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The Philosopher's Zone

ABC (Australia)

The simplest questions often have the most complex answers. The Philosopher's Zone is your guide through the strange thickets of logic, metaphysics and ethics. Presented by Joe Gelonesi. Episodes available from past series of The Philosopher's Zone, which ended 7 July 2013. New season begins 6 October 2013.

The simplest questions often have the most complex answers. The Philosopher's Zone is your guide through the strange thickets of logic, metaphysics and ethics. Presented by Joe Gelonesi. Episodes available from past series of The Philosopher's Zone, which ended 7 July 2013. New season begins 6 October 2013.
More Information

Location:

Melbourne, VIC

Description:

The simplest questions often have the most complex answers. The Philosopher's Zone is your guide through the strange thickets of logic, metaphysics and ethics. Presented by Joe Gelonesi. Episodes available from past series of The Philosopher's Zone, which ended 7 July 2013. New season begins 6 October 2013.

Language:

English

Contact:

Philosopher's Zone ABC Radio National GPO Box 9994 Sydney 2001 (02) 8333 1411


Episodes

Telling the story

8/5/2018
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Philosophy is usually thought of as the province of ideas and abstract thought. But this week’s guest is taking philosophy in a slightly different direction, yet makes perfect sense. US academic Barry Lam is the creator and host of Hi-Phi Nation, a podcast that bringing together philosophy and storytelling—the results are rather wonderful.

Duration:00:25:07

Remembering Stanley Cavell

7/29/2018
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Stanley Cavell, who died on June 19, was one of the world’s foremost contemporary thinkers, yet he always considered himself something of a philosophical outsider. His work ranged across the philosophy of language, aesthetics, ethics and epistemology—but also literature, cinema, and music. And his 'ordinary language' style and interest in questions of quality and value could be about to experience a renaissance.

Duration:00:25:09

When work stops working

7/22/2018
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Why do we work? According to Judaeo-Christian tradition, work is the result of a divine curse—and for many people in today’s labour market that comes as no surprise. And as more and more jobs become automated, fewer and fewer people will have them. An ideal future is a 'post-work' world where everybody has access to a universal basic income—but maybe there's an even better way.

Duration:00:25:01

On Evil

7/15/2018
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'Evil is one of those words that seem to convey moral clarity—we all feel we know evil when we see it. But there was once a time when 'evil' simply referred to mundane mischance or wrongdoing; its transformation into something almost metaphysical is a relatively recent turn.

Duration:00:25:09

No laughing matter

7/8/2018
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Philosophers tend not to be funny—Nietzsche is a notable exception, and Plato had his moments—but philosophy can have a humorous side.

Duration:00:25:09

Backyard ethics: defending the NIMBY

7/1/2018
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Suppose a new hospital or drug rehabilitation centre needs to be built. If you’re a NIMBY, then you’ll be fine with the project—as long as it doesn’t negatively affect your property value. NIMBYism is often touted as the scourge of suburbia, but maybe there’s more to it than meets the eye.

Duration:00:25:09

Guilty or not guilty

6/24/2018
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Second in a two-part series on Indian philosophy. Buddhism teaches that the self is an illusion—so what do we do with self-conscious emotions like guilt and shame, which can put useful brakes on ethical misconduct? If there’s no self to be ashamed of, how should we understand the emotion? The answer lies in an ancient series of Indian Buddhist texts: the Abhidharma.

Duration:00:25:08

The oblivion of India

6/17/2018
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Indian philosophy has thousands of years of history behind it, yet Western philosophers have largely ignored it—and their assumptions about Indian philosophy may have influenced the Western philosophical canon.

Duration:00:25:09

Knud Loegstrup and The Ethical Demand

6/10/2018
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Danish philosopher Knud Loegstrup was a contemporary of Sartre, Arendt and Levinas—but his influence outside the world of Nordic philosophy has been limited. Scott Stephens speaks with Loegstrup’s two English translators about his masterwork The Ethical Demand, and about some unexpected resonances with English moral philosopher Iris Murdoch.

Duration:00:29:40

Making differences

6/3/2018
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We're all keen on diversity these days—as long as it stays within proper boundaries. When it comes to moral values though, diverse perspectives can make us uncomfortable—so how do we manage it, and how can we do better?

Duration:00:25:01

Morals and the market

5/27/2018
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Neoliberalism and human rights are often portrayed as standing in opposition to each other, with the fat cats at the big end of town pulling the economic levers. But neoliberalism and the discourse of modern human rights can actually be seen as close philosophical cousins.

Duration:00:25:01

Rewilding

5/20/2018
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Most of us feel the itch of the primitive from time to time—to run without shoes, try a paleo diet, or just ditch the smartphone. The primitivist ideal exerts a seductive pull in tech-obsessed contemporary western society, but is the ideal based on a highly questionable set of philosophical assumptions?

Duration:00:25:01

The freedom of the City

5/13/2018
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May 1968 was a watershed moment in political philosophy, and its ripple effect continues. We follow the long trajectory of May '68—from the universities and streets of Paris fifty years ago, via the work of pioneering feminist Luce Irigaray, all the way to the 'New Municipalism' that’s transforming the political and social landscapes of cities around the world today.

Duration:00:25:01

The fate of the Common Good

5/6/2018
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The idea of the common good drove some of the most important social developments of the 20th century: Franklin D Roosevelt’s New Deal, civil rights, the United Nations, the European Union. Today, as western societies become more fragmented and organisations like the EU begin to fray at the edges, we ask whether nations and individuals are beginning to lose faith in the common good.

Duration:00:25:01

Who are you?

4/29/2018
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The question of exactly what constitutes identity is an old and much-contested one. Is personhood located in a community? A culture? A race? Or is it something singular and immanent, located somewhere in the deepest recesses of the individual?

Duration:00:25:01

The beauty imperative

4/22/2018
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What does it mean when beauty moves from aesthetic choice to ethical ideal? The age-old belief that true beauty lies within is ever harder to sustain today. It was once sidelined as a 'women’s issue' but beauty is now taking its place as a subject for serious philosophical scrutiny.

Duration:00:25:01

Martin Luther King: political philosopher

4/15/2018
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We don’t routinely think of political figures as philosophers, but when but comes to Martin Luther King maybe we should. King was a deep thinker with a remarkably coherent vision of the moral life and a bracing take on some of the fundamental questions of political philosophy.

Duration:00:25:01

Thinking Out Loud

4/9/2018
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Thinking Out Loud: The Sydney Lectures in Philosophy and Society aims to bring a leading international thinker to Western Sydney University annually to present a series of public lectures. This year Rosi Braidotti will present The Human in the Age of Technology and Climate Change. The idea of ‘human’ is undergoing rapid change. Some have termed this the age of the ‘post-human’, and it might appear a moment of great promise and liberation. Yet an underside of injustice and exclusion...

Duration:00:05:05

The shadow of eugenics

4/8/2018
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Eugenics is a science that seems to belong back in the darkest days of the 20th century. But today, 'newgenics' has people worried, as reproductive technologies make it increasingly possible to filter out certain genetic disorders. How does this colour our notion of what constitutes a 'desirable' or 'undesirable' human subject?

Duration:00:25:01

Oh, the Humanities

4/1/2018
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We often hear that the academic Humanities and social sciences are in crisis—underfunded, out of touch with the job market, hamstrung by political correctness and moral relativism. So why study philosophy? And could a good dose of scientific method help to solve the problem—if indeed there is one?

Duration:00:25:01