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As described by Edward O. Wilson — perhaps the best known American biologist, researcher, naturalist and author — invertebrates are "The Little Things That Run the World." And indeed they do, in so many ways. In terms of numbers — while most invertebrates are pretty small, the sheer number of them is astounding. Together, they have more biomass than any other animal on earth. Learn more about the fascinating creatures that run the world, with Bug Bytes from the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium.

As described by Edward O. Wilson — perhaps the best known American biologist, researcher, naturalist and author — invertebrates are "The Little Things That Run the World." And indeed they do, in so many ways. In terms of numbers — while most invertebrates are pretty small, the sheer number of them is astounding. Together, they have more biomass than any other animal on earth. Learn more about the fascinating creatures that run the world, with Bug Bytes from the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium.
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Location:

United States

Description:

As described by Edward O. Wilson — perhaps the best known American biologist, researcher, naturalist and author — invertebrates are "The Little Things That Run the World." And indeed they do, in so many ways. In terms of numbers — while most invertebrates are pretty small, the sheer number of them is astounding. Together, they have more biomass than any other animal on earth. Learn more about the fascinating creatures that run the world, with Bug Bytes from the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium.

Language:

English

Contact:

4062434203


Episodes

Bug Bytes: Fiddler Crabs - The Kings Of Animal Weaponry

6/24/2019
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When you think of an animal with an impressive weapon, the first images that pop to mind might be a bull elk or moose with their massive antlers. Or maybe a bull elephant with its enormous tusks. But the king of weaponry in the animal kingdom might surprise you: a fiddler crab that’s less than 2 inches long.

Duration:00:02:14

Bug Bytes: Insect Farts

6/17/2019
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We’ve all done it. Most of us have joked about it. Even animals do it. Pooting. Tooting. Who ever denied it, supplied it. We all pass gas. But did you know that insects fart too? And in the case of the beaded lacewing, they lend a whole new meaning to “silent, but deadly.”

Duration:00:02:15

Bug Bytes: Earwigs - Creepy But Caring

6/10/2019
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For some people it’s spiders. For others it’s centipedes. But for many people, the answer to “What kind of bug really creeps you out” is earwigs. Maybe it’s the big pincers at the end of their abdomen? Maybe it’s the fact that it's a bug with the word “ear” in its name. Whatever the case, they’re not high on many people’s lists of lovable insects.

Duration:00:02:15

Bug Bytes: When 'Follow The Leader' Turns Deadly

6/3/2019
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There are many games you probably played as a child. Games that for all intents and purposes were innocent and safe. But who would imagine that a game of “follow the leader” could be deadly? It certainly can be for army ants. In fact, it can actually result in the death of the entire swarm.

Duration:00:02:15

Bug Bytes: Honey Bee Waggle Dance

5/21/2019
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The next time you discover a new restaurant that you love, try telling your friends about it through interpretive dance. That’s what you would do if you were a honeybee.

Duration:00:02:15

Bug Bytes: Bombardier Beetle

5/7/2019
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If any beetle was said to have an “explosive personality,” it would have to be the bombardier beetle. They may appear to be your average, everyday beetle, but they’ve got a surprise up their tiny little sleeves — or more accurately, their rear ends. They’ve got some serious junk in the trunk.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Moths Vs. Butterflies

5/7/2019
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In this corner, weighing in with approximately 700 different species in the United States … the Butterflies. And in the opposite corner, weighing in with over 15,000 species in the United States … the Moths. While butterflies get most of the attention, moths dominate the order Lepidoptera (comprised of moths and butterflies) with 90% of the known species. But when looking at an individual, how can you easily tell which is which?

Duration:00:02:27

Bug Bytes: Spider Silk

2/5/2019
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Thanks to the children’s novel Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, most of us are familiar with the circular shape of an orb weaver spider web. Charlotte certainly had no trouble creating a new web overnight, but it might be more complicated than you think.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Mosquitoes

2/5/2019
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Imagine enjoying beautiful summer evenings without the nuisance of mosquitoes. Humans and other animals know mosquitoes as annoying, buzzing bloodsuckers. Well, at least female mosquitoes are. Only female mosquitoes suck blood, which they need to provision their eggs with essential amino acids.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Mourning Cloak Butterfly

2/5/2019
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If you live in our northern states, some years spring can’t come soon enough. Seeing your first butterfly of the year must be a sure sign that spring has sprung — unless it’s a mourning cloak butterfly. Mourning cloaks are a type of tortoiseshell butterfly. Along with a handful of butterflies known as anglewings, tortoiseshells are the first butterflies we see flying in late winter or early spring.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Antlions

2/5/2019
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If you’re a Star Wars fan, they may remind you of the Sarlacc and its deadly sand pit in the "Return of the Jedi." In their adult life stage, antlions are pretty innocent. With long, slender abdomens and two pairs of translucent wings, they resemble dragonflies or damselflies and mostly feed on nectar and pollen.

Duration:00:02:14

Bug Bytes: Tiger Beetles

2/5/2019
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Imagine a grizzly bear that can run over 135 miles per hour. Obviously, a grizzly can’t run that fast, but factoring in their smaller size, that’s what tiger beetles are to their potential prey.

Duration:00:02:13

Bug Bytes: Parthenogenesis – Walking Sticks

2/5/2019
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When it comes to finding a potential mate for female Australian walking sticks, they can afford to “swipe left” all day. That’s because many species of walking sticks (or phasmids) are parthenogenic, meaning they can successfully produce offspring without needing to mate. This is a form of asexual reproduction where the growth and development of an embryo occurs without fertilization.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Thar She Glows – Scorpions

2/5/2019
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There are nearly 2,000 species of scorpions in the world. And while individual species may live thousands of miles apart, they have one thing in common: they glow a beautiful blue-green color under ultraviolet light. A thin, transparent film in the outermost layer of their exoskeleton contains a protein that glows when exposed to ultraviolet rays, which are found in regular sunlight.

Duration:00:02:14

Bug Bytes: Dragonflies

2/5/2019
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Beware the dragonfly – This is great advice if you are just about any other flying insect, because dragonflies are incredible predators that rule the buggy skies. They are considered some of the best hunters in the insect world. Thanks to a combination of amazing eyesight and maneuverability, they catch whatever prey they set their sights on 95 percent of the time.

Duration:00:02:18

Bug Bytes: Can You Hear Me Now?

2/5/2019
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Praying mantids are among some of our best-known and well-liked insects. Part of their popularity comes from the fact that: They can be found in all of the lower 48 states, so you’ve likely had an encounter with one at some time. They are more animated than other insect species, moving in ways that are almost human-like. And they’ve also been popularized by being featured in movies like "A Bug’s Life," "Kung Foo Panda," and "Goosebumps" to name a few.

Duration:00:02:14

Bug Bytes: Sheer Numbers

2/5/2019
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As described by Edward O. Wilson — who is perhaps the best known American biologist, researcher, naturalist and author — invertebrates are: "The Little Things That Run the World." And indeed they do, in so many ways.

Duration:00:02:16