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The Critic Podcast

Arts & Culture Podcasts

A weekly mix of current affairs and culture from the team behind Britain's new magazine for open-minded readers See https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A weekly mix of current affairs and culture from the team behind Britain's new magazine for open-minded readers See https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Location:

United States

Description:

A weekly mix of current affairs and culture from the team behind Britain's new magazine for open-minded readers See https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Language:

English


Episodes

125: Mistletoe and whine

11/25/2022
Sebastian Milbank and Ben Sixsmith join forces once again to discuss Americanisation, commercialisation, the real roots of Christmas and the ideal present for the whole family.

Duration:00:27:14

124: World War E

11/17/2022
Ben Sixsmith and Sebastian Milbank discuss social media, Elon Musk, the corruption of online spaces and their least favourite Twitter accounts.

Duration:00:34:09

123: The red ripple

11/10/2022
Ben Sixsmith and Sebastian Milbank discuss the American midterms, their implications for the rest of the world, and why the hell Britons are so obsessed with the USA in the first place.

Duration:00:31:45

122: Our first Californian PM?

11/3/2022
Online Editor Sebastian Milbank joins Contributing Editor Ben Sixsmith to discuss the prospects of the new Tory government, the media's Suella obsession, and why Sunak may be our first Californian Prime Minister.

Duration:00:44:21

121: Bye-bye Boris

7/7/2022
In this podcast, The Critic's deputy editor, Graham Stewart, talks to the magazine's parliamentary sketchwriter, Rob Hutton, about covering the Prime Minister's downfall. Picture: Boris Johnson addresses the nation as he announces his resignation outside 10 Downing Street, on 7 July 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

120: Tribes of Westminster: Steve Baker MP, Christian Libertarian

6/14/2022
The Tribes of Westminster is a new monthly podcast co-produced by the Critic and the New Social Covenant Unit, seeking to unearth the intellectual roots of Westminster. This month Steve Baker MP speaks to Danny Kruger MP, Online Editor of the Critic, Sebastian Milbank, and Imogen Sinclair, Director of the NSCU, about his Christian libertarianism.

119: The not-so-beautiful game

6/3/2022
In the June 2022 issue of The Critic, Nick Timothy wrote that football needed to “search its conscience”, regarding the growing trend of clubs selling their own “fan tokens” — a sort of club-labelled crypto product, which can be bought and sold at prices that rise and fall according to demand. In this podcast, The Critic's literary editor, Paul Lay, talks to The Critic's Sporting Life correspondent, Nick Timothy, about the wider issue of morality — and immorality — in football.

118: In conversation with Laura Dodsworth

5/18/2022
Olivia Hartley and Laura Dodsworth discuss Laura's article for the May 2022 issue of The Critic, "The false euphoria of dysphoria", the kickback she received against her piece, and the state of feminism today.

117: What would Boris do if he had to resign?

5/7/2022
Most ex-Prime Ministers struggle with life after Downing Street. But would Boris bounce back and, if so, in what role? In this podcast, his former Telegraph colleague, James Kirkup — along with Rob Hutton and Christopher Montgomery — discuss with Graham Stewart whether there is life after power for Boris Johnson.

116: New Labour, new danger?

5/1/2022
Historian of the Labour movement Anthony Broxton talks to Critic online editor Sebastian Milbank to mark 25 years since the 1997 election that saw Tony Blair sweep to power. They ask what lessons the modern left can draw from his example.

115: In Sparta: How Brexit happened

3/29/2022
Three years ago the UK had been due to leave the EU. But on the same day, 28 MPs voted against Theresa May's EU Withdrawal deal and hoped for a clean break. They became known as the Spartans and played a pivotal role in ousting Theresa May and securing a much greater break with the EU. David Scullion speaks to three with veteran lobby journalist Robert Hutton.

114: Is NATO to blame for the war in Ukraine?

3/3/2022
Journalist, author and Mail on Sunday columnist Peter Hitchens joins Professor Adrian Pabst, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research to discuss the role of Western foreign policy in bringing about war in Ukraine.

113: Remembering Richard Shepherd

3/2/2022
Sir Richard Shepherd, for 35 years an independently minded Conservative MP, died last month. How should he be remembered? As a Eurosceptic and a natural rebel, certainly, and also as the founder of Partridges - one of London's most loved food shops. But was he, at heart, a libertarian or a traditional Tory or an old school Liberal? Joining The Critic's deputy editor, Graham Stewart, to discuss Richard Shepherd's life in politics in this podcast are his former parliamentary colleagues,...

112: Ukraine special

2/25/2022
Online Editor Sebastian Milbank hosts a special Critic Podcast special reacting to Russian's invasion of the Ukraine. He's joined by Patrick Porter, Professor of International Security and Strategy of the University of Birmingham, and Sam Ashworth-Hayes, Director of Studies at the Henry Jackson Society to discuss the conflict and its implications for the West.

111: Is levelling up the answer to Britain's problems?

2/24/2022
On this episode of The Critic Podcast Professor Adrian Pabst, Alys Denby and Imogen Sinclair discuss whether the government's levelling up agenda is enough to reverse decades of regional inequality, and whether the right prescription is state intervention, civil society or the free market.

110: Julie Bindel in conversation with Raquel Rosario Sanchez

2/3/2022
Raquel Rosario Sanchez is going to court to fight a trial against the University of Bristol for failing to protect her from bullying and harassment by trans activists. The case begins on the 7th February, and you can support Raquel here: https://www.crowdjustice.com/case/bullying-and-harassment-enable-bristol-university/. Julie Bindel asks her about her story, and how she has coped.

109: Is the myth of the “plucky Brit" false?

12/14/2021
On this episode of The Critic podcast, Deputy Editor Graham Stewart is joined by Professor Phillips O'Brien and The Critic's sketch-writer Robert Hutton to discuss whether the wartime myth of the “plucky Brit“ is an accurate way of viewing Britain in the 1940s.

London gossip, Dickensian Christmasses and experimental castles

12/10/2021
Welcome back to The Critic Narrated, where we bring you a selection of articles from our print issues, read aloud by their authors. In this episode, Robert Thicknesse narrates his Man About Town column from the December/January double issue, Welcome to Londongrad; Alexander Larman laments the myth of the Victorian Christmas for this issue's sacred cow, and, in his architecture column, Charles Saumarez Smith says that Jonathan Ruffer’s daring philanthropic experiment with Auckland Castle...

Fast food and stolen goods

12/3/2021
Welcome back to The Critic Narrated, where we bring you a selection of articles from our print issues, read aloud by their authors. In this episode, Felipe Fernández-Armesto says that empty shelves need not mean dreary eating in his column from the December/January issue of The Critic: “The art of fast food”, while Daisy Dunn narrates her book review of Mary Beard's Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern, and Michael Prodger reads aloud his art column from...

Unexpected music and a crisis of theology

11/26/2021
Welcome back to The Critic Narrated, where we bring you a selection of articles from our print issues, read aloud by their authors. In this episode, Sarah Ditum reveals the joy of letting unexpected, accidental music in as she narrates her column from the December/January issue of The Critic: “Strange Brew”, while David Scullion says the Church of England are woefully out of touch and with falling congregations, now faces a crisis of leadership and theology, as he reads his feature:...