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Rockland, MA

Language:

English

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Episodes

Through an Indian's Looking Glass

4/12/2018
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A story of Native American resilience comes to life in a new biography of Black Elk, an Oglala Lakota medicine man and Catholic preacher. Black Elk was born in 1863 and died at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Another new book illuminates the life of a Pequot Indian activist and author who is little known today, but has been called the Native American Frederick Douglas. William Apess challenged the power structure of his day using the pen, the pulpit, and protest.

Duration:00:51:58

Real Love with Sharon Saltzberg

4/6/2018
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In her new book, Real Love, Sharon Salzberg--one of the world's leading authorities on love and meditation--shows us love isn't just an emotion we feel when we're in a romantic relationship. It's an ability we can nurture and cultivate. Also, Oliver Hill shares his journey in the 1960's from the segregated south, to black radicalism, to Transcendental Meditation with the Beach Boys. Also: How "The Pause" got started. We talk with emergency care nurse Jonathan Bartels, who just wanted to...

Duration:00:51:58

Future Farming of America

3/30/2018
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Southwest Virginia has seen a decline in coal and tobacco—two industries that once boomed in the region. Could hemp be a way to boost the local economy? And more.

Duration:00:51:56

Moonshine and Prohibition

3/23/2018
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South Carolina saw the statewide prohibition of alcohol in 1915. But not before the state established its own dispensary system more than a decade earlier. Plus: oral histories of moonshiners in Appalachia.

Duration:00:28:59

Building a Wall

3/16/2018
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When Thomas Jefferson designed the University of Virginia’s central Rotunda, he set out to build a temple to the book, a stunning rebuke to the Christian churches that anchored every other college of his day. But Jefferson’s secular utopia didn’t pan out exactly as he planned.

Duration:00:51:58

Privatization and Public Universities

3/9/2018
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With state support shrinking and the dependence on private support increasing for most public universities what does the financial landscape of the future look like? What makes an institution public? Is it the source of funding? History? Mission? Or something else?

Duration:00:51:57

The Golden Age of Flattery

3/2/2018
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Washington has its fair share of brown-nosers. We talk with the authors of Sucking Up: A Brief Consideration of Sycophancy about yes-men, now and through the ages.

Duration:00:28:59

Invisible Founders

2/23/2018
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Scholars, historic interpreters, and descendants of enslaved people recently gathered at Montpelier, the home of James Madison. They were there to create a rubric for historic sites who want to engage descendant communities in their work. We share stories and interviews from Montpelier's Summit on Slavery.

Duration:00:51:57

Driving While Black

2/16/2018
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Poet Kiki Petrosino in her poem, If My Body Is a Text, reflects on a year of tragic outcomes during traffic stops between police and African American drivers. Plus: Most of us have heard of Negro League Baseball, but there were many other all-black sports leagues and teams across America in the 20th century. David Wiggins shares how African-American athletes built their own place for sports in a segregated world.

Duration:00:28:57

Love Me Do

2/9/2018
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Wine, chocolate, and flowers. We talk with experts about these Valentine's Day essentials.

Duration:00:51:58

Civil Rights and Civil War Monuments

2/2/2018
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Maggie Walker was an African American teacher and businesswoman and the first woman of any race to charter a bank in the United States. There's now a statue of her in the former capital of the Confederacy. Plus: A town’s historical markers tell visitors the story of a place. But what do they leave out?

Duration:00:28:56

Lethal Doses

1/29/2018
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America is hooked on opioids—by one count, there are currently more opioid prescriptions than people in the southeastern United States. This week we’re taking a deep dive into the causes of the opioid crisis. And more.

Duration:00:28:58

The New Minority

1/19/2018
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Donald Trump’s election was seen by many commentators as a decisive statement by a marginalized White working class. A new book The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality explains where this theory comes from and why so many White voters are feeling class and racial resentment. Plus we dive into the immigration debate and why good numbers are hard to find.

Duration:00:28:59

People Count

1/12/2018
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Today we hear a lot about "blue collar" voters, but it wasn't always the case that the working class mattered. In this week's show, we look at why working class neighborhoods tend to get the short end of the stick, how a British monarch leveraged the working class to extend her reign, and who is responsible for the origin of the census.

Duration:00:52:04

Getting to Know the Presidents

1/5/2018
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After one year in office, can we pass judgement on Trump's presidency? We talk to two experts from the University of Virginia's Miller Center who have made presidential first years their speciality. Plus, we dive deep into presidential history and ask the tough questions about America's founding fathers -- like how did these guys live so long?

Duration:00:51:58

The Future Of Music

12/29/2017
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Until recently, Caroline Shaw was uncomfortable calling herself a composer–violin, singer, musician, sure. But not a composer. Then in 2013, her composition Partita for 8 Voices made her the youngest recipient ever of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Now she’s one of the most respected composers on the New Music scene and has been heralded as the future of music. Today, Shaw’s compositions range from traditional quartets and solo piano pieces to a cappella and collaborations with Kanye West.

Duration:00:52:00

Good to Great for Nonprofits

12/22/2017
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Could nonprofits benefit from the same business coaching the private sector gets? Celebrated business writer Jim Collins says the best business leaders in the nonprofit world tend to share the same qualities with their private sector counterparts.

Duration:00:51:59

The Birthplace of American Spirits

12/15/2017
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Small-scale artisan distilleries are popping up all over the country, and behind many of them are new communities of women makers and consumers. In this special holiday episode, we connect the present to the past as we uncover little-known stories of Virginia spirits, from a recently revived 19th-century julep recipe to an event that draws “women who whiskey.”

Duration:00:51:58

Revisiting Deliverance

12/8/2017
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This week, we explore the lesser known poetic work of the man behind the iconic horror-thriller Deliverance: James Dickey. Plus, we revisit our interview with former U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey, and much more.

Duration:00:51:59

Short Listen: Virtual Cities

11/29/2017
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The ancient settlement of Çatalhöyük existed from 7500 to 5700 B.C. in what is now Turkey. Saikou Diallo and his colleagues at Old Dominion University have made a 3D virtual recreation of Çatalhöyük that transports the visitor back in time, including the sounds and smells of the ancient city.

Duration:00:05:01

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