trace, over the span of some years, Byron's shifting feelings about the emperor, sometimes seen as a bulwark of freedom, other time seen as a victim of his own pride and power.

This volume of The Poetry of Lord Byron is focused on work in which Byron dealt with certain themes that recurred throughout his career, especially personal integrity in the search for freedom and for love, and the suffering that can go with that search. The Prisoner of Chillon, the keynote piece of this volume, is one of Byron’s most riveting pieces. Based on the true story of Francois Bonivard, it tells its story of political repression and human endurance in the voice of the last of three brothers imprisoned in the bowels of the castle at Chillon and left to rot. The Age of Bronze is Byron's sardonic look at the great-power maneuverings of his day. Beppo is a comic look at the eternal triangle and how Italian mores of his day found it actually rather convenient. The Island is Byron's re-imagining of the fate of the mutineers from the H. M. S. Bounty. His real interest seems to lie in unrolling a romantic adventure, and he manages it quite well. Mazeppa is equally romantic. A tale of war and love, it is told as reminiscence from the youth of an old general, who went through combat, torture, and near death when he found himself in love with a warlord's wife. The Ode on Venice is an elegy for Venice as Byron saw it: a city fallen on hard times from former greatness. The degradation of the Venetian Republic is contrasted with the rise of the United States as a home of freedom for mankind. Parisina tells the tale of the revenge of an Italian prince on his unfaithful wife and illegitimate son. Power conquers love through brutality: an outcome that does not cause Byron to flinch. A section of poems from 1816 includes poems of deep mystery, such as The Dream and Darkness alongside poems of regret, such as A Fragment and Churchill's Grave. Finally, Byron left us a series of poems about Napoleon Bonaparte, in which we can trace, over the span of some years, Byron's shifting feelings about the emperor, sometimes seen as a bulwark of freedom, other time seen as a victim of his own pride and power.
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Description:

This volume of The Poetry of Lord Byron is focused on work in which Byron dealt with certain themes that recurred throughout his career, especially personal integrity in the search for freedom and for love, and the suffering that can go with that search. The Prisoner of Chillon, the keynote piece of this volume, is one of Byron’s most riveting pieces. Based on the true story of Francois Bonivard, it tells its story of political repression and human endurance in the voice of the last of three brothers imprisoned in the bowels of the castle at Chillon and left to rot. The Age of Bronze is Byron's sardonic look at the great-power maneuverings of his day. Beppo is a comic look at the eternal triangle and how Italian mores of his day found it actually rather convenient. The Island is Byron's re-imagining of the fate of the mutineers from the H. M. S. Bounty. His real interest seems to lie in unrolling a romantic adventure, and he manages it quite well. Mazeppa is equally romantic. A tale of war and love, it is told as reminiscence from the youth of an old general, who went through combat, torture, and near death when he found himself in love with a warlord's wife. The Ode on Venice is an elegy for Venice as Byron saw it: a city fallen on hard times from former greatness. The degradation of the Venetian Republic is contrasted with the rise of the United States as a home of freedom for mankind. Parisina tells the tale of the revenge of an Italian prince on his unfaithful wife and illegitimate son. Power conquers love through brutality: an outcome that does not cause Byron to flinch. A section of poems from 1816 includes poems of deep mystery, such as The Dream and Darkness alongside poems of regret, such as A Fragment and Churchill's Grave. Finally, Byron left us a series of poems about Napoleon Bonaparte, in which we can trace, over the span of some years, Byron's shifting feelings about the emperor, sometimes seen as a bulwark of freedom, other time seen as a victim of his own pride and power.

Language:

English

Narrators:

Robert Bethune

Length:

5h 8m


Chapters

Chapter 1
Chapter 1

00:16


Chapter 2
Chapter 2

00:44


Chapter 3
Chapter 3

00:57


Chapter 4
Chapter 4

05:43


Chapter 5
Chapter 5

05:54


Chapter 6
Chapter 6

06:11


Chapter 7
Chapter 7

00:41


Chapter 8
Chapter 8

07:34


Chapter 9
Chapter 9

08:24


Chapter 10
Chapter 10

08:34


Chapter 11
Chapter 11

08:23


Chapter 12
Chapter 12

04:51


Chapter 13
Chapter 13

00:39


Chapter 14
Chapter 14

06:56


Chapter 15
Chapter 15

05:47


Chapter 16
Chapter 16

06:39


Chapter 17
Chapter 17

07:47


Chapter 18
Chapter 18

07:48


Chapter 19
Chapter 19

05:56


Chapter 20
Chapter 20

06:28


Chapter 21
Chapter 21

06:20


Chapter 22
Chapter 22

07:09


Chapter 23
Chapter 23

07:26


Chapter 24
Chapter 24

07:34


Chapter 25
Chapter 25

00:43


Chapter 26
Chapter 26

09:15


Chapter 27
Chapter 27

00:41


Chapter 28
Chapter 28

05:02


Chapter 29
Chapter 29

05:33


Chapter 30
Chapter 30

03:48


Chapter 31
Chapter 31

05:54


Chapter 32
Chapter 32

04:40


Chapter 33
Chapter 33

02:46


Chapter 34
Chapter 34

00:31


Chapter 35
Chapter 35

05:38


Chapter 36
Chapter 36

04:25


Chapter 37
Chapter 37

04:53


Chapter 38
Chapter 38

04:57


Chapter 39
Chapter 39

05:11


Chapter 40
Chapter 40

05:10


Chapter 41
Chapter 41

05:16


Chapter 42
Chapter 42

04:55


Chapter 43
Chapter 43

00:58


Chapter 44
Chapter 44

02:19


Chapter 45
Chapter 45

02:27


Chapter 46
Chapter 46

04:43


Chapter 47
Chapter 47

02:38


Chapter 48
Chapter 48

00:57


Chapter 49
Chapter 49

10:49


Chapter 50
Chapter 50

00:44


Chapter 51
Chapter 51

07:59


Chapter 52
Chapter 52

00:25


Chapter 53
Chapter 53

01:46


Chapter 54
Chapter 54

01:52


Chapter 55
Chapter 55

04:28


Chapter 56
Chapter 56

02:07


Chapter 57
Chapter 57

00:42


Chapter 58
Chapter 58

01:42


Chapter 59
Chapter 59

07:43


Chapter 60
Chapter 60

10:28


Chapter 61
Chapter 61

06:51


Chapter 62
Chapter 62

09:05


Chapter 63
Chapter 63

08:03


Chapter 64
Chapter 64

04:27


Chapter 65
Chapter 65

00:54