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Economics Detective Radio

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Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.

Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.
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Location:

Canada

Description:

Economics Detective Radio is a weekly podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews, and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, Austrian economics, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the science of human action. For additional content and links related to each episode, visit economicsdetective.com.

Language:

English


Episodes

Cities, Markets, and Urban Planning with Alain Bertaud

8/22/2019
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Today's guest is Alain Bertaud, author of Order Without Design: How Markets Shape Cities. Alain discusses his extensive experience in urban planning: When he was first trained as a planner, urban planning was thought of as an offshoot of architecture. In this conception, cities are just large buildings that need to be laid out and designed by a skilled architect. Through his experience, Alain came around to thinking of cities not as large buildings to be designed, but as markets. He argues...

Duration:00:57:52

Drinking Through the Unfree World with Ben Powell

7/27/2019
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Ben Powell joins the podcast today to discuss his new book, Socialism Sucks: Two Economists Drink Their Way Through the Unfree World, coauthored with Robert Lawson. The book is a combination of economic analysis and Anthony-Bourdain-style travel diary.

Duration:00:57:39

Political Change with Ed Lopez

7/18/2019
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Today's guest is Edward J. Lopez of Western Carolina University. We discuss his book, Madmen, Intellectuals, and Academic Scribblers: The Economic Engine of Political Change, which was co-authored with Wayne Leighton. Links In the course of the conversation, Ed mentions Thomas Hazlett's work on the radio spectrum and Tina Rosenberg's discussion of Iranian kidney markets on Econtalk.

Duration:01:05:05

Markets for Rebellion with Vincent Geloso

7/11/2019
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Vincent Geloso returns to the podcast today to discuss his paper, "Markets for Rebellions? The Rebellions of 1837-38 in Lower Canada". The paper discusses the idea that political upheaval and even violent rebellion can be more likely in areas with a high degree of market access.

Duration:00:57:33

Informal Order and the State in Afghanistan with Jennifer Murtazashvili

7/7/2019
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Tooday's guest is Jennifer Murtazashvili of the University of Pittsburgh. We discuss her book, Informal Order and the State in Afghanistan. Our conversation dives deep into the modern history of Afghanistan, including its 1978 communist revolution and subsequent Soviet invasion.

Duration:00:55:27

Political Capitalism with Randall Holcombe

6/28/2019
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Today's guest is Randall Holcombe of Florida State University. Our discussion today focuses on his book, Political Capitalism: How Economic and Political Power Is Made and Maintained.

Duration:00:48:36

Free Trade and Prosperity with Arvind Panagariya

6/21/2019
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Today's guest is Arvind Panagariya of Columbia University. We discuss his book, Free Trade and Prosperity: How Openness Helps Developing Countries Grow Richer and Combat Poverty. Free Trade and Prosperity

Duration:00:59:29

Highway Expansions, Tolls, and Congestion with Robert Krol

6/9/2019
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Today's guest is Robert Krol of California State University. Our topic is a recent policy paper he wrote for The Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University entitled Can we Build our way out of Urban Traffic Congestion?

Duration:00:38:13

Elinor Ostrom, Polycentric Governance, and Policing with Vlad Tarko

5/12/2019
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Today's guest is Vlad Tarko of Dickinson College. We discuss the life and work of Elinor Ostrom, the 2009 winner of the Nobel Prize in economics. Vlad is the author of Elinor Ostrom: An intellectual biography. We discuss Elinor Ostrom's work on polycentric governance, the management of common-pool resources, and policing. We also discuss the continuing work scholars are doing in this research area, including Vlad's new book Public Governance and the Classical-Liberal Perspective: Political...

Duration:00:56:54

Challenging the State Lottery System with Matthew Curtis

4/14/2019
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My guest today is Matthew Curtis, founder of the startup Vice Lotteries. Vice Lotteries is a new startup that aims to challenge state governments' legal monopolies over lotteries. State lotteries are amazingly and bizarrely unethical. They drain billions of dollars out of communities, primarily poor ones. Lottery spending has increased substantially over the past decades, with the average lotto player spending $600 per year, and many spending significantly more than that. Vice Lotteries...

Duration:00:51:23

Why Students Switch Majors with Jamin Speer

4/4/2019
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Today's guest is Jamin Speer of the University of Memphis. We discuss his paper, "Are Changes of Major Major Changes? The Roles of Grades, Gender, and Preferences in College Major Switching" co-authored with Carmen Astorne-Figari. Links Jamin's Twitter thread about the paper Niederle and Vesterlund's paper on gender differences in competitiveness Neal's paper on job mobility featuring the following quote mentioned in the episode:

Duration:00:50:08

Re-thinking the so-called Housing Bubble with Kevin Erdmann

3/17/2019
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Kevin Erdmann of the Mercatus Center returns to the podcast to discuss his new book, Shut Out: How a Housing Shortage Caused the Great Recession and Crippled Our Economy. From the publisher's website: Shut Out Links: My previous interview with Kevin, from 2017 Kevin's policy brief for Mercatus, arguing that housing was undersupplied during the so-called "housing bubble" Kevin's blog, Idiosyncratic Whisk

Duration:00:58:20

Kidnapping for Ransom with Anja Shortland

2/17/2019
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Today's guest on Economics Detective Radio is Anja Shortland of King's College London, discussing her new book Kidnap: Inside the Ransom Business, where she brings an economist's perspective to the shady world of the kidnapping for ransom business and to the professionals who specialize in getting hostages home safely. The book's description reads as follows: Kidnap: Inside the Ransom Business

Duration:00:47:43

The Skyscraper Curse and Business Cycles with Mark Thornton

2/8/2019
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Mark Thornton returns to the podcast to discuss his new book The Skyscraper Curse (available digitally for free). The book discusses the connection between record-setting skyscrapers and economic recessions. Here's an excerpt from the book's introduction: Mark relates these skyscrapers to the Austrian Business Cycle Theory (ABCT). He shows how record-setting skyscrapers and recessions can be caused by a common factor: excessively cheap credit. We discuss this theory in the interview.

Duration:00:40:05

Military History and the Remplacement Militaire with Louis Rouanet

1/27/2019
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Today's guest is Louis Rouanet from George Mason University. Our discussion focuses on an economic history paper he co-authored with Ennio Piano (a previous guest of the show), "Filling the Ranks: The Remplacement Militaire in Post-Revolutionary France."

Duration:00:41:47

Classical Economics and the New Poor Law with Gregory Clark

1/18/2019
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Today's guest is economic historian Gregory Clark, and our topic is England's New Poor Law of 1834. Gregory and his co-author, Marianne E. Page, wrote a paper on the topic entitled "Welfare reform, 1834: Did the New Poor Law in England produce significant economic gains?" Spoiler alert: It didn't. bête noirePoor Law Amendment Act

Duration:00:54:18

Institutional Cryptoeconomics with Mikayla Novak

1/12/2019
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Today's guest is Mikayla Novak (Twitter, SSRN) of the RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub at RMIT University. Her work focuses on some innovative new and potential uses for blockchain technology. As we all know at this point, the first use of blockchain technology was to create decentralized digital currencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum. But a blockchain is a much more general technology than this: it is a decentralized ledger that is resistant to tampering by any one individual. As such, it is a...

Duration:00:58:28

The Revolt of the Public with Martin Gurri

1/5/2019
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Today's guest is Martin Gurri (Twitter, blog), author of The Revolt of the Public. We discuss his book, which deals with the impact of information technology on political trends and populism.

Duration:00:51:23

Rent Control and the Housing Debate with Ash Navabi

12/22/2018
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Today on the podcast, Ash Navabi returns to discuss his recent work on housing and rent control. Ash published an opinion piece entitled "Why low-income earners should actually welcome Ontario's reversal on rent control." In that article, Ash pushes back on the kneejerk reaction to the Ontario government's reversal of its rent control policy on new units: We discuss the policy change that prompted the article, and the backlash the article itself generated, as well as many things related...

Duration:01:11:02

The Minimum Wage and Labour Market Dynamics with Jonathan Meer

12/14/2018
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Today's guest is Jonathan Meer of Texas A&M. We discuss his work on the minimum wage.

Duration:00:53:50