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Corporate training is a big industry, and a potentially lucrative one for many freelancers and consultants. I should know; I've been training part time for nearly 20 years, and full time for about 10. Training has tons of advantages over "traditional" consulting — it pays well, you don't deal with bug reports and feature requests on a regular basis, you can schedule your work far in advance, and it leads to recurring revenue from satisfied clients. But if you're going to train, then you have to think a bit about what your'e doing. I divide this thinking into three parts: Pedagogical, logistical, and business. In this podcast, I'll explore these three elements of training. I'll also interview trainers to ask them about how they get clients, how they charge, how they create and improve their courses, and how you can become a better trainer, too.

Corporate training is a big industry, and a potentially lucrative one for many freelancers and consultants. I should know; I've been training part time for nearly 20 years, and full time for about 10. Training has tons of advantages over "traditional" consulting — it pays well, you don't deal with bug reports and feature requests on a regular basis, you can schedule your work far in advance, and it leads to recurring revenue from satisfied clients. But if you're going to train, then you have to think a bit about what your'e doing. I divide this thinking into three parts: Pedagogical, logistical, and business. In this podcast, I'll explore these three elements of training. I'll also interview trainers to ask them about how they get clients, how they charge, how they create and improve their courses, and how you can become a better trainer, too.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Corporate training is a big industry, and a potentially lucrative one for many freelancers and consultants. I should know; I've been training part time for nearly 20 years, and full time for about 10. Training has tons of advantages over "traditional" consulting — it pays well, you don't deal with bug reports and feature requests on a regular basis, you can schedule your work far in advance, and it leads to recurring revenue from satisfied clients. But if you're going to train, then you have to think a bit about what your'e doing. I divide this thinking into three parts: Pedagogical, logistical, and business. In this podcast, I'll explore these three elements of training. I'll also interview trainers to ask them about how they get clients, how they charge, how they create and improve their courses, and how you can become a better trainer, too.

Language:

English


Episodes

Episode 4: Interview with Jason Swett, coder and trainer

2/21/2019
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Interview with Jason Swett, developer and trainer. How did he get into training? What's it like to work with a training company? How do you deal with problems and failures when training? You can read more about him at http://codewithjason.com/.

Duration:00:51:57

Episode 2: Training managers, your real clients

4/24/2018
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As a trainer, it's easy to think that your clients are your students. Not true! An intro to training managers, who they are, and how you can and should think about them.

Duration:00:15:09

Episode 3: Knowing vs. Teaching

4/24/2018
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Do you need to be an expert in order to teach? Yes, but that's not sufficient. There's a lot more to teaching a topic than just being an expert. In this episode, I talk about "content knowledge" vs. "pedagogical content knowledge," and how you can improve on both fronts.

Duration:00:23:53

Episode 1: Welcome, and my background in training

4/23/2018
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Intro to the podcast: Who am I, and what is this podcast about?

Duration:00:22:40