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"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth called an experiment to discover how far the language of everyday conversation is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure. With this publication, he set in motion the formal movement called "Romanticism." 220 years later the experiment is continued on this podcast. This podcast seeks to reach those of us who wish to improve our inner world, increase our stores of happiness, and yet not succumb to the mystical or the subjective.Here, in this place of the imagination, you will find many conversation with those humans creating things that interest the human mind.

"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth called an experiment to discover how far the language of everyday conversation is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure. With this publication, he set in motion the formal movement called "Romanticism." 220 years later the experiment is continued on this podcast. This podcast seeks to reach those of us who wish to improve our inner world, increase our stores of happiness, and yet not succumb to the mystical or the subjective.Here, in this place of the imagination, you will find many conversation with those humans creating things that interest the human mind.
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Location:

United States

Description:

"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth called an experiment to discover how far the language of everyday conversation is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure. With this publication, he set in motion the formal movement called "Romanticism." 220 years later the experiment is continued on this podcast. This podcast seeks to reach those of us who wish to improve our inner world, increase our stores of happiness, and yet not succumb to the mystical or the subjective.Here, in this place of the imagination, you will find many conversation with those humans creating things that interest the human mind.

Language:

English

Contact:

7148308098


Episodes

SMP #30 Introduction to the Songs of Innocence by William Blake

12/8/2019
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William Blake was the most eccentric of the Romantics. He was equally important in visual arts as well as poetry. His books included beautiful engravings all hand made, and for this reason he was not well known until the 20th century. A man opposed to oppression and repression of all times, in his work we see an imaginative mind building an entire world before our eyes. This first poem, "The Piper" is from The Songs of Innocence and it serves as the introduction to this book.

Duration:00:39:53

SMP #29 Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth

12/1/2019
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This episode was recording during the holidays 2019. The Holidays are a time of reflections on your past as you prepare for New Years Eve resolutions for your future. Can recollecting your past be done improperly? Is it an infallible process? If it is not infallible, what should we do about it? These are some of the themes we will see in Tintern Abbey by Wordsworth. The full title of this poem is Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a...

Duration:01:41:48

SMP #28 The Complaint of a Forsaken Indian Woman by William Wordsworth

11/24/2019
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This is one of Wordsworth's most far-reaching poems. It takes place in a land he never set foot on: America. Based on stories he read about traveling tribes of American Indians, he wrote this harrowing tale about a woman who is too sick to continue walking with her tribe, so they abandon her.

Duration:00:32:50

SMP #27 Old Man Travelling: Animal Tranquility and Decay, a Sketch by William Wordsworth

11/17/2019
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In the Oxford Book of English Verse, edited by Christopher Ricks, there are 9 William Wordsworth poems. Old Man Travelling, animal tranquility and decay was selected twice. Like many of Wordsworth's best poems, this one power is so subtle it is easy to miss it. However, it is poetry and art par excellence. Since the poem is so short I do not wish to spoil the exhilerating emotional revelation that occurs in a renewed investigation into this poem, so I will merely say that the experience...

Duration:00:28:34

SMP #26 The Convict by William Wordsworth

11/10/2019
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In November, 2019 the state of Oklahoma released almost 500 "non-violent" criminals in the largest commutation in US history. This brought up many issues regarding the justice system and the court system. But it also brings up a critical issue about the role and goals of the penal system. Can convicts be reformed? If it is possible then what is in our best interest to support? If a convict CAN be reformed, then should not not attempt to help them do so? And at the very least, should we not...

Duration:00:49:05

SMP #25 The Female Vagrant by William Wordsworth

11/6/2019
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The Female Vagrant is one of Wordsworth's most political poems. It tells the story two wanderers seeking shelter during a stormy night on Salisbury Plain in England. The woman tells how she came to be destitute and alone: her father had been evicted from his cottage in the Lakes by a wealthy industrialist neighbor, she had married but the advent of war had ruined them and, in a last desperate attempt to support her and their children, he volunteered for the army. He is shipped to fight in...

Duration:01:24:42

SMP #24 The Tables Turned, An Evening Scene on the Same Subject by William Wordsworth

11/3/2019
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In this special episode I quote several passages from William Wordsworth's prefaces to the Lyrical Ballads and passages from C. Bradley Thompson's newest book "America's Revolutionary Mind." My argument is that Wordsworth, in telling people to put away their books and look to Nature is reflecting a philosophical view from Isaac Newton and John Locke. Up ! up ! my friend, and clear your looks, Why all this toil and trouble ? Up ! up ! my friend, and quit your books, Or surely you’ll grow...

Duration:00:50:42

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

10/31/2019
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I am releasing this poem on Halloween, because it is indeed a horror story. In fact, it was so terrifying that when the young Mary Shelley first heard a reading of it, she hid behind a chair. Today, this poem may not terrify us in the way that it did people at the time, but I will be making two big arguments as to why you should challenge yourself to read poems like this even if you at first do not like them. Coleridge's Mariner may be one of the most influential poems of the British...

Duration:01:53:17

Conversation with Screenwriter and Poet, Paul Guay

10/30/2019
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Paul Guay conceived and co-wrote "Liar, Liar" and co-wrote "The Little Rascals" and "Heartbreakers." We had a wonderful conversation about movies and movie making, art and culture, the changing tide of media, being a writer and the writing process, Paul's love of WWE, his filmmaking experiences, the Auteur Theory of FIlmmaking and much much more. If you are interested in how movies are made, how to make a career in Hollywood, how the landscape is changing as well as the art of cinema,...

Duration:02:12:00

SMP #24 Expostulation and Reply by William Wordsworth

10/27/2019
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In his conversation poem, "Expostulation and Reply," William Wordsworth brings the art of argument into poetry. A school teacher, Matthew, trained in the classical method of jamming facts into people's foreheads, admonishes young William for sitting out in nature and contemplating it. “Up! Up! and drink the spirit breath’d / “From dead men to their kind," he says. In other words, get out of nature and read your books young Willy! Well, you can imagine the young romantic poet had something...

Duration:00:34:28

MM #9 "Air and Angels" By John Donne

10/21/2019
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The ultimate question of the sexes: Do men love women more than Women love Men? Donne argues that his masculine love is superior than the love his woman feels for him. Maybe that's why he had such trouble with women? In this (very challenging) poem we will see two major analogies: Masculine love and angels. To understand this analogy I am going to share with you some important PRE-Newtonian concepts about the world in which we inhabit. The best way to understand history is to live it and...

Duration:00:37:43

SMP #23 Lines Written near Richmond, Upon the Thames, at Evening, By William Wordsworth

10/20/2019
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There is deep value in removing yourself from your own skin and entering the skin of another person. Only through poetry and literature and painting can we exercise this ability of humans. And in this poem, Wordsworth teaching you how Lines Written Near Richmond, upon the Thames at Evening By William Wordworth How rich the wave, in front, imprest With evening-twilight’s summer hues, While, facing thus the crimson west, The boat her silent path pursues! And see how dark the backward...

Duration:00:52:55

The Idiot Boy by William Wordsworth

10/16/2019
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On this special episode I will read The Idiot Boy by William Wordsworth. This poem was published in the 1798 Lyrical Ballads and it was very controversial. Yet, it is a beautifully written poem. I spend the majority of the time simply reading the poem. I hope you enjoy the reading! At the end I give a small critique of Wordsworth's philosophy, but mostly I defend him and Romanticism from the cliche attacks toward Romanticism. THE IDIOT BOY By William Wordsworth ‘Tis eight o’clock, – a...

Duration:00:55:46

Metaphysical Mondays #8: The Triple Fool by John Donne

10/7/2019
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Ah to love is to be a fool, to tell your love is to be a double fool. But to be a triple fool? How does one do that? John Donne will show you how. In this special episode I go in to this poem with no prep. That means you will experience a live analysis and exploration of this poem. There will be times when I say "oh I was wrong about that interpretation, I'm quite sure it means this." And, "hmm what does this mean!?" I hope by the end you will see that there is intense exercise for the...

Duration:00:26:32

SMP #22 "The Dungeon" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

10/6/2019
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What is the purpose of a penal system? Is it strictly to punish or can it be to reform? If it can reform what are the best methods of accomplishing this? The romanticist Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote a poem called The Dungeon, which is a soliloqouy from a man who resides in a medieval dungeon. He is lamenting more than his own personal situation, but the idea of what man has made of man. Do dungeons and prisons truly work for the guilty? Or do they make their souls even more rotted than...

Duration:00:38:01

A Poet for All Times: Quent Cordair Conversation

10/1/2019
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I had the pleasure of visiting the Quent Cordair Fine Art Gallery in Napa Valley and chatting with poet, painter, author, novelist, Marine, businessman (etc etc!) Author Quent Cordair. William Wordsworth said that a poet is a "man speaking to men." This is certainly true of Quent Cordair's poetry. We chatted about his poetic influences and fiction and we dissected a Robert Frost poem along with two poems in Quent's latest book My Kingdom...

Duration:01:27:01

Metaphysical Mondays #7 The Canonization by John Donne

9/30/2019
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Do you know that annoying couple that is always so lovey dovey? You know the type, they wear matching clothes and finish each other's sentences? Well get prepared to meet a man who believes he is so in love that he believes they should be canonized forever. In "Canonization" John Donne makes a bizarre argument. Why can't two ideal lovers become canonized (made into saints by the Catholic Church?) This is bizarre because by ideal lovers, he does not mean platonic lovers. These are lovers in...

Duration:00:33:09

SMP #21 The Foster-Mother's Tale by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

9/29/2019
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In this episode I will give you two extreme models of education. One is best represented in the tale of Petronilla and the other is best represented in that of #gretathunberg A theme that runs throughout the 1798 Lyrical Ballads by Coleridge and Wordsworth is that of nature as educator for a child. In this poem—a fragment from a theatrical play by Coleridge—we see multiple viewpoints on education. One critical question we must answer is how much, if any, of the outside world and its social...

Duration:00:56:54

Metaphysical Mondays #6: The Sun Rising by John Donne

9/23/2019
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Have you ever laid in bed with your significant other and just wished you could lay there all day but the cares of the world kept fighting their way into your life? Well, John Donne knows how ya feel and he proposes you do something about it. As a Metaphysical Poet, witty and conceited, he proposes you start to command the sun, rather than the other way around. In this episode you will learn a bit about Medieval Cosmology and the Chain of Beings Theory of the universe. And you'll see how a...

Duration:00:45:08

SMP #20 The Last of the Flock

9/22/2019
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William Wordsworth changed the way we use language. He changed the way we investigate human beings. This is the romantic legacy. The usage of imagination to delve into the inner world of man. As Hugo put it "There is one thing grander than the ocean, that is the sky; there is one thing grander than the sky that is the interior of man's soul." This is one of the major projects of the romantics, to illustrate the depth of man's inner world. How, for instance, an event can cause a schism in...

Duration:00:48:51