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Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know

Education Podcasts

We are asking the experts why things are the way they are. Why do interstates cut through cities? What does my social media post say about me? We are finding the "why" to questions you didn't even know you had. Join us for a chat with Auburn Experts from the College of Liberal Arts to learn all the things you didn't know, you didn't know.

Location:

United States

Description:

We are asking the experts why things are the way they are. Why do interstates cut through cities? What does my social media post say about me? We are finding the "why" to questions you didn't even know you had. Join us for a chat with Auburn Experts from the College of Liberal Arts to learn all the things you didn't know, you didn't know.

Language:

English

Contact:

3347974723


Episodes
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...about MENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS

1/12/2024
Interoception is how we feel and understand internal sensations like hunger, pain or heart rate. Associate Professor April Smith is developing a new tool that targets interoception as an avenue to improve mental health. Her online intervention, Reconnecting to Internal Sensations and Experiences (RISE), has already shown success in active-duty service members and clinical patients and is currently being tested in college students and veterinarians.

Duration:00:16:10

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about... CHRISTMAS

12/13/2023
In this yuletide adventure, Brandon and Dr. Ferguson unwrap the layers of Christmas traditions, from the fascinating tales of Santa Claus's evolution to the unexpected global impact of this beloved holiday. Dr. Ferguson shares heartwarming childhood memories and the inspiration behind his research on Christmas around the world. Discover the surprising stories behind the Christmas truce during World War I, where enemies laid down their arms and shared moments of peace and camaraderie. Delve into the diverse celebrations across the globe, from the secular festivities in Japan to the religious traditions in Russia and the unique Christmas customs in Trinidad. Explore the commercialization paradox of Christmas, where the fear of secularization led to the creation of products aiming to preserve the religious essence of the holiday. Unpack the historical tensions between Christianity and commerce, revealing how publishers and manufacturers contributed to the commercialization while trying to combat its effects. And, of course, no Christmas episode would be complete without sharing favorite Christmas movies and traditions.

Duration:00:33:00

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about... THE FOOD LABEL FABLE

11/15/2023
How did the Nutrition Facts label come to appear on millions of everyday American household food products? Associate Professor of History Xaq Frohlich’s book, “From Label to Table: Regulating Food in America in the Information Age,” explains the political, scientific and economic power struggles that led to the ever-present food label.

Duration:00:14:26

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... about SUICIDE PREVENTION

10/15/2023
People can call or text 988 or chat 988lifeline.org for themselves or if they are worried about a loved one who may need crisis support. 988 serves as a universal entry point so that no matter where you live in the United States, you can reach a trained crisis counselor who can help. 988 offers 24/7 access to trained crisis counselors who can help people experiencing mental health-related distress. In this episode of the Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know podcast Dr. Tierra James walks us through her work deploying the community readiness model in Northeast Ohio to understand the cause of a rise in suicide rates in the African-American community.

Duration:00:16:28

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about... WOMEN IN POLITICS

9/15/2023
In Bringing Home the White House, Melissa Estes Blair introduces us to five fascinating yet largely unheralded women who were at the heart of campaigns to elect and reelect some of our most beloved presidents. By examining the roles of these political strategists in affecting the outcome of presidential elections, Blair sheds light on their historical importance and the relevance of their individual influence. In the middle decades of the twentieth century both major political parties had Women's Divisions. The leaders of these divisions--five women who held the job from 1932 until 1958--organized tens of thousands of women all over the country, turning them into the "saleswomen for the party" by providing them with talking points, fliers, and other material they needed to strike up political conversations with their friends and neighbors. The leaders of the Women's Divisions also produced a huge portion of the media used by the campaigns--over 90 percent of all print material in the 1930s--and were close advisors of the presidents of both parties. In spite of their importance, these women and their work have been left out of the narratives of midcentury America. In telling the story of these five West Wing women, Blair reveals the ways that women were central to American politics from the depths of the Great Depression to the height of the Cold War. Order your copy of Bringing home the Whitehouse now: aub.ie/orderbook

Duration:00:19:13

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about... THE HOLLYWOOD STRIKES

8/24/2023

Duration:00:22:45

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about... MECHANICAL HANDS

4/17/2023
Researchers in the College of Liberal Arts’ Department of History and the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering at Auburn University hope to recreate part of the past by creating a working model of one of the world’s earliest mechanical prosthetics. The Kassel Hand, a right-hand prosthesis from Germany, is one of the earliest examples of a form of wearable technology that first appeared in the sixteenth century. Assistant Professor of History Heidi Hausse first began to study it as part of her work on material culture, or the study of how historical artifacts inform life and how we live it. MORE: https://cla.auburn.edu/news/articles/history-and-engineering-faculty-recreating-historical-prosthetic/

Duration:00:10:15

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about EATING DISORDERS

10/28/2022
Research has found that men make up about 33% of eating disorder cases and over recent years have faced escalating social pressures to become unrealistically lean and muscular. However, few programs have been developed to address the needs of men struggling with eating disorders. But work happening now at Auburn University stands to bring new treatments to this often-hidden issue.

Duration:00:26:08

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about Mental Health in Prison

9/15/2022
Right now there are over 2 million people imprisoned across the United States, that represents a 500% increase over the last 40 years, and despite making up only 5% of the world's population, America accounts for more than 20% of the world's incarcerations. With prisons across the country, filling up and with most incarcerated individuals suffering from mental health conditions, many of them serious, understanding the impact of those illnesses, both inside and outside the prison walls, is increasingly important.

Duration:00:21:26

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about DIVERSITY IN THE AVIATION INDUSTRY

4/26/2022
If you look at the websites for each of the major US airlines, you will find on each a statement about their focus on inclusion and diversity. You’ll see statistics and plans for increasing diversity in the flight deck and throughout the company. So how bad is the problem and the million-dollar question, How do you fix it? In this episode of the Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know podcast we take a deep dive into the history, the problem and potential solutions to diversifying the aviation industry

Duration:00:24:46

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about ASSESSING THE FLAVORS OF ENGLISH

3/15/2022
Who you are, where you’re from and how you were raised all affect the way you communicate. Megan-Brette Hamilton, a speech language and hearing science researcher, explains how to embrace the different ways we all speak the same language. Her discussion also gives practical tips that educators. speech language pathologists, and educational leaders can understand and embrace the broad diversity of dialects a student may use. Visit Megan-Brette's website: https://www.meganbrettehamilton.com Listen to the Honeybee connection Podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1388161

Duration:00:31:06

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about ACCESSIBLE CONTENT CREATION

2/15/2022
When you’re scrolling through social media you’ve probably seen videos with captions scrolling on the bottom. You’ve also probably seen them on a tv in a waiting room or on the bottom of your favorite news broadcast. Beyond allowing you to know what is happening in a video without everyone around you hearing it, these captions are a content lifeline to many individuals with auditory impairments. There are many ways to make content accessible: captions, alt text and even the transcript that accompanies this podcast help all users enjoy digital content. Intrested in using the LUCIA Lab? Learn More: cla.auburn.edu/lucia/

Duration:00:23:15

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about MENTAL HEALTH IN HIGH STRESS CAREERS

11/8/2021
Employees on the frontlines are routinely placed in high-stress, high-pressure situations. In this episode of the Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know, Dr. Gargi Sawhney discusses the serious impact that poor mental health can have on employees. Additionally, she breaks down the coping strategies that her research found to be successful in mitigating mental health symptoms and the key things organizational leaders can do to best support their employees.

Duration:00:10:21

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about TEACHING THE HISTORY OF SLAVERY

10/15/2021
Dr. Kennington’s research can help us better understand the antebellum south, slavery in Alabama, the Domestic Slave Trade and how it all relates to our experiences in 21st century America. Her discussion on this episode of the “Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know” podcast uncovers how our past shapes the present and how we can all get a better understanding of the history of America and the South.

Duration:00:14:47

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about ORGANIZATIONS & SOCIAL CHANGE

5/3/2021
The world is changing, FAST. The ways that companies and organizations communicate with their constituents is incredibly important - this has become even more evident in the last year. On this podcast, Dr. Mike Milford, an expert in pop culture, sports and political messaging, breaks down things you didn't know you didn't know about organizations and social change.

Duration:00:17:13

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about THE INTERSTATE

3/19/2021
Interstates were built throughout the United States during the civil rights movement, and because of the political climate at the time, many of the new highways were used as tools to cement segregation in cities. Dr. Becki Retzlaff is a planning expert and has spent years studying the history of the interstate. Join us for a conversation to learn things you didn't know you didn't know about the history of the interstate and what the future may look like.

Duration:00:18:39