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The Journal.

Wall Street Journal Radio

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Location:

United States

Description:

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Language:

English


Episodes

China's Evergrande Crisis

9/28/2021
Evergrande built homes for China's growing middle class for more than two decades. Now, the property developer is running out of money. WSJ's Quentin Webb explains how years of piling on debt brought Evergrande to a crisis point, and what its potential collapse could mean for China.

Duration:00:16:29

The Long Journey to Del Rio

9/27/2021
Last week, roughly 16,000 migrants showed up in Del Rio, Texas. Most of them were Haitian, but they didn't come directly from Haiti. They've been on a long journey. WSJ's Alicia Caldwell and Juan Montes explain how these Haitians reached Texas and what they're encountering at the border.

Duration:00:18:04

Harry and Meghan, Hollywood Royalty?

9/24/2021
Since Prince Harry and Meghan Markle quit the royal family, the couple have been building a Hollywood production company and signed deals with Netflix and Spotify. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how this royal career shift has been going.

Duration:00:18:36

Xi Jinping Is Rewriting the Rules of China's Economy

9/23/2021
The Chinese government is cracking down on big private corporations and reining in their power. WSJ's Lingling Wei shares her analysis which suggests this recent development is coming from China's President Xi Jinping's personal ideological shift from capitalism towards a Mao-style socialism.

Duration:00:21:11

The Snub That Made France Furious

9/22/2021
Last week, the U.S. announced a new multibillion-dollar deal to supply nuclear submarines to Australia. There was just one problem: Australia had already inked a submarine deal with France. WSJ's Matthew Dalton explains the sub snub and what it means for U.S.-France relations.

Duration:00:18:41

Why 'Buy Now, Pay Later' Is Popping Up Everywhere

9/21/2021
A growing number of retailers are offering customers the ability to buy a product and pay for it later in installments. WSJ's AnnaMaria Andriotis explains why the approach has become so popular and whether it's likely to stick around.

Duration:00:14:19

The Dogfight Over Dogecoin

9/20/2021
Dogecoin began as a joke cryptocurrency in 2013, but this year its price has soared, and now its market cap stands at about $30 billion. WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff says two competing organizations that both call themselves the Dogecoin Foundation are vying for the coin's trademark and its future. Representatives from both groups make their case about who should be dogecoin's steward going forward.

Duration:00:18:57

The Facebook Files, Part 4: The Outrage Algorithm

9/18/2021
In the fourth episode of our investigative series based on an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, we explore the fallout of a major algorithm change the company made in 2018. The documents outline how an emphasis on engagement incentivized the spread of divisive, sensational content and misinformation. WSJ's Keach Hagey and Jeff Horwitz explain how attempts from within the company to undo some of the damage were often thwarted.

Duration:00:28:06

The Facebook Files, Part 3: 'This Shouldn't Happen on Facebook'

9/18/2021
In the third episode of our investigative series based on an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, we look at a persistent problem on the platform: human trafficking. WSJ's Justin Scheck describes documents showing that Facebook has closely studied how human traffickers use the platform to ensnare victims and advertise illegal sex services. The documents also show Facebook's response to these findings, which is often inadequate or nothing at all. We also hear from Patricia Wanja...

Duration:00:28:03

'Moneyball' Meets Firefighting

9/17/2021
To combat increasingly extreme wildfires, firefighters are taking cues from the world of sports analytics. WSJ's Dan Frosch explains how the "Moneyball" sports data revolution is making its way into firefighting and why increasingly unpredictable fires are putting new computer models to the test.

Duration:00:18:05

Will the Vaccine Mandate Affect the Labor Shortage?

9/16/2021
Jack Schron has been encouraging his employees to get vaccinated. He also worries a vaccine mandate might cause them to quit. The manufacturing company president explains what the Biden administration's vaccine mandate could mean for him, and WSJ's Eric Morath discusses its impact on the labor market.

Duration:00:15:30

How to Stop a $45 Billion Crime Spree

9/15/2021
A brazen kind of shoplifting is plaguing America's retail stores, where people fill up garbage bags with items and simply walk out the door. WSJ's Rebecca Ballhaus explains how organized crime rings orchestrate the shoplifting. And Ben Dugan, the head of CVS' investigative unit, describes what he does to fight crime at his stores.

Duration:00:17:36

The Facebook Files, Part 2: 'We Make Body Image Issues Worse'

9/14/2021
In the second episode in our investigative series, we turn to research that Facebook has kept private: its internal studies on the effects of Instagram, one of its core products, on teen mental health. WSJ's Georgia Wells details the company's findings, which show that Instagram can be harmful for young users, particularly teen girls. Plus, Instagram head Adam Mosseri explains why he thinks there's no "silver bullet" for this problem.

Duration:00:36:45

The Facebook Files, Part 1: The Whitelist

9/13/2021
The Facebook Files, an investigative series from The Wall Street Journal, dives into an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, giving an unparalleled look inside the social media giant. In our first episode, WSJ's Jeff Horwitz explains how high-profile users from celebrities to politicians are shielded from the site's rules and protected from enforcement measures. The company does this in secret, even as CEO Mark Zuckerberg says publicly that all users are treated equally.

Duration:00:28:07

How the Afghan Women's Soccer Team Escaped the Taliban

9/10/2021
As the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, members of the country's women's soccer team - once symbols of a new Afghanistan - knew they needed to escape. WSJ's Drew Hinshaw tells the story of how the team's former captain, Khalida Popal, hatched a daring plan for their evacuation.

Duration:00:18:56

The Dashed Hopes of a Swift Economic Rebound

9/9/2021
Economists, CEOs and many others predicted earlier this summer that the economy would recover around Labor Day. But the Delta variant has changed all of that. WSJ's Eric Morath explains how the highly contagious strain is affecting business and job growth.

Duration:00:15:50

The Business of Forecasting Fashion

9/8/2021
The pandemic has disrupted a lot of things - including how people dress. We talk with WGSN fashion forecaster Francesca Muston about how the uncertain times have made predicting fashion trends more difficult and how other forces like climate change may shape fashion choices in the long term.

Duration:00:16:40

Scholastic's Succession Drama

9/7/2021
Scholastic, which is famous for children's books like Harry Potter and Clifford the Big Red Dog, has been controlled by the same family for more than a century. Then, the CEO unexpectedly died in June and his will had a controversial decision on succession. WSJ's Shalini Ramachandran on the drama that unfolded.

Duration:00:18:59

The Man Who Chose to Get Covid

9/3/2021
Jake Hopkins, a university student in the U.K., decided earlier this year to do something most people in the world have been trying to avoid: he volunteered to get Covid-19. Jake signed up for a human challenge trial that intentionally infects participants with the virus. He shares recordings from his experience in the controversial study, and WSJ's Jenny Strasburg explains the researchers' goals.

Duration:00:20:20

The First Country to Adopt Bitcoin

9/2/2021
In June, the president of El Salvador made an announcement that shocked the nation: It would become the first country to adopt bitcoin as a national currency. As "B-day" approaches, WSJ's Santiago Perez headed to El Salvador to hear how Salvadorans are feeling about the change.

Duration:00:17:36