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From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.

From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.
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Location:

New York, NY

Description:

From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.

Language:

English

Contact:

160 Varick St. New York, NY 10013


Episodes

360. Is the Protestant Work Ethic Real?

12/5/2018
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In the early 20th century, Max Weber argued that Protestantism created wealth. Finally, there are data to prove if he was right. All it took were some missionary experiments in the Philippines and a clever map-matching trick that goes back to 16th-century Germany.

Duration:00:42:19

359. Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s?

11/28/2018
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The quirky little grocery chain with California roots and German ownership has a lot to teach all of us about choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and team spirit.

Duration:00:49:10

There’s a War on Sugar. Is It Justified? (Ep. 285 Rebroadcast)

11/21/2018
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Some people argue that sugar should be regulated, like alcohol and tobacco, on the grounds that it’s addictive and toxic. How much sense does that make? We hear from a regulatory advocate, an evidence-based skeptic, a former F.D.A. commissioner — and the organizers of Milktoberfest.

Duration:00:51:16

358. Yes, the Open Office Is Terrible — But It Doesn’t Have to Be

11/14/2018
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It began as a post-war dream for a more collaborative and egalitarian workplace. It has evolved into a nightmare of noise and discomfort. Can the open office be saved, or should we all just be working from home?

Duration:00:44:49

357. Can an Industrial Giant Become a Tech Darling?

11/7/2018
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The Ford Motor Company is ditching its legacy sedans, doubling down on trucks, and trying to steer its stock price out of a long skid. But C.E.O. Jim Hackett has even bigger plans: to turn a century-old automaker into the nucleus of a “transportation operating system.” Is Hackett just whistling past the graveyard, or does he see what others can’t?

Duration:00:56:23

356. America’s Hidden Duopoly

10/31/2018
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We all know our political system is “broken” — but what if that’s not true? Some say the Republicans and Democrats constitute a wildly successful industry that has colluded to kill off competition, stifle reform, and drive the country apart. So what are you going to do about it?

Duration:00:56:00

Extra: Elvis Costello Full Interview

10/27/2018
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A conversation with the iconic singer-songwriter, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “How to Be Creative.”

Duration:01:20:01

355. Where Does Creativity Come From (and Why Do Schools Kill It Off)?

10/24/2018
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Family environments and “diversifying experiences” (including the early death of a parent); intrinsic versus extrinsic motivations; schools that value assessments, but don't assess the things we value. All these elements factor into the long, mysterious march towards a creative life. To learn more, we examine the early years of Ai Weiwei, Rosanne Cash, Elvis Costello, Maira Kalman, Wynton Marsalis, Jennifer Egan, and others. (Ep. 2 of the “How to Be Creative” series.)

Duration:01:16:50

Extra: Jeremy Lin Full Interview

10/20/2018
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A conversation with veteran NBA point guard Jeremy Lin, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Hidden Side of Sports.”

Duration:00:44:17

354. How to Be Creative

10/17/2018
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There are thousands of books on the subject, but what do we actually know about creativity? In this new series, we talk to the researchers who study it as well as artists, inventors, and pathbreakers who live it every day: Ai Weiwei, James Dyson, Elvis Costello, Jennifer Egan, Rosanne Cash, Wynton Marsalis, Maira Kalman, and more. (Ep. 1 of the “How to Be Creative” series.)

Duration:00:54:44

353. How to Optimize Your Apology

10/10/2018
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You said, “I’m sorry,” but somehow you haven’t been forgiven. Why? Because you’re doing it wrong! A report from the front lines of apology science.

Duration:00:51:48

352. Can This Man Stop a Trade War?

10/3/2018
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The World Trade Organization is the referee for 164 trading partners, each with their own political and economic agendas. Lately, those agendas have gotten more complicated — especially with President Trump’s tariff blitz. Roberto Azevêdo, head of the W.T.O., tells us why it’s so hard to balance protectionism and globalism; what’s really behind the loss of jobs; and what he’d say to Trump (if he ever gets the chance).

Duration:00:45:08

Extra: Shawn Johnson Full Interview

9/30/2018
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A conversation with 2008 Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Hidden Side of Sports.”

Duration:01:08:17

351. Here’s Why You’re Not an Elite Athlete

9/26/2018
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There are a lot of factors that go into greatness, many of which are not obvious. A variety of Olympic and professional athletes tell us how they made it and what they sacrificed to get there. And if you can identify the sport most likely to get a kid into a top college — well then, touché! (Ep. 3 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)

Duration:01:10:01

Extra: Full Interviews With Jimmy Garoppolo, Joe Staley, Mike McGlinchey, and Kyle Juszczyk

9/23/2018
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Stephen Dubner’s conversations with members of the San Francisco 49ers offense, recorded for Freakonomics Radio episode No. 350, part of the “Hidden Side of Sports” series.

Duration:01:20:41

350. How to Stop Being a Loser

9/19/2018
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The San Francisco 49ers, one of the most valuable sports franchises in the world, also used to be one of the best. But they’ve been losing lately — a lot — and one of their players launched a controversy by taking a knee during the national anthem. So why is everyone there so optimistic? To find out, we speak with the team’s owner, head coach, general manager, and star players, including their new $137.5 million quarterback. (Ep. 2 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)

Duration:01:04:28

349. How Sports Became Us

9/12/2018
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Dollar-wise, the sports industry is surprisingly small, about the same size as the cardboard-box industry. So why does it make so much noise? Because it reflects — and often amplifies — just about every political, economic, and social issue of the day. Introducing a new series, “The Hidden Side of Sports.”

Duration:00:55:09

Pick of the Week: Is America Ready for a “No-Lose Lottery”? (Ep. 309)

9/12/2018
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From the archive — Most people don't enjoy the simple, boring act of putting money in a savings account. But we do love to play the lottery. So what if you combine the two, creating a new kind of savings account with a lottery payout?

Duration:00:48:51

Pick of the Week: How to Get More Grit in Your Life (Ep. 246)

9/12/2018
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From the archive — The psychologist Angela Duckworth argues that a person's level of stick-to-itiveness is directly related to their level of success. No big surprise there. But grit, she says, isn't something you're born with — it can be learned. Here's how.

Duration:00:45:44

348. Is the Government More Entrepreneurial Than You Think?

9/5/2018
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We all know the standard story: our economy would be more dynamic if only the government would get out of the way. The economist Mariana Mazzucato says we’ve got that story backward. She argues that the government, by funding so much early-stage research, is hugely responsible for big successes in tech, pharma, energy, and more. But the government also does a terrible job in claiming credit — and, more important, getting a return on its investment.

Duration:00:36:04