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Rockland, MA

Language:

English

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1-877-451-5098


Episodes

Do The Right Thing

6/14/2018
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"Making Peace With Vietnam" is a documentary that chronicles life in that nation as Vietnam vets return to do humanitarian work. Plus, Ludwig Wittgenstein may be the greatest philosopher of the 20th century, but few people know about him.

Duration:00:51:57

Moving Pictures

6/8/2018
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When you think animation you might think the Simpsons or Disney or Spirited Away. But animation artist Anh Do says animation art is everything that moves. He got his start as a boy who emigrated to America from Vietnam with no English skills, so he drew pictures of everything he needed.

Duration:00:51:54

Animal Intersections

6/1/2018
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The author of, A Hoot in the Light: Illuminating the Sensory Modes of Animal Communication, says that by recognizing animal voices, we make our particular brand of humanism a little more humane. And: “Honeybee” Brown is planting apiaries in urban community gardens in an effort to save the ailing honeybee.

Duration:00:51:56

1619: Women and Africans

5/25/2018
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The first captive Africans arrived in the Jamestown settlement in Virginia in 1619. A shipload of women intended as mates for the male settlers also arrived that year. How should we be telling and commemorating this history in 2019?

Duration:00:51:55

Art's Complicated

5/17/2018
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Sam Blanchard is a digital artist who uses humor and technology in his work. One of his favorites is a nod to his phobias--including going bald and a fear of heights!

Duration:00:52:00

Get Rhythm

5/10/2018
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Bix Beiderbecke was one of the first great legends of jazz, but his recording career lasted just six years. A book by Brendan Wolfe, Finding Bix: The Life and Afterlife of a Jazz Legend, connects Beiderbecke's music, history, and legend.

Duration:00:51:57

The Pains of Recovery

5/3/2018
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"Councilors Without Borders" traveled to Puerto Rico to help people who continue to suffer after the Hurricane Maria disaster. Residents are still feeling stressed by the storm and worry about the new storm season to come.

Duration:00:52:01

Cents and Sensibility

4/27/2018
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Jane Austen novels provide timeless insight into our virtues and vices. It turns out she drew inspiration on how to live a moral life from the great 18th century economist Adam Smith.

Duration:00:51:57

Through an Indian's Looking Glass

4/12/2018
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A story of Native American resilience comes to life in a new biography of Black Elk, an Oglala Lakota medicine man and Catholic preacher. Black Elk was born in 1863 and died at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Another new book illuminates the life of a Pequot Indian activist and author who is little known today, but has been called the Native American Frederick Douglas. William Apess challenged the power structure of his day using the pen, the pulpit, and protest.

Duration:00:51:58

Real Love with Sharon Saltzberg

4/6/2018
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In her new book, Real Love, Sharon Salzberg--one of the world's leading authorities on love and meditation--shows us love isn't just an emotion we feel when we're in a romantic relationship. It's an ability we can nurture and cultivate. Also, Oliver Hill shares his journey in the 1960's from the segregated south, to black radicalism, to Transcendental Meditation with the Beach Boys. Also: How "The Pause" got started. We talk with emergency care nurse Jonathan Bartels, who just wanted to...

Duration:00:51:58

Future Farming of America

3/30/2018
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Southwest Virginia has seen a decline in coal and tobacco—two industries that once boomed in the region. Could hemp be a way to boost the local economy? And more.

Duration:00:51:56

Moonshine and Prohibition

3/23/2018
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South Carolina saw the statewide prohibition of alcohol in 1915. But not before the state established its own dispensary system more than a decade earlier. Plus: oral histories of moonshiners in Appalachia.

Duration:00:28:59

Building a Wall

3/16/2018
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When Thomas Jefferson designed the University of Virginia’s central Rotunda, he set out to build a temple to the book, a stunning rebuke to the Christian churches that anchored every other college of his day. But Jefferson’s secular utopia didn’t pan out exactly as he planned.

Duration:00:51:58

Privatization and Public Universities

3/9/2018
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With state support shrinking and the dependence on private support increasing for most public universities what does the financial landscape of the future look like? What makes an institution public? Is it the source of funding? History? Mission? Or something else?

Duration:00:51:57

The Golden Age of Flattery

3/2/2018
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Washington has its fair share of brown-nosers. We talk with the authors of Sucking Up: A Brief Consideration of Sycophancy about yes-men, now and through the ages.

Duration:00:28:59

Invisible Founders

2/23/2018
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Scholars, historic interpreters, and descendants of enslaved people recently gathered at Montpelier, the home of James Madison. They were there to create a rubric for historic sites who want to engage descendant communities in their work. We share stories and interviews from Montpelier's Summit on Slavery.

Duration:00:51:57

Driving While Black

2/16/2018
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Poet Kiki Petrosino in her poem, If My Body Is a Text, reflects on a year of tragic outcomes during traffic stops between police and African American drivers. Plus: Most of us have heard of Negro League Baseball, but there were many other all-black sports leagues and teams across America in the 20th century. David Wiggins shares how African-American athletes built their own place for sports in a segregated world.

Duration:00:28:57

Love Me Do

2/9/2018
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Wine, chocolate, and flowers. We talk with experts about these Valentine's Day essentials.

Duration:00:51:58

Civil Rights and Civil War Monuments

2/2/2018
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Maggie Walker was an African American teacher and businesswoman and the first woman of any race to charter a bank in the United States. There's now a statue of her in the former capital of the Confederacy. Plus: A town’s historical markers tell visitors the story of a place. But what do they leave out?

Duration:00:28:56

Lethal Doses

1/29/2018
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America is hooked on opioids—by one count, there are currently more opioid prescriptions than people in the southeastern United States. This week we’re taking a deep dive into the causes of the opioid crisis. And more.

Duration:00:28:58