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The Correll Files

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Jim Correll just may have figured out the biggest secret to business success, and it didn’t require an advanced business degree to do it. Instead, it’s been a matter of following his instincts, sponging up knowledge from thought leaders, making mistakes and pursuing passions in a wildly diverse 25-year career working in small business, manufacturing, entrepreneurial ventures and post-secondary education. What has he learned? When your mind is open to possibility rather than paralyzed by pessimism, amazing things can happen. Now, many of the lessons learned of the last 25-years are captured in “The Correll Files,” a diverse collection of stories related to business, entrepreneurship, empathetic design, self-efficacy, maker space, Fab Lab and inspiration. Many of the stories are presented in the form of the “Entrepreneurial Minute”, a radio program that aired on a regional station for a period a few years ago. The shorter, “Minute” programs are combined with interviews with many of the interesting entrepreneurs and thought leaders Jim has come to know over the years. In his work as a business coach, entrepreneur mentor and the director of Fab Lab ICC at Independence (KS) Community College, Jim teaches aspiring entrepreneurs to challenge the archaic models of conventional business thinking and education and explore new paths for solving the world’s problems through innovation, creativity, trial and error. A former professional photographer, Jim encourages his proteges to first look at the world through a wide-angle lens, then focus their efforts where they believe they can make a difference and take the shot. “The environment may not be perfectly composed, you may not have just the right angle on your first try, and you certainly may feel over exposed when you put yourself out there and launch an idea,” he analogizes. “But so often, the raw, candid moments we capture are the most representative of real life, the ones that draw us in, take our breath away and haunt our memory.” Such are the lessons of entrepreneurship, says Jim. There’s no script, precise formula or lesson plan. Success requires a willingness to try something unconventional and to redefine failure as learning. It’s all about the mindset, and anyone can achieve it. In “The Correll Files,” Jim shares his goal to build a growing circle of “entrepreneurial thinkers" with a limitless ripple effect. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the author and/or guests and do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of Fab Lab ICC or Independence Community College.

Jim Correll just may have figured out the biggest secret to business success, and it didn’t require an advanced business degree to do it. Instead, it’s been a matter of following his instincts, sponging up knowledge from thought leaders, making mistakes and pursuing passions in a wildly diverse 25-year career working in small business, manufacturing, entrepreneurial ventures and post-secondary education. What has he learned? When your mind is open to possibility rather than paralyzed by pessimism, amazing things can happen. Now, many of the lessons learned of the last 25-years are captured in “The Correll Files,” a diverse collection of stories related to business, entrepreneurship, empathetic design, self-efficacy, maker space, Fab Lab and inspiration. Many of the stories are presented in the form of the “Entrepreneurial Minute”, a radio program that aired on a regional station for a period a few years ago. The shorter, “Minute” programs are combined with interviews with many of the interesting entrepreneurs and thought leaders Jim has come to know over the years. In his work as a business coach, entrepreneur mentor and the director of Fab Lab ICC at Independence (KS) Community College, Jim teaches aspiring entrepreneurs to challenge the archaic models of conventional business thinking and education and explore new paths for solving the world’s problems through innovation, creativity, trial and error. A former professional photographer, Jim encourages his proteges to first look at the world through a wide-angle lens, then focus their efforts where they believe they can make a difference and take the shot. “The environment may not be perfectly composed, you may not have just the right angle on your first try, and you certainly may feel over exposed when you put yourself out there and launch an idea,” he analogizes. “But so often, the raw, candid moments we capture are the most representative of real life, the ones that draw us in, take our breath away and haunt our memory.” Such are the lessons of entrepreneurship, says Jim. There’s no script, precise formula or lesson plan. Success requires a willingness to try something unconventional and to redefine failure as learning. It’s all about the mindset, and anyone can achieve it. In “The Correll Files,” Jim shares his goal to build a growing circle of “entrepreneurial thinkers" with a limitless ripple effect. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the author and/or guests and do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of Fab Lab ICC or Independence Community College.
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United States

Description:

Jim Correll just may have figured out the biggest secret to business success, and it didn’t require an advanced business degree to do it. Instead, it’s been a matter of following his instincts, sponging up knowledge from thought leaders, making mistakes and pursuing passions in a wildly diverse 25-year career working in small business, manufacturing, entrepreneurial ventures and post-secondary education. What has he learned? When your mind is open to possibility rather than paralyzed by pessimism, amazing things can happen. Now, many of the lessons learned of the last 25-years are captured in “The Correll Files,” a diverse collection of stories related to business, entrepreneurship, empathetic design, self-efficacy, maker space, Fab Lab and inspiration. Many of the stories are presented in the form of the “Entrepreneurial Minute”, a radio program that aired on a regional station for a period a few years ago. The shorter, “Minute” programs are combined with interviews with many of the interesting entrepreneurs and thought leaders Jim has come to know over the years. In his work as a business coach, entrepreneur mentor and the director of Fab Lab ICC at Independence (KS) Community College, Jim teaches aspiring entrepreneurs to challenge the archaic models of conventional business thinking and education and explore new paths for solving the world’s problems through innovation, creativity, trial and error. A former professional photographer, Jim encourages his proteges to first look at the world through a wide-angle lens, then focus their efforts where they believe they can make a difference and take the shot. “The environment may not be perfectly composed, you may not have just the right angle on your first try, and you certainly may feel over exposed when you put yourself out there and launch an idea,” he analogizes. “But so often, the raw, candid moments we capture are the most representative of real life, the ones that draw us in, take our breath away and haunt our memory.” Such are the lessons of entrepreneurship, says Jim. There’s no script, precise formula or lesson plan. Success requires a willingness to try something unconventional and to redefine failure as learning. It’s all about the mindset, and anyone can achieve it. In “The Correll Files,” Jim shares his goal to build a growing circle of “entrepreneurial thinkers" with a limitless ripple effect. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the author and/or guests and do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of Fab Lab ICC or Independence Community College.

Language:

English


Episodes

Go Ahead-Count Those Chickens Before They Hatch

11/18/2019
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"Don't count your chickens before they hatch." I’ve heard that one all my life. Here’s what the Cambridge Dictionary has to say about this old adage; “you should not make plans that depend on something good happening before you know that it has actually happened” This is a terrible message for any of us, especially our youth, it implies that any good thing happening is a matter of some kind of chance or luck; that life is some kind of lottery where good things happen randomly only to the...

Duration:00:04:34

The Fallacy of the Market Study

8/25/2019
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I am reminded of a particular “Bonanza” episode every time one of our rural communities engages a consultant to do a market study, retail business recruitment, community branding or otherwise tell us what we can do and what retailers they can recruit to make our communities grow. The views and opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of Fab Lab ICC or Independence Community College.

Duration:00:05:11

Interview with Curtis Lavine

8/19/2019
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At an age most people would retire, Curtis Lavine recognized a need in the aviation industry and started Kansas Aviation with 4 employees at age 59 in 1992. In 2014, Kansas Aviation was named Kansas Exporter of the Year. In a 2013 interview with Brian Hight, Magnolia Scents by Design--for the Entrepreneurial Mindset class--Curtis reveals some of the thought concepts and mindset that drive him to this day including "My next idea comes from recognizing a need." Caricature by Steve McBride

Duration:00:17:46

More Robots Coming and They're Getting Smarter

8/12/2019
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The robots keep coming and they are getting smarter by the day. For our purposes today, we’ll use the term robots to represent the concepts of robotics, automation and artificial intelligence (AI). Robots hold a promise to make life better and safer for many people. Our systems of making products and services available to a much wider spectrum of the world’s population can be greatly enhanced at a lower cost. But there’s at least one aspect that, while not exactly being ignored, is going to...

Duration:00:30:44

Let's Play Ball After 12 Years of Study

7/25/2019
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Asking young people to study the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) subjects in school without making anything is like asking them to study sports for 12 years before actually playing.

Duration:00:06:04