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Economics Detective Radio

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Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.

Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.
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Location:

Canada

Description:

Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.

Language:

English


Episodes

Re-thinking the so-called Housing Bubble with Kevin Erdmann

3/17/2019
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Kevin Erdmann of the Mercatus Center returns to the podcast to discuss his new book, Shut Out: How a Housing Shortage Caused the Great Recession and Crippled Our Economy. From the publisher's website: Shut Out Links: My previous interview with Kevin, from 2017 Kevin's policy brief for Mercatus, arguing that housing was undersupplied during the so-called "housing bubble" Kevin's blog, Idiosyncratic Whisk

Duration:00:58:20

Kidnapping for Ransom with Anja Shortland

2/17/2019
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Today's guest on Economics Detective Radio is Anja Shortland of King's College London, discussing her new book Kidnap: Inside the Ransom Business, where she brings an economist's perspective to the shady world of the kidnapping for ransom business and to the professionals who specialize in getting hostages home safely. The book's description reads as follows: Kidnap: Inside the Ransom Business

Duration:00:47:43

The Skyscraper Curse and Business Cycles with Mark Thornton

2/8/2019
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Mark Thornton returns to the podcast to discuss his new book The Skyscraper Curse (available digitally for free). The book discusses the connection between record-setting skyscrapers and economic recessions. Here's an excerpt from the book's introduction: Mark relates these skyscrapers to the Austrian Business Cycle Theory (ABCT). He shows how record-setting skyscrapers and recessions can be caused by a common factor: excessively cheap credit. We discuss this theory in the interview.

Duration:00:40:05

Military History and the Remplacement Militaire with Louis Rouanet

1/27/2019
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Today's guest is Louis Rouanet from George Mason University. Our discussion focuses on an economic history paper he co-authored with Ennio Piano (a previous guest of the show), "Filling the Ranks: The Remplacement Militaire in Post-Revolutionary France."

Duration:00:41:47

Classical Economics and the New Poor Law with Gregory Clark

1/18/2019
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Today's guest is economic historian Gregory Clark, and our topic is England's New Poor Law of 1834. Gregory and his co-author, Marianne E. Page, wrote a paper on the topic entitled "Welfare reform, 1834: Did the New Poor Law in England produce significant economic gains?" Spoiler alert: It didn't. bête noirePoor Law Amendment Act

Duration:00:54:18

Institutional Cryptoeconomics with Mikayla Novak

1/12/2019
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Today's guest is Mikayla Novak (Twitter, SSRN) of the RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub at RMIT University. Her work focuses on some innovative new and potential uses for blockchain technology. As we all know at this point, the first use of blockchain technology was to create decentralized digital currencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum. But a blockchain is a much more general technology than this: it is a decentralized ledger that is resistant to tampering by any one individual. As such, it is a...

Duration:00:58:28

The Revolt of the Public with Martin Gurri

1/5/2019
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Today's guest is Martin Gurri (Twitter, blog), author of The Revolt of the Public. We discuss his book, which deals with the impact of information technology on political trends and populism.

Duration:00:51:23

Rent Control and the Housing Debate with Ash Navabi

12/22/2018
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Today on the podcast, Ash Navabi returns to discuss his recent work on housing and rent control. Ash published an opinion piece entitled "Why low-income earners should actually welcome Ontario's reversal on rent control." In that article, Ash pushes back on the kneejerk reaction to the Ontario government's reversal of its rent control policy on new units: We discuss the policy change that prompted the article, and the backlash the article itself generated, as well as many things related...

Duration:01:11:02

The Minimum Wage and Labour Market Dynamics with Jonathan Meer

12/14/2018
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Today's guest is Jonathan Meer of Texas A&M. We discuss his work on the minimum wage.

Duration:00:53:50

Seigniorage in the Civil War South with Bryan Cutsinger

12/7/2018
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Today's guest is Bryan Cutsinger of George Mason University, discussing his paper, "Seigniorage in the Civil War South."

Duration:01:02:13

Climate Change, Carbon Taxes, and Geo-Engineering with Bob Murphy

11/9/2018
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Today's guest is Bob Murphy of Texas Tech University. We discuss his work on climate change and the social cost of carbon. Bob started working on issues related to climate change when he started working with the Institute for Energy Research. We discuss the implications of the Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) used to evaluate the impact of climate change, the pivotal role played by discount rates in evaluating any kind of climate policy, the pitfalls of carbon taxation, and the...

Duration:00:56:43

Experimental Economics and the Importance of Instructions

9/30/2018
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Today I discuss one of my own papers: "Instructions" by Freeman, Kimbrough, Petersen, and Tong. This research project on experimental instructions has been ongoing for years, but it was recently conditionally accepted for publication. I tell the story of how the research came together and detail some of the results.

Duration:00:34:35

Individual Choice and Social Welfare with Viktor Vanberg

9/21/2018
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Today's guest is Viktor Vanberg of the Walter Eucken Institute. We discuss a recent working paper of his entitled Individual Choice and Social Welfare: Theoretical Foundations of Political Economy. We discuss welfare economics, what it means for economics to be an applied science, and the work of the late James Buchanan.

Duration:00:52:49

Why Hayek Matters with Pete Boettke

9/1/2018
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Today's guest is Peter Boettke of George Mason University and we're discussing his recent book in the Great Thinkers in Economics series: F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy. Note for those interested in buying the book: IF you are at a university and your university library has the Springer subscription (which most do), you can order a print-on-demand version---MyCopy---for $25, so that makes it somewhat more reasonable than the library prices. You can also...

Duration:01:05:52

The Empirical Case for School Choice with Corey A. DeAngelis

8/20/2018
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Corey A. DeAngelis of the Cato Institute joins the podcast to discuss his review of the school choice research. We discuss this paper in addition to a recent blog post Corey wrote entitled "We Shouldn’t Need to Use Science to Grant Educational Freedom." Corey argues that we should have a strong presumption in favour of letting families choose where their kids go to school. In the academic debate on school choice, people adopt an implicit balance of evidence standard for supporting or...

Duration:00:58:46

Compensating Blood and Organ Donors with Mario Macis

8/13/2018
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My guest today, Mario Macis of Johns Hopkins University, has done a number of interesting studies related to blood and organ donation, particularly the compensation of blood and organ donors. For instance, Mario and his coauthor, Nicola Lacetera, observed the effect of an incentive system that offered symbolic rewards to blood donors in a particular Italian town. They found that when prizes for frequent donation were publicly announced, people donated more blood, indicating that social image...

Duration:00:50:42

Why No Ancient Greek Industrial Revolution? A Conversation with George Tridimas

8/3/2018
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Here on Economics Detective Radio, we've had many discussions about the early modern period, and the circumstances that gave rise to the modern levels of sustained economic growth that were heretofore unheard of in human history. One important question is, what was it about England and the Low Countries in the early modern period that made them the first to transition to modern-style economies? A related, and equally important question is why other times and places throughout history failed...

Duration:00:56:10

Artificial Intelligence, Risk, and Alignment with Roman Yampolskiy

7/20/2018
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My guest today is Roman Yampolskiy, computer scientist and AI safety researcher. He is the author of multiple books, including Artificial Superintelligence: A Futuristic Approach. He is also the editor of the forthcoming volume Artificial Intelligence Safety and Security, featuring contributions from many leading AI safety researchers. We discuss the nature of AI risk, the state of the current research on the topic, and some of the more and less promising lines of research.

Duration:00:54:28

How Economics Shapes Gender Norms with Melanie Meng Xue

7/9/2018
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Could cultural attitudes about gender reflect economic conditions hundreds of years ago? My guest today says they do! Melanie Meng Xue of Northwestern University has shown that China's cotton revolution had far-reaching consequences extending even to the modern day:

Duration:00:59:24

All Roads Lead to Toll Roads: Robert Poole on America's Highways

7/1/2018
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Today's episode of Economics Detective Radio features a conversation with Robert Poole of the Reason Foundation. Robert is the author of Rethinking America's Highways: A 21st-Century Vision for Better Infrastructure, a book on how to fix America's infrastructure woes by changing the way roadways are funded: We discuss this book, as well as Robert's recent controversial piece in Reason, "Stop Trying to Get Workers Out of Their Cars." I challenge him on the issue of upzoning and we discuss...

Duration:00:51:00