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From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.

From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.
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Location:

New York, NY

Description:

From the co-author of the best-selling Freakonomics titles, comes Freakonomics Radio, a fascinating and often surprising look at the hidden side of, well...everything. Each week Stephen J. Dubner explores the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head.

Language:

English

Contact:

160 Varick St. New York, NY 10013


Episodes

354. How to Be Creative

10/17/2018
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There are thousands of books on the subject, but what do we actually know about creativity? In this new series, we talk to the researchers who study it as well as artists, inventors, and pathbreakers who live it every day: Ai Weiwei, James Dyson, Elvis Costello, Jennifer Egan, Rosanne Cash, Wynton Marsalis, Maira Kalman, and more. (Ep. 1 of the “How to Be Creative” series.)

Duration:00:54:44

353. How to Optimize Your Apology

10/10/2018
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You said, “I’m sorry,” but somehow you haven’t been forgiven. Why? Because you’re doing it wrong! A report from the front lines of apology science.

Duration:00:51:48

352. Can This Man Stop a Trade War?

10/3/2018
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The World Trade Organization is the referee for 164 trading partners, each with their own political and economic agendas. Lately, those agendas have gotten more complicated — especially with President Trump’s tariff blitz. Roberto Azevêdo, head of the W.T.O., tells us why it’s so hard to balance protectionism and globalism; what’s really behind the loss of jobs; and what he’d say to Trump (if he ever gets the chance).

Duration:00:45:08

Extra: Shawn Johnson Full Interview

9/30/2018
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A conversation with 2008 Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Hidden Side of Sports.”

Duration:01:08:17

351. Here’s Why You’re Not an Elite Athlete

9/26/2018
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There are a lot of factors that go into greatness, many of which are not obvious. A variety of Olympic and professional athletes tell us how they made it and what they sacrificed to get there. And if you can identify the sport most likely to get a kid into a top college — well then, touché! (Ep. 3 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)

Duration:01:10:01

Extra: Full Interviews With Jimmy Garoppolo, Joe Staley, Mike McGlinchey, and Kyle Juszczyk

9/23/2018
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Stephen Dubner’s conversations with members of the San Francisco 49ers offense, recorded for Freakonomics Radio episode No. 350, part of the “Hidden Side of Sports” series.

Duration:01:20:41

350. How to Stop Being a Loser

9/19/2018
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The San Francisco 49ers, one of the most valuable sports franchises in the world, also used to be one of the best. But they’ve been losing lately — a lot — and one of their players launched a controversy by taking a knee during the national anthem. So why is everyone there so optimistic? To find out, we speak with the team’s owner, head coach, general manager, and star players, including their new $137.5 million quarterback. (Ep. 2 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)

Duration:01:04:28

349. How Sports Became Us

9/12/2018
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Dollar-wise, the sports industry is surprisingly small, about the same size as the cardboard-box industry. So why does it make so much noise? Because it reflects — and often amplifies — just about every political, economic, and social issue of the day. Introducing a new series, “The Hidden Side of Sports.”

Duration:00:55:09

348. Is the Government More Entrepreneurial Than You Think?

9/5/2018
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We all know the standard story: our economy would be more dynamic if only the government would get out of the way. The economist Mariana Mazzucato says we’ve got that story backward. She argues that the government, by funding so much early-stage research, is hugely responsible for big successes in tech, pharma, energy, and more. But the government also does a terrible job in claiming credit — and, more important, getting a return on its investment.

Duration:00:36:04

347. Why You Shouldn’t Open a Restaurant

8/29/2018
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Kenji Lopez-Alt became a rock star of the food world by bringing science into the kitchen in a way that everyday cooks can appreciate. Then he dared to start his own restaurant — and discovered problems that even science can’t solve.

Duration:00:39:30

346. Two (Totally Opposite) Ways to Save the Planet

8/22/2018
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The environmentalists say we’re doomed if we don’t drastically reduce consumption. The technologists say that human ingenuity can solve just about any problem. A debate that’s been around for decades has become a shouting match. Is anyone right?

Duration:00:53:43

345. How to Be Happy

8/15/2018
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The U.N.’s World Happiness Report — created to curtail our unhealthy obsession with G.D.P. — is dominated every year by the Nordic countries. We head to Denmark to learn the secrets of this happiness epidemic (and to see if we should steal them).

Duration:00:39:43

344. Who Decides How Much a Life Is Worth?

8/8/2018
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After every mass shooting or terrorist attack, victims and survivors receive a huge outpouring of support — including a massive pool of compensation money. How should that money be allocated? We speak with the man who’s done that job after many tragedies, including 9/11. The hard part, it turns out, isn’t attaching a dollar figure to each victim; the hard part is acknowledging that dollars can’t heal the pain.

Duration:00:40:33

Pick of the Week: Trevor Noah Has a Lot to Say (Ep. 272)

8/7/2018
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From the archive — The Daily Show host grew up as a poor, mixed-race South African kid going to three churches every Sunday. So he has a sui generis view of America — especially on race, politics, and religion — and he's not afraid to speak his mind.

Duration:00:38:19

Pick of the Week: Failure Is Your Friend (Ep. 169)

8/7/2018
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From the archive — In which we argue that failure should not only be tolerated but celebrated.

Duration:00:34:00

Pick of the Week: That’s a Great Question! (Ep. 192)

8/1/2018
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From the archive — Verbal tic or strategic rejoinder? Whatever the case: it’s rare to come across an interview these days where at least one question isn’t a “great” one.

Duration:00:28:49

343. An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar…

8/1/2018
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In this live episode of “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know,” we learn why New York has skinny skyscrapers, how to weaponize water, and what astronauts talk about in space. Joining Stephen J. Dubner as co-host is the linguist John McWhorter; Bari Weiss (The New York Times) is the real-time fact-checker.

Duration:00:55:50

Pick of the Week: What Do Medieval Nuns and Bo Jackson Have in Common? (Ep. 126)

8/1/2018
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From the archive — A look at whether spite pays — and if it even exists.

Duration:00:41:20

342. Has Lance Armstrong Finally Come Clean?

7/25/2018
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He was once the most lionized athlete on the planet, with seven straight Tour de France wins and a victory over cancer too. Then the doping charges caught up with him. When he finally confessed to Oprah, he admits, “it didn’t go well at all.” That’s because he wasn’t actually contrite yet. Now, five years later, he says he is. Do you believe him?

Duration:00:52:50

Pick of the Week: Not Your Grandmother’s I.M.F. (Ep. 312)

7/24/2018
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From the archive — The International Monetary Fund has long been the "lender of last resort" for economies in crisis. Christine Lagarde, who runs the institution, would like to prevent those crises from ever happening. She tells us her plans.

Duration:00:40:06