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Environment : NPR

NPR

Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Location:

Washington, DC

Networks:

NPR

Description:

Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Language:

English

Contact:

1111 North Capitol St NE Washington, DC 20002


Episodes

In Chile's desert lie vast reserves of lithium — key for electric car batteries

9/24/2022
Chile is part of a South American region known as the "lithium triangle," where miners are trying to meet skyrocketing demand for the material.

Duration:00:05:13

Global leaders meet in Pittsburgh for climate talks

9/23/2022
Officials from around the world are meeting in Pittsburgh to discuss global climate change efforts. The event comes as leaders prepare to meet this fall for the next U.N. climate summit in Egypt.

Duration:00:03:41

Extreme heat, flooding and wildfires: How climate change supercharged the weather

9/22/2022
Washington Post reporter Brady Dennis warns our aging infrastructure systems weren't built to withstand the stresses of climate change: "There is a certain amount of suffering that we can't avoid."

Duration:00:43:46

Where the Colorado River crisis is hitting home

9/22/2022
A reckoning has come for cities and farms in the desert Southwest that were built to rely on the Colorado River.

Duration:00:07:15

Encore: Apache tribes in Arizona are leading the way in saving Emory oak trees

9/21/2022
As Emory oak trees in parts of Arizona disappear, members of several Apache tribes are working on a collaborative plan with the U.S. Forest Service and researchers to preserve them.

Duration:00:04:13

States dependent on Colorado River wonder if desalination could help the water supply

9/21/2022
Severe drought has states dependent on the Colorado River looking at alternatives. Desalinating seawater may be a viable supplement to some areas, but likely can't fix much of the river's deficit.

Duration:00:04:22

As demand for electric cars grows, Chileans face the effects of lithium mining

9/17/2022
The South American country of Chile has become a center of lithium mining, which has boomed as demand for electric car batteries has risen. But what are the environmental costs?

Duration:00:05:09

Wildlife conservation tends to save charismatic species. That may be about to change

9/12/2022
Bald eagles have soared back from the brink. Grizzly bear numbers are rebounding. But thousands of less charismatic species are competing for scarce conservation resources in the United States.

Duration:00:04:24

Brazil's presidential election will determine the fate of deforestation in the Amazon

9/11/2022
NPR's Ayesha Rasco talks to journalist Gustavo Faleiros about the deforestation of the Amazon and how the results of Brazil's presidential election could affect it.

Duration:00:04:35

Apache tribes in Arizona are leading the way in saving Emory oak trees

9/11/2022
As Emory oak trees in parts of Arizona disappear, members of several Apache tribes are working on a collaborative plan with the U.S. Forest Service and researchers to preserve them.

Duration:00:03:56

Colorado River megadrought got you down? Feel hope with TikTok's 'WesternWaterGirl'

9/10/2022
The river guide's videos offer short explanations for the water woes in the West, garnering her more than 48,000 followers since she started in April.

Duration:00:03:49

Thousands of dead fish are covering Bay Area beaches after red tide hits region

9/8/2022
Thousands of dead fish are washing up on the shores of the San Francisco Bay area. Scientists say the red tide causing the fish kill is likely driven by climate change and human wastewater runoff.

Duration:00:03:54

West Virginians divided over natural gas pipeline despite Manchin's support

9/6/2022
To get Joe Manchin's vote on a budget bill, Democratic leaders promised to consider legislation that would help a natural gas pipeline get built in his state. But the pipeline still faces opposition.

Duration:00:04:36

What it's like to stargaze in Glacier National Park

9/6/2022
Glacier National Park boasts some of the darkest skies in the U.S., so it's a perfect spot for a stargazing party at the top of 6,000-foot-tall Logan Pass.

Duration:00:03:01

You'll want these five films on your list for fall

9/6/2022
After a two-year dry spell, Hollywood's summer blockbusters finally busted some blocks this year. Now, the question is how to keep that momentum going.

Duration:00:08:24

Pakistan's former climate change minister says big polluters need to pay up

9/4/2022
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Malik Amin Aslam Khan, Pakistan's former climate change minister, about what needs to happen for his country to adapt to dangerous extreme weather, like flooding.

Duration:00:07:28

Avoiding the tap water in Jackson, Miss., has been a way of life for decades

9/4/2022
Residents accuse the largely white state government of neglecting the needs of a city that's 82% Black. White flight in the 1970s devastated the tax base, posing a major challenge to any solution.

Duration:00:06:01

The link between water quality and social inequality

9/3/2022
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Kristi P. Fedinick, Executive Director of the Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy, about her research into water violations in predominantly communities of color.

Duration:00:07:32

California lawmakers move to keep the state's last nuclear plant open

9/1/2022
California lawmakers have approved subsidies to keep the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant operating past a scheduled shutdown by 2025 in hopes of helping the state meet its climate change goals.

Duration:00:03:56

Droughts are hitting cattle ranchers hard – and that could make beef more expensive

9/1/2022
Severe drought is forcing some ranchers to send cattle to slaughter early. That's sparked a temporary glut in beef that's leading to lower prices, but it won't last.

Duration:00:03:57