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Ipse Dixit

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Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. It is hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law, and features a different guest on each episode.

Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. It is hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law, and features a different guest on each episode.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. It is hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law, and features a different guest on each episode.

Twitter:

@brianlfrye

Language:

English

Contact:

9172732382


Episodes

David Eil on Moving from Economics to Law

1/19/2019
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In this episode, David Eil, a former economics professor at George Mason University and current law student at Columbia Law School, discusses his experience of moving from one discipline to another and from one side of the podium to the other. Among other things, he describes why he decided to leave economics and attend law school, and how his background in economics has informed his experience of law school. Eil is on Twitter at @economistified.

Duration:00:36:40

From the Archives 42: Supreme Court Cases, Chisholm v. Georgia

1/18/2019
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In 1962, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, the "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases for the "Second Series" of his "Supreme Court Cases" recordings. The scripts were directed by S.P. Puner, performed by John Randolph, Jack Curtis, and Martin Wolfson, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. in January 1963. According to the record sleeve: The script for Chisholm v. Georgia (1793) was written...

Duration:00:14:42

Charlotte Tschider on Consent & Choice in Health Data

1/18/2019
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In this episode, Charlotte Tschider, Jaharis Faculty Fellow in Health Law and Intellectual Property at DePaul University College of Law, discusses her article "The Consent Myth: Improving Choice for Patients of the Future," which will appear in the Washington University Law Review. Tschider briefly describes the history of data privacy regulation and how the current regulatory regime struggles to account for new technologies that collect and process massive amounts of data. She explains why...

Duration:00:44:38

From the Archives 41: Supreme Court Cases, Brown v. Board of Education (1961)

1/17/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Brown v. Board of Education (The Segregation Cases) (1954) was written by Harrison J. Goldin, who later served in the New York...

Duration:00:08:18

Jacob Rooksby on Becoming a Law School Dean

1/17/2019
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In this episode, Jacob H. Rooksby, Dean of Gonzaga University School of Law, Professor of Law, and Professor of Education, discusses his experiences pursuing a deanship and becoming a dean. Rooksby became the Dean of Gonzaga Law in June 2018. He describes his background and experiences as a professor, and how he became interested in law school administration. He explains how he prepared to look for a deanship and how he prepared to become a dean. He also reflects on what he has learned on...

Duration:00:39:53

From the Archives 40: Supreme Court Cases, NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. (1961)

1/16/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. (1937) was written by Zane Klein, who among other things served on...

Duration:00:09:12

From the Archives 39: Supreme Court Cases, Schechter v. The United States (1961)

1/15/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Schechter v. The United States (The National Industrial Recovery Act Case) (1935) was written by William J. Brennan III, the son...

Duration:00:08:32

Derek Miller on the History of the Performance Right

1/15/2019
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In this episode, Derek Miller, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, discusses his new book, "Copyright and the Value of Performance, 1770-1911," which is published by Cambridge University Press. Miller provides a comprehensive history of the origins and development of the concept of copyright in performance. Among other things, he explains the dialectical relationship between the social and economic "value" of performance in historical context, and how...

Duration:00:39:48

From the Archives 38: Supreme Court Cases, Powell v. Alabama (1961)

1/14/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Powell v. Alabama (1932) was written by Paul N. Klotz.

Duration:00:08:29

Wesley Hottot on Timbs v. Indiana & the Excessive Fines Clause

1/14/2019
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In this episode, Wesley Hottot, a Senior Attorney at the Institute for Justice, discusses the pending Supreme Court case Timbs v. Indiana, in which he represented the petitioner, Tyson Timbs. Hottot describes the background of the case and explains the constitutional issue at stake: Whether the Eighth Amendment's Excessive Fines Clause is incorporated against the states. He discusses the process of briefing the case and preparing for the oral argument, and reflects on the experience of...

Duration:00:50:09

From the Archives 37: Supreme Court Cases, Farmers' Loan and Trust Company v. Pollock (1961)

1/13/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Farmers' Loan and Trust Company v. Pollock (1895) was written by Bruce Hart, who became an author and composer, and is best-known...

Duration:00:07:13

Anthony Kreis on the History of the Law of Sexuality & Gender

1/12/2019
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In this episode, Anthony Michael Kreis, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law discusses his new article, "Anxious Masculinity: American Homophobia and the Third Sex." Kreis describes the "confusion" at the heart of the law of sexuality, and ties it to the history of the concept of gender. He describes the evolution of the policing of gender norms through American history, and the emergence of the concept of the "third sex" to describe LGBTQ identities. He...

Duration:00:43:08

From the Archives 36: Supreme Court Cases, Munn v. Illinois (1961)

1/12/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Munn v. Illinois (The Granger Cases) (1877) was written by Marshall S. Blonsky, who is currently a professor at the New School...

Duration:00:08:13

David Ziff on Learning to Love the Bluebook

1/11/2019
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In this episode, David J.S. Ziff, Director of the Legal Writing Program and Senior Law Lecturer at the University of Washington School of Law, discusses his article "Book Review of The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation—The Worst System of Citation Except for All the Others," which was published in the Journal of Legal Education. Ziff provides a brief history of the Bluebook, the ubiquitous guide to legal citation that everyone loves to hate, and explains why efforts to replace it have...

Duration:00:43:59

John Culhane on Reconciling Freedom of Expression & Anti-Discrimination

1/11/2019
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In this episode, John Culhane, Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Family Health Law & Policy Institute at Widener University Delaware Law School, discusses his article "The Right to Say, But Not to Do: Balancing First Amendment Freedom of Expression with the Anti-Discrimination Imperative," which was published in the Widener Law Review. Culhane reflects on the inherent tension between the values of freedom of expression and anti-discrimination, which the Supreme Court recently tried and...

Duration:00:36:50

From the Archives 35: Supreme Court Cases, Dred Scott v. Sandford (1961)

1/11/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) was written by A.B. Glickman, who became a civic leader in Cleveland, Ohio, and an adjunct professor...

Duration:00:12:46

Amanda Levendowski on Copyright & AI's Implicit Bias Problem

1/11/2019
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In this episode, Amanda Levendowski, a Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Technology Law & Policy Clinic at NYU Law, discusses her article "How Copyright Law Can Fix Artificial Intelligence's Implicit Bias Problem," which was published in the Washington Law Review. Levendowski explains that "artificial intelligence" algorithms use "machine learning" to create heuristics for solving problems, but need large data sets in order to work. Unfortunately, many widely available and heavily used...

Duration:00:34:53

Zvi Rosen on the History of Copyright Registration

1/10/2019
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In this episode, Zvi S. Rosen, Visiting Scholar and Professorial Lecturer in Law at George Washington University School of Law, discusses his article "An Empirical Study of 225 Years of Copyright Registrations," which he co-authored with Richard Schwinn, Research Economist at the U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Advocacy. Rosen and Schwinn's article "presents the first complete record of US copyright registrations from 1790 through 2015, using all available records of...

Duration:00:37:07

Jill Wieber Lens on Tort Law's Devaluation of Stillbirth

1/10/2019
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In this episode, Jill Wieber Lens, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Arkansas Fayetteville, discusses her article "Tort Law's Devaluation of Stillbirth." Lens describes the death of her son Caleb in stillbirth and the pain caused by her loss. She explains that stillbirth is far more common than people realize, and that many stillbirths are preventable and tortious. However, the tort law of many states devalues and fails to adequately compensate people whose children die in...

Duration:00:41:13

From the Archives 34: Supreme Court Cases, Gibbons v. Ogden (1961)

1/10/2019
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In 1960, Professor Fred Rodell of Yale Law School, "bad boy of American legal academia," asked his students to write scripts describing important Supreme Court cases. The scripts were directed by David Allen, performed by David Allen, Paul Sparer, and Jack Curtis, and released on LP by Educational Audio Visual, Inc. According to the record sleeve: The script for Gibbons v. Ogden (1824) was written by Steve Duke, who is currently a professor of law at Yale Law School.

Duration:00:10:05