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The Journal.

Wall Street Journal Radio

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Location:

United States

Description:

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Language:

English


Episodes

Biden's New FTC Chair Squares Off With Big Tech

7/30/2021
Even before her appointment, Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan had made a name for herself by criticizing Amazon's market dominance. Her stance has already provoked backlash from the tech industry and congressional Republicans. WSJ's Ryan Tracy explains.

Duration:00:14:54

Simone Biles and the Power of Saying No

7/29/2021
Earlier this week, star gymnast Simone Biles pulled out of two Olympic competitions after she experienced a dangerous case of the "twisties." WSJ's Louise Radnofsky explains how one of the Olympics's biggest stars is helping change attitudes towards mental health and physical safety.

Duration:00:17:39

Robinhood's Unconventional IPO

7/28/2021
Robinhood built its business around the idea of making it easier than ever for everyday people to invest. Now the company's betting it can "democratize" initial public offerings, too - including its own. WSJ's Peter Rudegeair explains the thinking behind Robinhood's unconventional IPO this week.

Duration:00:14:44

The Fed Chair Helped Save the Economy. Will He Keep His Job?

7/27/2021
Jerome Powell has led the U.S. economy through its pandemic-induced crash and turbulent recovery. But with his first term ending soon, WSJ's Nick Timiraos says some in Washington are questioning whether Powell should be reappointed.

Duration:00:16:38

Unrest, Covid and Economic Despair in South Africa

7/26/2021
Covid has taken a toll on South Africa. Successive lockdowns have led to deep economic suffering across the country. And when political protests broke out recently, the economic hardship took a violent turn leading to riots and looting. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how South Africa could be a warning to other countries.

Duration:00:14:30

Simone Biles Is USA Gymnastics' Biggest Star - And Critic

7/23/2021
Superstar gymnast Simone Biles could become the first woman since 1968 to repeat as the gold medalist in the individual all-around competition. But WSJ's Louise Radnofsky says that, for Biles, continuing to compete at the sport's highest level is also about keeping a spotlight on the crimes committed by former team doctor Larry Nassar. As the last self-identified survivor on the team, Biles is still pushing for more answers from USA Gymnastics.

Duration:00:17:08

An Ad Executive's New Challenge: Selling the Vaccine

7/22/2021
Last year, PJ Pereira got a big assignment: to help market new Covid-19 vaccines to the public. Pereira explains what he learned trying to convince vaccine-hesitant Americans to get the shot.

Duration:00:18:26

Wall Street CEOs Say Working From Home Isn't Working

7/21/2021
Major banks performed well while employees worked remotely. But executives at some banks are bringing their workers back to the office full time. WSJ's David Benoit explains what it could mean for the industry and the rest of corporate America.

Duration:00:14:56

Who's in Charge of Fixing Miami's Aging Condos?

7/20/2021
Many of Miami's condo buildings are vulnerable to the same kind of structural issues as Champlain Towers South, which collapsed last month. WSJ's Laura Kusisto explains why it's often untrained volunteer condo boards that are in charge of repairs.

Duration:00:20:10

Bezos' Blue Origin Takes Off

7/19/2021
Blue Origin is set to launch founder Jeff Bezos into space tomorrow, about a week after Virgin Galactic sent its own founder to the stars. WSJ's Micah Maidenberg explains how Blue Origin stacks up in the commercial space race.

Duration:00:16:43

The Man Behind Biden's Push for More Competition

7/16/2021
Legal scholar Tim Wu has spent years pushing for greater regulation of big American companies. To get his ideas into the mainstream, Wu has done everything from run for office to ride on a roller coaster with Stephen Colbert. WSJ's Ryan Tracy details how Wu's ideas made their way into President Biden's executive order to increase business competition.

Duration:00:20:00

Is Graduate School Worth the Price?

7/15/2021
New federal data show that many graduate students don't make nearly enough money to pay back their student loans. WSJ's Melissa Korn explains why some graduates of elite schools, like Columbia University, seem to have the worst outcomes.

Duration:00:19:12

Cuba's Protests Have an Anthem

7/14/2021
For the first time in 60 years, mass demonstrations are sweeping Cuba. Protesters are chanting one slogan: 'patria y vida,' or, 'homeland and life.' The phrase - a counterpoint to the revolutionary slogan 'homeland or death' - comes from a song written by Cuban dissidents. WSJ's Santiago Perez dives into the origins of the artist dissident movement and the song that defines this moment.

Duration:00:19:19

Didi's IPO Gets Caught In China's Tech Crackdown

7/13/2021
After Didi launched a successful IPO in New York last month, Beijing took punitive action against the ride hailing giant. It also established new rules for Chinese companies that want to list overseas. WSJ's Patrick Barta explains what that means for future economic cooperation between the U.S. and China.

Duration:00:17:17

When an Online Conspiracy Theory Turns Deadly

7/12/2021
Christopher Hallett built a business providing online legal advice in custody cases. His main offering was built on a conspiracy theory. But this conspiracy theory ended in murder. WSJ's Georgia Wells and Justin Scheck tell the tale.

Duration:00:27:26

The Quest to Find a Lost Purple Heart

7/2/2021
A Marine died in Fallujah at the height of the Iraq War. Years later, his family found out his Purple Heart was listed on an auction site. WSJ's Ben Kesling, who once served in the same company as the Marine, tells the story of how he helped track it down.

Duration:00:23:32

Hollywood's Fast and Furious Reopening

7/1/2021
F9, the latest Fast and Furious movie, is a major test of the movie industry's ability to rebound after the pandemic. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how the franchise grew so large, and why it became so important to Hollywood.

Duration:00:20:37

Hollywood's Fast and Furious Reopening

7/1/2021
F9, the latest Fast and Furious movie, is a major test of the movie industry's ability to rebound after the pandemic. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how the franchise grew so large, and why it became so important to Hollywood.

Duration:00:20:14

The Mixed Signals from the Collapsed Condo's Past

6/30/2021
Last week's building collapse near Miami was an event without modern precedent. Its cause remains a mystery. But building records, eyewitness accounts, and expert assessments are offering possible clues. WSJ's Jon Kamp details the potential warning signs from the history of Champlain Towers South.

Duration:00:17:38

Environmental Investing Frenzy Stretches Meaning of 'Green'

6/29/2021
Investors are pouring money into "green" companies, but what actually makes a company green? WSJ's Justin Scheck tells the story of The Metals Company, a deep sea mining startup that's set to go public at $2.9 billion.

Duration:00:17:10