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The Measure of Everyday Life

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Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following. The show is made possible by RTI International. Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.

Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following. The show is made possible by RTI International. Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following. The show is made possible by RTI International. Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.

Language:

English

Contact:

9195418037


Episodes

The Usefulness of Higher Education

12/11/2019
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Popular culture in the U.S. and elsewhere in recent years suggests college as a rite of passage that often comes right after high school. Is higher education currently useful and achievable for all, though? On this episode, we talk with Paul Tough about his book, The Years that Matter Most: How College Makes Us or Breaks Us.

Duration:00:30:07

Destigmatizing Women's Health

11/20/2019
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Our public silence about women's health can have implications for our collective health and well being. On this episode, we talk with Duke University's Libby Dotson about work at Duke to bring together medicine, engineering, and the arts for an innovative campaign to encourage more public consideration of women’s health.

Duration:00:29:38

Connecting Neighbors to Resources

11/13/2019
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Where you live and who you know and what services are available to you matters in shaping your health, which poses challenges to equity and well being. A new project team funded by Duke University's Bass Connections initiative and based at the Lincoln Community Health Center in Durham, NC, thinks student volunteers can help by facilitating resident ability to find available resources. In this episode, we talk with Janet Bettger and Sahil Sandhu of Duke University and Howard Eisenson of...

Duration:00:29:45

Talking about Obesity

11/6/2019
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Public health and medical researchers have spent considerable money and time assessing the negative consequences of high weight in people, yet relatively less time focused on the language we use to describe the condition. On this episode, we talk with Rebecca Puhl of the University of Connecticut about research on obesity framing, stigma, and interventions.

Duration:00:29:50

Ocean Protection and Social Intervention

10/30/2019
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Underneath the surface of any ocean, there are changes happening, changes that reflect our own behaviors. Our lives are bound up with the health of oceans and yet people sometimes overlook the scope of the problem and possibilities for future solutions. On this episode, we talk with David Gill, a faculty member with Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment and an expert in ocean conservation.

Duration:00:29:49

Remedies for Loneliness

10/23/2019
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For many people, loneliness is a private struggle and yet some researchers have argued that loneliness is widespread. On this episode, we talk with author Jillian Richardson, who has set out to do something concrete to address the plight of loneliness in contemporary America.

Duration:00:29:43

The Science of Disaster Shelters

10/16/2019
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In the wake of weather-related disasters, organizations often set up relief tools and shelters for people. What do we know about what works? How can we improve our practice? In this episode, we talk with Laura DiGrande of RTI International about her research in this area.

Duration:00:29:24

Trauma Relief through Alternative Medicine

10/9/2019
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When people endure trauma, how can we help them heal? Some researchers have argued that alternatives to the conventional medical practices used in places like the United States might help. On this episode we talk with James Gordon of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine and Georgetown Medical School about his book, The Transformation: Discovering Wholeness and Healing After Trauma.

Duration:00:28:33

Innovation at a Farmers Market

10/2/2019
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Innovation can improve our work in many different areas of life. Sometimes it springs from old ideas. On this episode, we talk with social science researcher Lanae Hood of Meredith College. When trying to improve nutrition among food assistance program participants, she looked outside and brought together community partners in one North Carolina town by taking an old idea that offered a new way to affect people's diets.

Duration:00:29:11

Self-compassion and Teenagers

9/25/2019
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Anyone who has spent time around a teenager knows rebellion and self-discovery are part of the experience. In our current world, though, many teenagers struggle with anxiety, depression, or confusion as well. Researchers are starting to learn about approaches that can help people of all ages, including teens. In this episode, we talk with Karen Bluth of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to talk about her innovative, evidence-based work to develop mental health tools for...

Duration:00:29:18

When a Researcher Becomes a Patient

9/18/2019
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Pamela Spain is a healthcare delivery expert who helps to translate research for a variety of audiences. She has done considerable work on cancer care. Recently, she was diagnosed with cancer. On this episode, we talk about her journey and its implications for future healthcare delivery research.

Duration:00:58:20

Social Science and Testing for Sexual Assault

9/11/2019
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In many jurisdictions around the United States, a bureaucratic trail of sexual assault evidence kits has sat largely unprocessed and unresolved. A team of researchers is using social science to understand the scope and underlying causes for that delay. On this episode, we talk with Patricia Melton of RTI International about her team's interdisciplinary work to improve how we address sexual assault reports.

Duration:00:29:21

New Technology and the Future of Surveys

8/28/2019
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Many of us can remember someone calling us at home on a landline phone or stopping us in a parking lot with a pencil and paper to ask survey questions. Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and other new technologies are transforming the work of measuring public opinion, though, and we seem to be at the dawn of a new chapter of survey research. Trent Buskirk of Bowling Green State University has been part of that story and he shares his forecasts for the future on this episode.

Duration:00:29:56

Middle School Education and Climate Literacy

8/21/2019
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Many news stories in recent years have referred to climate change and yet it isn’t yet clear how families are talking about the phenomenon or how that sort of discussion might matter for society. At least one team thinks that engagement with middle school students offers an important path forward. In this episode, we talk with Danielle Lawson of the College of Natural Resources at North Carolina State University.

Duration:00:29:17

Improving Bureaucracy through Organizational Research

8/14/2019
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Popular culture has tended to depict bureaucracy in a negative light but social science research has suggested some opportunities to model well-functioning organizations. In this episode, Leisha DeHart-Davis of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill talks about innovations in improving how bureaucracies function.

Duration:00:29:41

Journalists and Social Media

8/7/2019
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Social media platforms like Twitter offer snapshots of comments that people post publicly and so they offer an impression of popular sentiment but not the whole story in terms of public opinion. How are journalists using such tools in their own reporting? On this episode, we talk with Shannon McGregor of the University of Utah about her research on journalists and social media.

Duration:00:28:59

Employee Responses to Surveillance

7/24/2019
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Tools available for employers to monitor employee performance have evolved in recent decades. On this episode, we talk about employer surveillance from the perspective of employees with Dr. Julianne Payne of RTI International, a sociologist who studies workplaces.

Duration:00:29:46

Collaboration, Music, and Authorship

7/17/2019
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We often think of popular music as the product of a single person or group. What if we understood music to be a much more collaborative effort than that? On this episode we talk with Thomas Brothers, professor of music at Duke University, about his latest book, Help!: The Beatles, Duke Ellington, and the Magic of Collaboration.

Duration:00:29:47

Character Education

7/3/2019
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What should we teach our children in school about values? In this episode, we talk with Ian MacMullen. He teaches at Duke University and is author of multiple books including Civics Beyond Critics: Character Education in a Liberal Democracy.

Duration:00:29:24

Student Showcase (Navigating Student Life)

6/26/2019
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This episode features student-produced stories from the Duke University Social Science Radio Workshop. All of the stories highlight aspects of student life.

Duration:00:29:43