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Southword Poetry Podcast

Arts & Culture Podcasts

The Southword Poetry Podcast is produced by the Munster Literature Centre. Each episode, a guest poet talks in depth about their latest work and shares a few of their poems. We also hear a poem from a recent issue of the literary journal Southword. Sarah Byrne hosted the 2022 season. Clíona Ní Ríordáin hosted the 2024 season. Poets were selected by the hosts, Patrick Cotter and James O’Leary. The Munster Literature Centre is a grateful recipient of funding from the Arts Council of Ireland and the Arts Office of Cork City Council.

Location:

Ireland

Description:

The Southword Poetry Podcast is produced by the Munster Literature Centre. Each episode, a guest poet talks in depth about their latest work and shares a few of their poems. We also hear a poem from a recent issue of the literary journal Southword. Sarah Byrne hosted the 2022 season. Clíona Ní Ríordáin hosted the 2024 season. Poets were selected by the hosts, Patrick Cotter and James O’Leary. The Munster Literature Centre is a grateful recipient of funding from the Arts Council of Ireland and the Arts Office of Cork City Council.

Language:

English

Contact:

00353214322396


Episodes
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Thomas McCarthy: Prophecy

6/27/2024
(0:00) - Clíona Ní Ríordáin and Patrick Cotter Discussion (24:23) - Thomas McCarthy interview (1:06:53) - Southword poem, The Woman Who Used To Bleed by Lorraine McArdle Thomas McCarthy was born in Co. Waterford and educated at UCC. His many collections of poetry include Pandemonium (2016) and Prophecy (2019). A former Editor of Poetry Ireland Review, he is a member of Aosdána. His diaries, Poetry, Memory and the Party, were published in 2022 by The Gallery Press. His essays will be published by The Gallery later this year and his new collection, Plenitude, will be published by Carcanet Press UK in Spring 2025. This week's Southword poem is ‘The Woman Who Used To Bleed' by Lorraine McArdle, which appears in issue 43. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:01:08:59

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Abigail Parry: I Think We're Alone Now

4/23/2024
(0:00) - Clíona Ní Ríordáin and James O'Leary Discussion (4:00) - Abigail Parry interview (47:23) - Southword poem, My Poetry Isn’t Art Enough by Pragya Gogoi I Think We’re Alone Now was supposed to be a book about intimacy: what it might look like in solitude, in partnership, and in terms of collective responsibility. Instead, the poems are preoccupied with pop music, etymology, surveillance equipment and cervical examination, church architecture and beetles. Just about anything, in fact, except what intimacy is or looks like. So this is a book that runs on failure, and also a book about failures: of language to do what we want, of connection to be meaningful or mutual, and of the analytic approach to say anything useful about what we are to one another. Here are abrupt estrangements and errors of translation, frustrations and ellipses, failed investigations. And beetles.I Think We’re Alone Now is Abigail Parry's second collection. Her first collection, Jinx (Bloodaxe Books, 2018), was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for Best First Collection 2018 and the Seamus Heaney Centre First Collection Poetry Prize 2019. This week's Southword poem is ‘My Poetry Isn’t Art Enough' by Pragya Gogoi, which appears in issue 43. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:50:05

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Paddy Bushe: Peripheral Vision

2/9/2024
(0:00) - Clíona Ní Ríordáin and Patrick Cotter Discussion (7:34) - Paddy Bushe interview (51:48) - Southword poem, Perault's Wolf by Tracy Gaughan Paddy Bushe was born in Dublin in 1948 and now lives in Waterville, Co. Kerry. He writes in Irish and in English and he is a member of Aosdána. He received the 2006 Oireachtas prize for poetry, the 2006 Michael Hartnett Poetry Award and the 2017 Irish Times Poetry Now Award. In 2020, Dedalus Press published Double Vision, a two-volume publication comprising Second Sight, the author's own selection of his Irish language poems, accompanied by the author's own translations, as well as Peripheral Vision, his latest collection in English. This week's Southword poem is ‘Perault's Wolf’ by Tracy Gaughan, which appears in issue 43. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:53:56

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Paul Muldoon: Howdie-Skelp

12/21/2022
Paul Muldoon is the author of fourteen collections of poetry, including Moy Sand and Gravel, for which he received the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, and the most recent, Howdie-Skelp (2021). His other awards include the 1994 T. S. Eliot Prize, the 2003 Griffin Prize, the 2015 Pigott Prize, and the 2017 Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. Born in County Armagh in 1951, he has lived sine 1987 in the United States, where he is the Howard G. B. Clark Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University. This week's Southword poem is ‘Last’ by Amy Woolard, which appears in issue 43. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:25:21

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Ishion Hutchinson: House of Lords and Commons

11/24/2022
Ishion Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica. He is the author of two poetry collections: Far District and House of Lords and Commons. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize, the Whiting Writers Award, the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award, the Windham-Campbell Prize for Poetry and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, among others. He is a contributing editor to the literary journals The Common and Tongue: A Journal of Writing & Art and teaches in the graduate writing program at Cornell University. This week's Southword poem is ‘Elegy’ by Olaitan Humble, which appears in issue 43. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:40:13

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Susannah Dickey: Oh!

11/6/2022
Susannah Dickey grew up in Derry and now lives in London. She is the author of four poetry pamphlets, I had some very slight concerns (2017), genuine human values (2018), bloodthirsty for marriage (2020), and Oh! (2022). In 2019 she won the Vincent Buckley Poetry Prize, and in 2021 she was longlisted for the Sunday Times Short Story Award. She is an Eric Gregory Award winner, a prize granted for a collection by poets under the age of 30. Her debut poetry collection, Isdal, will be published in 2023. She is the author of Tennis Lessons (2020) and Common Decency (2022), both published by Doubleday UK. This week's Southword poem is ‘Lagan’ by Niamh Prior, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:40:17

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Dean Browne: Kitchens at Night

10/23/2022
Dean Browne won the Geoffrey Dearmer Prize in 2021 and his pamphlet, Kitchens at Night, was a winner of the Poetry Business International Pamphlet Competition; it was published by Smith|Doorstop in 2022. His poems have appeared widely in journals such as Banshee, Poetry (Chicago), Poetry Ireland Review, Poetry Review, PN Review, Southword, The Stinging Fly, and elsewhere. This week's Southword poem is ‘Egyptian Wing’ by Heather Treseler, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:28:51

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Molly Twomey: Raised Among Vultures

10/9/2022
Molly Twomey grew up in Lismore, County Waterford, and graduated in 2019 with an MA in Creative Writing from University College Cork. She has been published in Poetry Review, Poetry Ireland Review, Banshee, The Irish Times, Mslexia, The Stinging Fly and elsewhere. She runs an online international poetry event, Just to Say, sponsored by Jacar Press. In 2021, she was chosen for Poetry Ireland’s Introductions series and awarded an Arts Council Literature Bursary. Her debut collection, Raised Among Vultures, will be published in May 2022 with The Gallery Press. This week's Southword poem is ‘Reading Ilya Kaminsky’ by Gerard Smyth, which appears in issue 42. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:36:00

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Shangyang Fang: Burying the Mountain

9/25/2022
Shangyang Fang grew up in Chengdu, China, and composes poems both in English and Chinese. While studying civil engineering at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, he realized his bigger passion lies in the architecture of language and became a poetry fellow at Michener Center for Writers. He is the recipient of the Joy Harjo Poetry Award and Gregory O’Donoghue International Poetry Prize. His name, Shangyang, originating from Chinese mythology, was a one-legged bird whose dance brought forth flood and rain. His debut is Burying the Mountain from Copper Canyon Press. This week's Southword poem is ‘The Last Kodak Moment’ by Timothy McBride, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:41:36

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Ciaran O'Driscoll: Angel Hour

9/11/2022
Ciaran O’Driscoll lives in Limerick. A member of Aosdána, he has published ten books of poetry, including Gog and Magog (1987), Moving On, Still There: New and Selected Poems (2001), and Surreal Man (2006). His work has been translated into many languages. Angel Hour (SurVision, 2021) is his most recent full collection. Liverpool University Press published his childhood memoir, A Runner Among Falling Leaves (2001). His novel, A Year’s Midnight, was published by Pighog Press (2012). His awards include the James Joyce Prize and the Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry. His poem ‘Please Hold’ (featured in Forward’s anthology Poems of the Decade (2011) has become a set text for A Level English Literature. Five of his poems are included in the forthcoming anthology Contemporary Surrealist and Magical Realist Poetry, edited by Jonas Danys (Lamar University Literary Press, USA). This week's Southword poem is ‘Sept 13th, 2001’ by Dante Micheaux, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:42:45

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Jenna Clake: Museum of Ice Cream

8/29/2022
Jenna Clake's debut collection of poetry Fortune Cookie won the Melita Hume prize in 2016, and was published in 2017 by Eyewear. It received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors in 2018, and was shortlisted for a Somerset Maugham Award in the same year. Her second collection Museum of Ice Cream was published by Bloodaxe in 2021. Her debut novel Disturbance will be published by Trapeze (UK) and Norton (US) in 2023. Follow her on Twitter. This week's Southword poem is 'The Quarry Lake' by Bernadette McCarthy, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:42:39

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Cameron Awkward-Rich: Dispatch

8/15/2022
Cameron Awkward-Rich is the author of two collections of poetry: Sympathetic Little Monster (Ricochet Editions, 2016) and Dispatch (Persea Books, 2019). His creative work has been supported by fellowships from Cave Canem, The Watering Hole, and the Lannan Foundation. Also a scholar of trans theory and expressive culture in the U.S., Cameron earned his PhD from Stanford University's program in Modern Thought & Literature. His more critical writing can be found in Signs, Trans Studies Quarterly, American Quarterly and elsewhere, and has been supported by fellowships from Duke University's Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and the ACLS. His book The Terrible We: Thinking with Trans Maladjustment is forthcoming from Duke University Press in Fall 2022. Presently, he is an assistant professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. This week's Southword poem is Puerto Lopez by Mark Roper, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:42:14

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Victoria Kennefick: Eat or We Both Starve

8/1/2022
Victoria Kennefick's debut poetry collection, Eat or We Both Starve (Carcanet, 2021), won the Seamus Heaney First Collection Poetry Prize 2022 and was awarded the Dalkey Book Festival Emerging Writer of the Year 2022. Most recently, it has been shortlisted for the Derek Walcott Prize for Poetry 2022. In 2021, it was shortlisted for both the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Costa Poetry Book Award. It was a book of the year in The Guardian, The Irish Times, The Telegraph, The Sunday Independent and The White Review. Her pamphlet, White Whale (Southword Editions, 2015), won the Munster Literature Centre’s Fool for Poetry International Chapbook Competition and the Saboteur Award for Best Poetry Pamphlet. Victoria is the current poet-in-residence at the Yeats Society Sligo. This week's Southword poem is 'My Eyes' by Dermot Bolger, which appears in issue 41. You can buy single issues, subscribe, or find out how to submit to Southword here.

Duration:00:37:51

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Episode 1 Coming 1st August

7/12/2022
The Southword Poetry Podcast, hosted by Sarah Byrne, launches it's first episode on 1st August with guest poet Victoria Kennefick. Released every two weeks, we'll have ten episodes in 2022. Produced by the Munster Literature Centre https://www.munsterlit.ie/

Duration:00:00:29