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With Good Reason Radio

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Location:

Rockland, MA

Language:

English

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1-877-451-5098


Episodes

Healing Displacement

8/14/2019
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Dr. Fern Hauck (University of Virginia Medical System) and Farah Ibrahim (CHIP) work to connect refugees and asylum seekers with high-quality healthcare, no matter what language they speak or what trauma they’ve suffered. Al Fuertes (George Mason University) is also dedicated to improving outcomes for refugees and displaced peoples. He draws on his personal experience growing up under martial law to inform his transformative approach to healing. Later in the show: In Border Odyssey Charles...

Duration:00:51:55

Talking Hurricanes

8/9/2019
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In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. In the years since, as residents have come and gone and rebuilt their lives, a lot has changed about the city-- including, says Katie Carmichael (Virginia Tech), the way people talk. The author of Sudden Spring, Rick Van Noy (Radford University) says that, in many Southern communities, climate change is already here. Later in the show: Residents of Tangier Island could become some of America’s first climate refugees—unless they get a...

Duration:00:51:58

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

8/1/2019
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Does the radiation emitted by our cell phones harm us? Deborah O’Dell (University of Mary Washington) recently finished a study that found cell phone radiation can cause changes to our cells. Also: In 2018, most people diagnosed with blood cancer can find a donor to help with their treatment. But not everyone. Karen Ballen (University of Virginia Health Systems) has been working to expand the donor database and discover new ways to match donors to cancer patients. Later in the show: New...

Duration:00:51:56

Sacred and Profane

7/25/2019
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There’s a new podcast called Sacred & Profane hosted by two Religious Studies professors, Martien Halvorson-Taylor and Kurtis Schaeffer (University of Virginia). The podcast explores how people think and act with religion, how religion can affect our experience on almost every level, and the relationship between religion, race, and democracy. Later in the show: Christina Anne Kilby (James Madison University) says religion, at the level of the state, the community, the family, and the...

Duration:00:51:59

Reviving The Giant Oysters

7/18/2019
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From tracking tigers in Nepal to mountainside surgery on Montana’s wolverines, Deborah McCauley (VIEW) is on a mission to save disappearing wildlife around the world. And: Rowan Lockwood (William & Mary) is taking a closer look at the fossils of giant oysters to learn how to rebuild oyster reefs today. Later in the show: Crystal blue lakes might make for a popular tourist spot, but they’re starting to disappear. Dina Leech (Longwood University) is studying what gives lakes their color and...

Duration:00:51:58

Poetic Justice

7/11/2019
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When writer and radio producer Lulu Miller (Invisibilia) discovered she’d have to leave Virginia, she wrote a startling love letter to the state-- one that charges everyday people to stay angry about injustice. A.D. Carson (University of Virginia) uses hip-hop and spoken word to tell hard truths about racist history, cutting through denial with metaphor. Later in the show: Tawnya Pettiford-Wates (Virginia Commonwealth University) believes that theatre can heal injustice. She believes it,...

Duration:00:51:57

Summer Reading Recs

7/2/2019
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Your summer vacation packing list has some key items: cell phone charger, swimsuit, toothbrush. We're here to add some essentials to your list, with the best book recs from the With Good Reason universe.

Duration:00:51:55

We Gotta Get out of This Place

6/28/2019
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U.S. troops turned to popular music as a way of coping with the war in Vietnam. The authors of “We Gotta Get Out of this Place," Doug Bradley and Craig Werner, play songs the soldiers listened from that era and explore how that music became the soundtrack of the war. Joyce Hoffman is the author of On Their Own: Women Journalists in Vietnam. She shares stories of women who won esteemed prizes for their reporting and several who broke new ground covering the war. In recent years, more and more...

Duration:00:51:57

Music and Democracy

6/20/2019
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The evolution of social change in America can be traced through popular songs by the likes of Nat King Cole, Percy Mayfield, Lena Horne, and the Impressions. Charlie McGovern (William and Mary) shares from his new book Body and Soul: Race, Citizenship and Popular Music, 1930-1977. Nancy Hanrahan (George Mason University) says debates about music and democracy used to focus on a shared national identity, morality, and citizenship. Noel Lobley (University of Virginia) wanted to give colonial...

Duration:00:51:56

Watching History

6/13/2019
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On the eve of WWI, Antoine Köpe had a front seat to history. A century later, Antoine’s elaborate journals, cartoons, recordings, and collections reveal what it was like in the last days of the Ottoman Empire. Filmmaker Nefin Dinç (James Madison University) is collecting Antoine’s memories into a new documentary. And: Native-Uruguayan Gabriela Toletti (Tidewater Community College and Old Dominion University) says that even after decades of living in the United States, she feels like she has...

Duration:00:51:57

Parenting on the Spectrum

6/6/2019
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When Jennifer Malia (Norfolk State University) started researching her young daughter’s behaviors, she realized that both she and her daughter were on the autism spectrum. Leslie Daniel (Radford University) celebrates autism and shares some basic strategies for communicating with children on the autism spectrum. Through personal experience and extensive research, Jackie Spainhour’s has come up with some ways to make children’s museums fun for all. Temple Grandin is known as an expert in the...

Duration:00:51:55

The Civil War off the Battlefield

5/31/2019
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The very first ironclad ship built by the Union Navy in the Civil War was called The Monitor. It revolutionized the way battleships were built. Jonathan White (Christopher Newport University) is the co-author of “Our Little Monitor: The Greatest Invention of the Civil War.” Civil War buffs pride themselves on knowing the great battles of the war. But what about the fighting that took place away from battlefields? John Matsui (Virginia Military Institute) says that guerilla fighting during...

Duration:00:51:58

Grief

5/24/2019
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When parents die, we face powerful emotions, rituals, and tasks, including the eulogy. Listen as poet Jahan Ramazani (University of Virginia) pays tribute at the 2016 memorial service to his father. Also: In addition to our grief at the loss of parents, we’re often also faced with so much stuff. Marietta McCarty (Piedmont Virginia Community College) wrote a loving memoir about the daunting task of emptying her beloved family home in Leaving 1203: Emptying a Home, Filling the Heart. Later in...

Duration:00:51:55

Grief

5/24/2019
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A poet loses his dad, a daughter empties her parents house, a coach copes with his grief after his player dies in an accident.

Duration:00:51:55

Reconstructing Danville

5/17/2019
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In 1883 a young African American worker was alleged to have brushed shoulders with a white woman as they passed each other on a narrow sidewalk in Danville, Virginia. A race riot erupted and Jane Dailey (University of Chicago) says the white supremacist backlash that followed led to the disenfranchisement of Black Virginians for nearly 100 years. And: Jeff McClurken (University of Mary Washington) discusses the life of a Danville industrialist and former Confederate soldier, William T....

Duration:00:51:58

Kim Delevett Oral History

5/10/2019
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A clip of Kim Delevett talking about returning to Vietnam.

Duration:00:00:43

Through An Indian's Looking Glass

5/9/2019
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Native American historical leaders, Native recipes, and de-colonizing our diet!

Duration:00:51:55

American Terrorism

5/3/2019
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In 1979, members of the KKK shot and killed five labor and civil rights activists in Greensboro, North Carolina. Aran Shetterly (Virginia Humanities Fellow), who is writing a book about the incident, says it still reverberates in the racial politics of Greensboro today. Also: The European philosophers of the Enlightenment argued that Europeans were civilized, but Africans were barbarians. Stefan Wheelock (George Mason University) describes how radical African American writers used those same...

Duration:00:51:59

Chiquita L. Cross: Swing Low Sweet Chariot

5/2/2019
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Chiquita L. Cross: Swing Low Sweet Chariot by With Good Reason

Duration:00:02:38

Charles Chico Wiley: Precious Lord

5/2/2019
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Charles Chico Wiley: Precious Lord

Duration:00:02:33