The Week in Art

Arts & Culture Podcasts

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Location:

United Kingdom

Description:

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Twitter:

@tanaudio

Language:

English

Contact:

07939179302


Episodes

Ukraine museum collections: kept safe or looted? Plus, Okwui Enwezor’s Sharjah Biennial and Ming Smith at MoMA

2/3/2023
As we approach the first anniversary of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, The Art Newspaper has published an investigation that raises serious concerns that works of art taken by Russian troops from a museum in Kherson, Ukraine, in November 2022 may not be repatriated once the fighting ends. Our London correspondent Martin Bailey tells us about his story. Plus, the Sharjah Biennial opens next week, and is the final biennial curated by Okwui Enwezor, who died in 2019, but set the blueprint for...

Duration:00:52:45

Kusama x Louis Vuitton: art and luxury. Plus, Michael Rakowitz’s Tate/Iraq gift and photographer Rosy Martin

1/27/2023
This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand. What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public...

Duration:01:01:12

Van Gogh’s Sunflowers legal dispute. Plus, Singapore’s art scene and photographer Grace Lau

1/20/2023
Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Tokyo are the subject of a legal claim in the US relating to Nazi loot. The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent and resident Van Gogh expert Martin Bailey tells us why Sunflowers (1888-89) is at the centre of the dispute, 35 years after it was sold for a record price at auction, and why the heirs of the German Jewish banker Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, who owned it until the 1930s, now value it at a staggering $250m. Our editor-at-large Georgina Adam has...

Duration:00:40:39

The art world in 2023: market predictions, big shows, museum openings

1/13/2023
In the first episode of the year, we look ahead at the next 12 months. Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor at The Art Newspaper, peers into her crystal ball and tries to predict the fortunes of the art market this year. Then, Jane Morris, one of our editors-at-large, José da Silva, our exhibitions editor, and host Ben Luke select the museum projects, biennales and exhibitions that they are most looking forward to in 2023. Events discussed: The Grand Egyptian Museum: no confirmed...

Duration:01:14:25

2022’s biggest art stories—and what they mean

12/16/2022
It’s our final podcast of 2022 and so, as ever, we’re looking back at the worlds of art and heritage over the past 12 months. Ben Luke is joined by three members of The Art Newspaper team: Louisa Buck, contemporary art correspondent, Kabir Jhala, acting deputy art market editor, and Ben Sutton, editor in the Americas. Among much else, they discuss the effects of the war in Ukraine, Just Stop Oil’s activism, unionisation in US museums, the restitution of African and Native American (and...

Duration:01:14:54

Parthenon Marbles: breakthrough in sight? Plus, Afghan culture in crisis and Kiki Smith’s New York murals

12/9/2022
This week: the Parthenon Marbles; it has emerged that George Osborne, the former UK chancellor and now chair of the trustees of the British Museum, has been holding talks with the Greek government about the ancient sculptures. So might this lead to a breakthrough in the long-running dispute over their ownership? Ben Luke speaks to Yannis Andritsopoulos, the reporter for the Greek newspaper Ta Nea who broke the story. In Afghanistan, it is more than a year since the Taliban reclaimed power—so...

Duration:00:42:42

Feast and famine: Miami millions and UK arts cuts. Plus, Ukrainian Modernism in Madrid

12/2/2022
As Art Basel returns to Florida for the 20th anniversary of its Miami Beach art fair, Aimee Dawson, the acting digital editor at The Art Newspaper, talks to Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor, about the sales, news and talking points at the event that has become most synonymous with art-world excess. Meanwhile, after Arts Council England announced its funding allocation in November, arts organisations across the country, and especially in London, are reeling. Ben Luke talks to Jenni...

Duration:00:57:48

Pussy Riot and Ragnar Kjartansson; Shirin Neshat on Iran; Puerto Rican art after Hurricane Maria

11/25/2022
This week: as the exhibition Velvet Terrorism: Pussy Riot’s Russia opens at the Kling & Bang gallery in Reykjavik, Ben Luke talks to Masha Alekhina, one of the founding members of Pussy Riot, and the artist Ragnar Kjartansson, one of the co-curators of the show. As protests continue across Iran, Aimee Dawson, The Art Newspaper’s acting digital editor, speaks to Shirin Neshat, the artist whose work expressing solidarity with women in Iran was recently installed outside the Neue...

Duration:01:07:56

Art at Qatar’s World Cup; New York auctions; Mozambican artist Luis Meque

11/18/2022
Ben Luke talks to Hannah McGivern, a correspondent for The Art Newspaper who has just been to Qatar, about the vast number of public art projects that will accompany the FIFA Men’s World Cup that begins there on Sunday 20 November. She also discusses the museums that Qatar plans to open by 2030. How does this explosion of cultural initiatives sit with Qatar’s record on human rights and treatment of low-paid migrant workers in the building of its cultural venues and World Cup stadia? It has...

Duration:00:56:04

Artists and climate action; US National Gallery of Art’s women artists fund; Paula Modersohn-Becker

11/11/2022
This week: as the UN’s climate emergency summit, Cop27, continues in Egypt, Ben Luke talks to Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent—and the author of our online column about art and climate change—about international art initiatives responding to the crisis. Kaywin Feldman, the director of the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, DC, tells us about the museum’s new $10m endowment fund for purchases of works by women artists. The historic gift, from the...

Duration:00:52:32

National Gallery building row; contemporary art in Lagos; Chagall’s Falling Angel

11/4/2022
This week: uproar over the National Gallery in London’s building plans—is it a sensitive makeover or like “an airport lounge”? We talk to the director of the National Gallery, Gabriele Finaldi, about the gallery’s controversial plans for changes to its Sainsbury Wing, and to Rowan Moore, architecture critic at the Observer, about his views on the designs by the architect Annabel Selldorf, and how they respond to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s original Post-Modern building. Tokini...

Duration:01:08:27

Edward Hopper controversy; The Horror Show in London; a masterpiece in Bruges

10/28/2022
This week: the recent opening of Edward Hopper’s New York at the Whitney Museum has reignited a controversy over the provenance of some of his works. We talk to the leading Hopper scholar Gail Levin about the story of Arthayer R. Sanborn, a Baptist Minister who befriended the Hopper family and eventually amassed a vast collection of memorabilia and art, some of which is in the Whitney Museum’s exhibition. In London, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard tell us about The Horror Show!, their...

Duration:01:01:50

Art attack: Just Stop Oil and iconoclasm; Art Basel’s Paris+ fair; Frank Bowling

10/21/2022
This week: we talk to Emma Brown of Just Stop Oil about why the group targeted Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in the National Gallery, London, for its climate emergency protest. Stacy Boldrick, assistant professor of museum studies at the University of Leicester, discusses the climate protests in the context of the long history of iconoclasm and attacks on works of art. The first version of Paris+, Art Basel’s fair in the French capital, opened this week, and we ask Melanie Gerlis, a...

Duration:01:06:00

Art boom as the UK busts; Cecilia Vicuña; C20th women at Frieze; Modigliani in Philadelphia

10/14/2022
This week: Ben Luke talks to Anny Shaw, a contributing editor at The Art Newspaper, about the atmosphere at the Frieze London and Frieze Masters fairs amid the UK’s economic struggles and the strong US dollar. They also discuss the booming market for so-called “ultra-contemporary” art, and a shift in the artists being bought by collectors. We then talk to Cecilia Vicuña, the Chilean artist and poet who, this year alone, has won the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale, had a major exhibition...

Duration:01:14:29

Multimillion Old Master upgrades; Monet and Joan Mitchell; Tudors in New York

10/7/2022
This week: Georgina Adam joins Ben Luke to discuss the intriguing story of the bankrupt entrepreneur and art collector, the museum scholar and a host of Old Master paintings given new attributions. We talk to Suzanne Pagé, the curator of Monet-Mitchell, an exhibition bringing together the Impressionist Claude Monet and the post-war American abstract painter Joan Mitchell, at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris. And this episode’s Work of the Week is a 1583 painting of Elizabeth I of...

Duration:01:00:52

Lucian Freud special: new perspectives, the artist’s letters and a horse painting

9/30/2022
As a host of new exhibitions of the work of Lucian Freud opens across London to mark his centenary, this episode is all about this leading figure in post-war British painting. Ben Luke takes a tour of the major show at the National Gallery, which promises new perspectives on his work, with its curator, Daniel Herrmann. Martin Gayford discusses Freud’s little-explored letters, gathered in Love Lucian, a new book that Gayford has co-edited with Freud’s former assistant David Dawson. And this...

Duration:01:06:03

Italy’s far right weaponises culture; Carnegie International; Maria Bartuszová

9/23/2022
Amid growing support for hard-right parties in Europe, Ben Luke speaks to James Imam, The Art Newspaper’s Italian correspondent, about the far-right party Brothers of Italy, whose leader Georgia Meloni looks set to win power in the general election on 25 September. The party has given culture unusual prominence in its election campaign. The longest-running contemporary art exhibition in the US, the Carnegie International, opens this weekend in Pittsburgh, and Ben talks to its curator, Sohrab...

Duration:00:52:52

Art and the British Royal Family; museums’ energy crisis; Fuseli’s The Nightmare

9/16/2022
Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II and the proclamation of King Charles III, Ben Luke speaks to the former Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures, Desmond Shawe-Taylor. They discuss the Royal Collection, the late Queen’s taste in art, the new King’s commitment to art education, and how the modern era compares to the past in terms of Royal patronage of visual art. As lights in museums and on monuments are turned off across Europe, UK institutions are facing soaring energy bills that could...

Duration:00:54:04

Art and censorship; Diane Arbus; Guggenheim Bilbao at 25

9/9/2022
This week: is art censorship on the rise? The Art Newspaper’s chief contributing editor, Gareth Harris, joins Ben Luke to discuss his new book, Censored Art Today. We look at the different ways in which freedom of expression is being curbed across the globe and at the debates around contested history and cancel culture. This episode’s Work of the Week is Diane Arbus’s Puerto Rican woman with a beauty mark, N.Y.C., 1965, one of the 90 images that feature in Diane Arbus: Photographs,...

Duration:01:07:48

Brazil turns 200; a £50m Reynolds painting; Michael Heizer’s City

9/2/2022
Ben Luke talks to Alexander Kellner, the director of the National Museum of Brazil, about how he plans to mark Brazil’s bicentennial and to restore the museum in the wake of the devastating 2018 fire, which destroyed most of the building and millions of objects. The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent Martin Bailey tells us about the National Portrait Gallery’s ambition to acquire the £50m Portrait of Omai (1776), arguably the greatest work by the 18th-century British artist Joshua...

Duration:00:54:00