Ideas Books-logo

Ideas Books

Books & Literature >

More Information

Location:

United States

Language:

English


Episodes

Steven J. Alvarez: Selling War - A Critical Look at the Military's PR Machine

5/19/2016
More
Today's conversation with retired US Army Major Steven J. Alvarez focuses on Steve's ideas of how the U.S. military lost the information war in Iraq by engaging the wrong audiences—that is, the Western media—by ignoring Iraqi citizens and the wider Arab population, and by paying mere lip service to the directive to “Put an Iraqi face on everything.” That in the absence of effective communication from the U.S. military, the information void was swiftly filled by Al Qaeda and, eventually,...

Duration:00:28:10

Meg Leta Jones: Ctrl + Z - The Right To Be Forgotten

5/12/2016
More
Technology and Communications expert Meg Leta Jones discusses her new book, Ctrl + Z The Right to Be Forgotten which looks at the international debate around whether or not we should be allowed to remove embarrassing, harmful or no longer relevant things from the internet. Meg sits down with Craig to discuss whether children should be allowed to erase youthful indiscretions, if we should all just adjust to a world where everything is recorded, and the legalities and practicalities of...

Duration:00:27:32

Sean B Carroll: The Serengeti Rules - The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters

5/5/2016
More
Sean B. Carroll is an award-winning scientist, writer, educator, and executive producer. He is vice president for science education at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Allan Wilson Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His books include Endless Forms Most Beautiful, Brave Genius, and Remarkable Creatures, which was a finalist for the National Book Award for nonfiction. He lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Biologist Sean B Carroll...

Will Atkinson: Class

12/17/2015
More
Class is not only amongst the oldest and most controversial of all concepts in social science, but a topic which has fascinated, amused, incensed and galvanized the general public, too. But what exactly is a ‘class’? How do sociologists study and measure it, and how does it correspond to everyday understandings of social difference? Is it now dead or dying in today’s globalized and media-saturated world, or is it entering a new phase of significance on the world stage? In this book, Will...

Duration:00:30:36

Ernest Naylor: Moonstruck, How Lunar Cycles Affect Life

12/10/2015
More
Throughout history, the influence of the full Moon on humans and animals has featured in folklore and myths. Yet it has become increasingly apparent that many organisms really are influenced indirectly, and in some cases directly, by the lunar cycle. In Moonstruck, Ernest Naylor dismisses the myths concerning the influence of the Moon, but shows through a range of fascinating examples the remarkable real effects that we are now finding through science. He suggests that since the advent of...

Duration:00:27:43

Jeremy Taylor: Body by Darwin, How Evolution Shapes Our Health and Transforms Medicine

11/19/2015
More
Jeremy Taylor argues in Body by Darwin, that we can trace the roots of many medical conditions through our evolutionary history, revealing what has made us susceptible to certain illnesses and ailments over time and how we can use that knowledge to help us treat or prevent problems in the future. He examines the evolutionary origins of some of our most common and serious health issues. To begin, he looks at the hygiene hypothesis, which argues that our obsession with anti-bacterial...

Duration:00:33:45

Julian Assange: The Wikileaks Files, The World According to US Empire

11/12/2015
More
An interview with WikiLeaks cofounder Julian Assange. Wikileaks came to prominence in 2010 with the release of 251,287 top-secret State Department cables, which revealed to the world what the US government really thinks about national leaders, friendly dictators, and supposed allies. It brought to the surface the dark truths of crimes committed in our name: human rights violations, covert operations, and cover-ups. The WikiLeaks Files presents expert analysis on the most important cables...

Duration:00:29:25

Jamie Holmes: Nonsense, The Power of Not Knowing

11/5/2015
More
A look at the surprising upside of ambiguity—and how, properly harnessed, it can inspire learning, creativity, even empathy. Managing ambiguity—in our jobs, our relationships, and daily lives—is quickly becoming an essential skill. Yet most of us don’t know where to begin. As Jamie Holmes shows in Nonsense, being confused is unpleasant, so we tend to shutter our minds as we grasp for meaning and stability, especially in stressful circumstances. We’re hard-wired to resolve contradictions...

Duration:00:28:30

Joanne Entwistle: The Fashioned Body, Fashion, Dress and Modern Social Theory

10/29/2015
More
The Fashioned Body provides a wide-ranging and original overview of fashion and dress from an historical and sociological perspective. Where once fashion was seen as marginal, it has now entered into core economic discourse focused around ideas about ‘cultural’ and ‘creative’ work as a major driver of developed economies. This book gives a summary of the theories surrounding the role and function of fashion in modern society. By addressing the complex and interwoven amalgam of production,...

Duration:00:28:30

Jedediah Purdy: After Nature, A Politics for the Anthropocene

10/22/2015
More
Nature no longer exists apart from humanity. Henceforth, the world we will inhabit is the one we have made. Geologists have called this new planetary epoch the Anthropocene, the Age of Humans. The geological strata we are now creating record industrial emissions, industrial-scale crop pollens, and the disappearance of species driven to extinction. Climate change is planetary engineering without design. These facts of the Anthropocene are scientific, but its shape and meaning are questions...

Duration:00:28:30

Kevin Carey: The End of College

10/15/2015
More
From a renowned education writer comes a paradigm-shifting examination of the rapidly changing world of college that every parent, student, educator, and investor needs to understand. Over the span of just nine months in 2011 and 2012, the world’s most famous universities and high-powered technology entrepreneurs began a race to revolutionize higher education. College courses that had been kept for centuries from all but an elite few were released to millions of students throughout the...

Duration:00:21:29

Episode 10: John Fialka, Car Wars

10/8/2015
More
The resurgence of the electric car in modern life is a tale of adventurers, men and women who bucked the complete dominance of the fossil fuelled car to seek something cleaner, simpler and cheaper. Award-winning former Wall Street Journal reporter John Fialka documents the early days of the electric car, from the M.I.T./Caltech race between prototypes in the summer of 1968 to the 1987 victory of the Sunraycer in the world's first race featuring solar powered cars. Thirty years later, the...

Duration:00:24:15

Episode 9: Alvin Roth, Who Gets What and Why

10/1/2015
More
Nobel Prize winner Alvin E Roth reveals the often surprising rules that govern a vast array of activities—both mundane and life-changing—in which money may play little or no role. If you’ve ever sought a job or hired someone, applied to college or guided your child into a good kindergarten, asked someone out on a date or been asked out, you’ve participated in a kind of market. Most of the study of economics deals with commodity markets, where the price of a good connects sellers and buyers....

Duration:00:25:14

Episode 8: Enrique Martinez Celaya, On Art and Mindfulness

9/24/2015
More
In, On Art and Mindfulness, world-renowned artist and teacher Enrique Martínez Celaya shares his views and advice on the art-making process, the development of a practice, the management of obstacles, and the day-to-day choices we must make in order to remain creative and honest. Drawn from the sold-out workshops that Martínez Celaya taught over nine years at the venerable Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colorado, these concise teachings are relevant not only to artists but to anyone...

Duration:00:23:32

Episode 7: Daniel Bell, The China Model

9/17/2015
More
Westerners tend to divide the political world into "good" democracies and "bad" authoritarian regimes. But the Chinese political model does not fit neatly in either category. Over the past three decades, China has evolved a political system that can best be described as "political meritocracy." The China Model, seeks to understand the ideals and the reality of this unique political system. How do the ideals of political meritocracy set the standard for evaluating political progress (and...

Duration:00:23:11

Episode 6: Donald Prothero, The Story of Life in 25 Fossils

9/10/2015
More
The twenty-five fossils portrayed in this book catch animals in their evolutionary splendor as they transition from one kind of organism to another. We witness extinct plants and animals of microscopic and immense size and thrilling diversity. We learn about fantastic land and sea creatures that have no match in nature today. Along the way, we encounter such fascinating fossils as the earliest trilobite, Olenellus; the giant shark Carcharocles; enormous marine reptiles and the biggest...

Duration:00:27:17

Episode 5: Mary Looman, A country Called Prison

9/3/2015
More
The United States is the world leader in incarcerating citizens. 707 people out of every 100,000 are imprisoned. If those currently incarcerated in the US prison system were a country, it would be the 102nd most populated nation in the world. Aside from looking at the numbers, if we could look at prison from a new viewpoint, as its own country rather than an institution made up of walls and wires, policies and procedures, and legal statutes, what might we be able to learn? In A Country...

Duration:00:24:33

Episode 4: Jerry Kaplan, Humans Need Not Apply

8/27/2015
More
After billions of dollars and fifty years of effort, researchers are finally cracking the code on artificial intelligence. As society stands on the cusp of unprecedented change, Jerry Kaplan unpacks the latest advances in robotics, machine learning, and perception powering systems that rival or exceed human capabilities. Driverless cars, robotic helpers, and intelligent agents that promote our interests have the potential to usher in a new age of affluence and leisure — but as Kaplan warns,...

Duration:00:22:20

Episode 3: Michael Corballis, The Wandering Mind

8/20/2015
More
Based on the ideas in Michael Corballis' book, you probably won't read to the end of this description. Somewhere in the middle of the next paragraph, your mind will wander off. Minds wander. That’s just how it is. Does the fact that as much as fifty percent of our waking hours find us failing to focus on the task at hand represent a problem? The Wandering Mind draws on the latest research from cognitive science and evolutionary biology, Corballis shows us how mind-wandering not only frees...

Duration:00:20:15

Episode 2: Beth Shapiro, How To Clone A Mammoth

8/13/2015
More
Could extinct species like mammoths or the dodo be brought back to life? Author Beth Shapiro explores the cutting edge science that is being used – today – to resurrect the past. Beth considers de-extinction's practical benefits and ethical challenges. What are the costs and risks? What is the ultimate goal? How to Clone a Mammoth looks at the very real and compelling science behind what was once thought of as science fiction. Beth Shapiro is professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at...

Duration:00:21:48